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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (third)]
illustrated here is a panorama of Mineral Wells, looking east from West Mountain. The Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) are visible in center of photograph. Native plants are pictured in the left of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16243/
[Panorama 1974 (fourth)]
A view of Mineral Wells,is shown, looking southwest from East Mountain over the First National Bank (now Bank of America). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16242/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (fifth) ]
A panoramic view, probably from South Mountain, looking north-east is shown here. A portion of the mountain has been dug out and leveled for a gasoline station. Also visible are the Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) to the left of center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16241/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (sixth)]
A panorama, taken from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over North Oak Street in Mineral Wells. The Convention Center, Box Factory, and The Crazy Water Hotel are visible. Native plants are visible in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16240/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (seventh)]
A panoramic view of the city from Welcome Mountain is shown. Elmwood Cemetery is visible in the upper left part of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16239/
Palocade - Palo Pinto County - Official Centennial Program - back page
Shown here is a picture of the reverse (back) page of a souvenir program from the Palo Pinto Centennial Celebration of 1957. It consists of advertising, extolling the virtues of the First National Bank in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16329/
[A Panorama Taken in1974 (eighth)]
A panorama of houses and streets, taken from from Welcome Mountain s shown here. The purpose of the photograph remains uncertain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16238/
Palocade - Palo Pinto County - Official Centennial Program - front side
The obverse (front) page of a souvenir program from the Palo Pinto Centennial production, "Palocade," which tells the history of Palo Pinto County, which includes the names of the Centennial Queen and her court, is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16328/
[Panorama 1974 (ninth)]
A panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church (in front) is show, taken from Welcome Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16237/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (tenth)]
Shown here is a panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church, taken from the west. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16236/
Camp Wolters - Texas
Illustrated here is a panoramic view of Camp Wolters, Texas. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Area No. 4, Sports Arena, Service Club, Area No. 5, Area No. 3, Area No. 2, and Area No.1. Platoons of soldiers are marching on the left side of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16327/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (eleventh)]
A panorama of East Hubbard Street, taken from Welcome Mountain, showing Elmwood cemetery is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16235/
[An Aerial View of Northwest Mineral Wells]
An aerial view of northwest Mineral Wells that was taken between 1959 and 1969 is shown here. The Hexagon Hotel on North Oak Street can be seen in the center left foreground with the Convention Center immediately north (to the right)of it, and the Crazy Water Crystal plant two blocks northwest. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16234/
The Cullen Grimes School
Principal Donald Bond, the teachers and the students of the afternoon group at Cullen Grimes School in Mineral Wells, Texas congregate in front of the building in March of 1954. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16326/
[Dry Cleaning Bag from Baker Hotel]
A dry-cleaning bag from the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. The bag has an image of the hotel, taken from the front, as well as "The Baker Hotel - Mineral Wells, Texas, World Famous Health Resort". Further information on this artifact has not been forthcoming. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16325/
[A View from East Mountain about 1901-1912]
A view from East Mountain, looking southwest with West Mountain at right, taken in the interval about 1901-1912, is shown here. In the left foreground is the Thompson house on NE 2nd Avenue. This house was built in 1896 as a wedding present for [Mrs.]Thompson. To the right of this house is the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel were not yet built. In the far right of the photograph is First Baptist Church, on the block between 4th and 5th Avenues and Hubbard and West 1st Streets. The first Catholic church is shown at the top right, near the base of West Mountain. The Yeager Block (Drug Store)is the large white sandstone building in the left-middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16231/
[A Parade in 1925]
A parade took placed during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce's convention of 1925. The parade is moving west on NE 2nd Street. The Whatley-Maddox Ford-Lincoln Motor Company (festooned with bunting)is shown on the corner with the U.S. Post Office across the street. East of the Post Office is the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16230/
The First Anniversary of the Aviation Engineer Force Activation
Troops and spectators celebrate the first anniversary of Aviation Engineer Force Activation at Wolters Air Force Base on April 10, 1952, with Colonel A.B. Campfield, the Commander of Troops; Brigadier General H.W. Ehrgott, Commanding; Colonel Philip G. Kemp, the Base Commander. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16324/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells and South Mountain, taken from atop East Mountain is shown here. Notable buildings are the West Ward School next to the "Little Rock" school house in upper right and Poston Dry Goods in left-center. The photograph was taken before the second high school was built in 1914. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16229/
Panorama of Camp Wolters, TX
This picture is a panoramic photograph of Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas, the largest infantry replacement center in 1941. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Target Range, Regimental Area No. 4, Dental Clinic,Guest House, Service Club, Theater, Regimental Area No. 3, Infantry Replacement Center/Headquarters Area, Regimental Area No. 6, Warehouse Area, Corps Area Service Command and Hospital Area, Regimental Area No. 2, Regimental Area No. 1, and Machine Gun Range. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16323/
"The Play Place of The South"
An avioculum (bird's eye-view) of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken from East mountain and looking west-southwest. In the middle foreground are: The Crazy Flats and the third Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion. The "Crazy" Businesses burned in 1925, and the present hotel that replaced them covers the entire city block. It has since been converted [2007]to a Retirement Home. Visible also are the First Presbyterian Church, which was erected in 1909; and the Old High School, erected in 1915. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16228/
Two Men at Inspiration Point
Two men are here seen sitting on a bench at Inspiration Point. The photograph is believed to have been taken about the year 1920. The bluffs above the Brazos River are visible in the background. The man at the far left has been identified as Bealer Beard, at one time an owner of a construction company in Mineral wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16226/
The Sam Houston School--- An Afternoon Group of 1954
Students, teachers and the principal, D.R. Hudson, of the Sam Houston School's Afternoon Group are shown here in March of 1954. The picture was taken outside the school building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16322/
Our City
A photograph, taken from Welcome Mountain looking West down NW 4th Street, of unknown date is illustrated here. The small brick building in 4th Street is the Crazy Well. The first Crazy Water Hotel (left middle of picture) was built on same location as present Crazy Water hotel. The present hotel is much larger and extends to the Crazy Well. Note the Crazy Flats (drinking pavilion with apartments) in foreground. Note the first Catholic Church, on West Mountain. The West Ward School and the High School are in upper left quadrant of picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16225/
[A Panoramic View of South Mountain From East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain to South Mountain is shown here. At the mid-right of the picture is the gap between South Mountain and West Mountain where U.S. Highway 180 is now located. Just below the gap is the West Ward School House ( Mineral Wells first High School), built in 1902. The Little Rock School House to the left (south) of the West Ward School, built in 1884, Mineral Wells' First public school, is now a museum. The two spires of the First Baptist Church can be seen near the center of the picture. This photograph was taken prior to 1914, at which time a new High School was built south of the Rock School. The photograph's poor quality may be ascribed to the print source. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16224/
[A Lady sitting on West Mountain]
An unidentified lady is shown sitting on the south end of West Mountain. The single word "Mother" is written on bottom of photograph. Note the graffiti on the stone: "8-10-00" (which would be 1900), and some initials. The road at bottom of "mountain" is now U.S. Highway 180. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16223/
Sam Houston School
Students, teachers and principal D.R. Hudson, of the Sam Houston School in March 1954 stand outside the school building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16321/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, looking northwest. Identified buildings include the Baker Hotel (center), the Hexagon Hotel (right, north of Baker), the Convention Hall (next to and right of the Hexagon), the Box Factory (formerly the Crazy Water Crystal plant, left and west of the Hexagon Hotel), the First Methodist Church (across street right and northeast of Baker), the Baker Parking Garage (across the street, south of and immediately in front of the Hotel in this picture), and the Baker Water Works (extreme right middle, up the slope of East Mountain.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16222/
Crazy Hotel from East Mountain
In this view from East Mountain along NE 2nd Street toward West mountain, the West Ward School, Mineral Wells "Old" High School, and the "Little Rock School" are all visible in the upper middle of the picture on this side of the gap between West Mountain and South Mountain. The rebuilt Crazy Hotel is seen in the right middle of the photograph, and construction of the Nazareth Hospital to the northwest of the Hotel is underway at the right of and behind the hotel. Nazareth Hospital was built by the Crazy Hotel as a clinic, but was later sold to a catholic order of nurses and operated as a hospital. (In the early 1960s, two floors of the Crazy Hotel were used as a hospital while the new Palo Pinto General Hospital was being built.) Dr. A.W. Thompson's home(1896)is in the middle foreground of the picture and the Mineral Wells Sanitarium is beyond it. The Cliff House Hotel occupied this site initially, but it burned, and was replaced by the Plateau Hotel. The Plateau Hotel's name was later changed to the Exchange Hotel, and still later it was converted into the Mineral wells Sanitarium, also known as the Hospital. Next to and beyond "the Hospital" is Mineral Wells' (1912) Post office. The photograph was taken shortly after the second Crazy Hotel opened in 1927. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16221/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
This is a view of Mineral Wells, taken from East Mountain, looking southwest. Poston Dry Goods (now [2008]the Palo Pinto County Courthouse annex)is shown in the left foreground); the First Baptist Church (upper right); the Dr. A.W. Thompson residence in middle foreground, with Mineral Wells Sanatorium to its right (west). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16220/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain, looking down on Mineral Wells and taken about 1910, includes: The First United Methodist Church, the Yeager Building, and the train depot in the background. This photograph was taken before the Baker Hotel was built. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16219/
[A Bird's Eye-view of Mountains in the Distance]
Illustrated here is a view of Mineral Wells from the southeast, looking northwest. On the left, the large building in front of the hill is the Chautauqua, built by public subscription in 1905. It was demolished sometime about 1912. The large white building near the edge at the left middle of the picture was the First Baptist Church, which served the congregation from 1900 to 1920. The dim building under the hill at the upper right of the picture is the East Ward School (Mineral Wells' first High School), built in 1906 and closed in 1926. Please note the windmills in the backyards. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16218/
[The City Nestled Among the Hills]
This picture was taken from East Mountain, from a site above and left (south) of the former Chautauqua (1905-1912.) Note the Crazy Water Hotel at the left edge of the picture (which opened in 1927 on the corner of North Oak and NW 3rd Streets.) Note also the Nazareth Hospital built by the Crazy Corporation, behind and right of the Crazy. The back of the "WELCOME" (1921 vintage) sign on the south end of this mountain and facing south, is at the immediate middle foreground. This sign was the world's largest non-commercial electric lighted sign when it was donated to the city in 1922 following a Rotary Club of Texas convention. The sign is reputed to be the inspiration for the more publicized "HOLLYWOOD" sign in Los Angeles, California. It is much larger than the photograph suggests. Lesser known sites in the picture are The Hawthorn Drinking Pavilion one block north (right) of Nazareth Hospital and the Crazy Theater, across Oak Avenue, at the right and front of the Crazy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16217/
The Tattler, May 18, 1934
Student newspaper from Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas. It contains articles about the graduating class of 1934, including information about class officers, class prophecies, caps and gowns, class events, and local advertisements. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16320/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain looking west along NW 3rd Street is shown here. Visible landmarks include: The first Crazy Water Hotel, (built in two sections in 1911 and 1912) with its common lobby entrance on NW 3rd Street; the U.S. Post Office in the left foreground; the first Roman Catholic Church on the side of West Mountain at NW 3rd Street; Mineral Wells High School; West Ward School in the gap between West and South Mountains; and the Presbyterian Church on NW 2nd Street, one block northeast of West Ward School. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16216/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention, 1911],
This is another picture of the convention of The Woodmen of the World in 1911. Note the men holding symbolic axes. This picture represents half of a photographic panorama view. It was taken at the back of Crazy Flats, the Crazy Water Company's third Drinking Pavilion, that also offered rooms for rent. The first Crazy Hotel was built on this open lot the following year. Clark's Pharmacy and The Lithia Drug Company are also pictured behind and to the left of the "Crazy Flats." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16215/
Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells
Two contiguous negatives, taken from East Mountain, looking Southwest are shown here. Please note that some landmarks have been numbered in ink on the photographs. On the first [upper] photograph (No. 3), the pavilion with the steeple on the roof,is the Hawthorne well, located at 314 NW 1st Ave. (No. 4), the large two-story structure, is the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Lithia Pavilion is the structure between the Hawthorne and Crazy pavilions. Note also the Hawthorn House (No. 5?), located on North Oak. The large livery stable in the left foreground has not been identified by name. Please note the Poston Building on the second [lower] photograph, on North Oak (not numbered, but the three-part building in the middle left of the photograph). Also, please note the two steeples of the first Catholic Church on NW 3rd Street, in the 600 block, on the side of West Mountain. The large two-story frame hotel (No. 2) in the left foreground has not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16214/
[An Aerial View of Early Mineral Wells]
Two very early panoramic views of Mineral Wells are shown here, one of them, the UPPER PICTURE, being the north-west Business District of the city looking southwest. Note the horse-drawn transportation in the streets, and Poston's Dry Goods store in the upper middle. In the LOWER PICTURE looking northwest, a livery stable shows in the lower left corner; the Hawthorn Water Pavilion (with spire) is shown in the left middle above and right of the livery stable barn; the Crazy Drinking Pavilion is the large two-story building at upper middle of lower photograph; and the Hexagon Hotel is near the skyline at the upper right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16213/
[An Early View of Mineral Wells, Left Portion]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells, looking from the South Mountain to the northeast is shown here. Note: The Hexagon House (middle upper right), First Baptist Church (two white spires in middle right), Chautauqua (far upper right), West Ward School (large building at left middle with "Little Rock School" immediately to this side). [This is the left portion of a contiguous pair of pictures that make up this view. The right portion of the photograph is shown following.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16212/
[An Early View of Mineral Wells: Right Portion]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells from South Mountain looking northeast, this picture gives the other side of a photograph, which, with the preceding, comprise one picture. The Exchange Hotel (upper left of the picture below East Mountain, with Dr. Thompson's home to its immediate right is visible) This is approximately the northeast edge of the City Business District, but other landmarks cannot be identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16211/
Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex[as]
Shown here is a photograph titled "Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex." It shows the completed building of the Oxford Hotel, and First State Bank and Trust Company, located at Oak and Hubbard. Note the period automobile. Written under the picture is: "I was just getting along alright [sic] write and let me know [lacuna?] you all are getting along. Will go to Wichita Falls next wk" [Signature illegible] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16208/
Period Hotel and Annex
The Period Hotel and Annex was located at N.W. 4th Avenue and 6th Street. It was managed by Miss Lizzie More. The hotel was destroyed by fire. The Annex was later known as the Town House Apartments. The Annex is still extant in 2007. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16207/
Fairfield Inn
The Fairfield Inn, built by Col. Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was a very popular rooming and boarding house in the early days of Mineral Wells. It was located at 814 North Oak Street, across Oak Street and one block north of the contemporary Hexagon Hotel. Part of the retaining wall shown in the picture still exists. Mr. Boykin built his home at 1501 SE 4th Avenue. The home was later sold to William Whipple Johnson, who operated the Rock Creek coal mines in eastern Parker County around 1910. Mr. Johnson, with his brother Harvey, had previously opened the coal mines at Thurber on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line in 1908. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16206/
[Green Cottage]
The "Green Cottage", located at NW 1st Avenue and NW 2nd Street, was built by Tom Green, owner of Green's Livery Stables. This photograph appears on page 102 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." by A. F. Weaver. [The people in picture remain unidentified.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16205/
[An Aerial Picture of Downtown Mineral Wells]
An aerial picture of downtown Mineral Wells is shown here. The Baker Hotel (right middle of picture) and the Crazy Hotel (left middle) are included in it. Note: The "Welcome" sign was moved from its original location on the hill behind the Baker Hotel in 1972. It was moved to the east side of Bald Mountain which is due east of the Baker and now called Welcome Mountain, just above and to the right of the Baker Hotel, where it remains today. The Damron Hotel (shown one block this side, west of the Baker, in this picture) burned in 1975, thus dating this photograph to an era between 1972 and 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16204/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-southeast looking northwest. The Baker Hotel is the dominant building in the middle left of the picture. The Crazy Hotel is seen two blocks north (right) and one block west of the Baker. Immediately in front of the Baker is the hotel swimming pool (the second hotel to have its own pool). To the right (north) of the pool is the First Methodist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16203/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Southeast, 1967]
An aerial photograph that was taken April 29, 1967 of Mineral Wells looks northwest. Notable landmarks are the Baker Hotel (in the middle of the picture), United First Methodist Church (a block east and to the right of the Baker), the Crazy Water Hotel (above the church), the Box Factory two-three blocks right of The Crazy, the Old High School (the three-story structure about six blocks left (west) of the Baker at the edge of the populated area), and the Old Rock School House (right and adjacent to) the Old High School. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16202/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Northwest, 1967]
This photograph illustrates an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the northwest. Note the Baker Hotel in the middle of the top half of the picture. The Crazy Water Hotel is below the Baker (two blocks in front). The Box Factory is the white many-storied building a few blocks below The Crazy and near the center of the picture. The Nazareth Hospital is a block to the right of The Crazy. The Mineral Wells Box Factory (Formerly the Crazy Water Crystals plant) is about two blocks this side (below) the Crazy Hotel and Convention Hall is a block to its left. The photograph was taken April 29, 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16201/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Southwest]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells from the southwest is shown here. It starts about SW 4th Avenue. The photograph was taken before 1967, the year the present First Baptist Church, which is not visible on lower left of the photograph, was completed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16200/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
Illustrated here is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east looking west. The Parkwood apartments and the brick factory are in the background. The Sands Motel is in the bottom part of the picture, and East Hubbard Street (Highway US 180) is in the far lower left corner of the picture. The large vacant area was later developed, with Lakewell House Retirement Home built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16199/