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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Parade in 1925]
A military contingent of the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade is proceeding west in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street. Please note the Mineral Wells Sanatorium in the upper right of the photograph just east of the old Post Office. Please note also the double line of angle-parked automobiles on the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16298/
[North Oak Avenue Street Scene]
A street scene of North Oak Avenue, looking north from Hubbard Street, taken about 1930, includes businesses as: Palace Drug Company, Owl Book Store, American Cafe, Poston Dry Goods, Max Miller's Shoe Store, Caldwell Hotel, Texas Power and Light, Bath House and Crazy Water Hotel. Please note that the street has been paved, and a traffic light is present. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16296/
[People in a Parade]
A buggy is shown here, filled with people dressed in what appears to be fashions from the 1920's. The buggy wheels are decorated for a parade and the buggy itself has the name "T. J. Green" on it. The location appears to be in front of the Gibson Well in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, now [2008] the location of the First Christian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16295/
[The Mineral Wells High School Concert Band]
This picture, showing the concert band of the Mineral Wells High School Marching Band (standing on the steps of the school) was taken around 1922. James Walker Calvert is on the top row at the far right. Mr. Brunswick, the bandleader, is on the front row at the far left. Ellis White is the trombone player on the left. See also "Mineral Wells High School Marching Band." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16361/
Time Was in Mineral Wells
The dust cover of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells... 1975 Edition." It is considered the first pictorial history of the city. The book is the product of A.F. Weaver, whose collection of photographs constitutes this collection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16294/
Lower End of Mesquite St.
A view of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue), taken in 1910, and looking south-east. The scene shows horse-drawn wagons loaded with cotton bales. Electrical lines are visible. The building at the northeast corner of East Hubbard Street and South Mesquite Street is the D.M. Howard Block. D. M Howard was the first of five Howard brothers to come to Mineral Wells and establish businesses. There was a Dry Goods store on the left end of the building, a millinery shop above it, and a grocery store was in the building to the right. Later the J.M. Belcher Furniture occupied the building; and still later, R&W Furniture. Demolition of the building began March 17 of 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan Building and a parking lot. The First State Bank now [2007] occupies this entire block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16293/
A Mineral Wells Public Schools Certificate of Promotion
A certificate of Promotion from Mineral Wells Public Schools, certifying that Floy Stone has completed the 8th grade in May 1903 is shown here. It is signed by B. C. Osborn. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16360/
One of the Residence Streets
Pictured here is a promotional brochure. The main part of the picture is a view looking west on Moore Street (now NE 6th Street). At the left (south) side of the street, in the middle distance, is the Hexagon House Hotel that was built by David G. Galbraith, inventor of the paper clip. The hotel opened in 1897. To the immediate left is the Gibson Well and Drinking Pavilion. At the far corner of the Gibson property, in the middle of the street, appears to be the public drinking fountain shown in a companion picture--AWO_1076P--which is also included in the Weaver Collection. The fountain was apparently removed from the intersection when the "Dinky cars" began operating to Lake Pinto in 1905. The poor quality of the image is due to print screening. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16292/
West Side School -- Second Grade 1907
The second grade class at West Side School in 1907 sit on the steps outside the old rock building built in 1886. The teacher is Miss Amie Hensley. Some of the names of the children are listed on the back. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16359/
[Women in a Decorated Car]
Five females ("Aunt Matie, Edith Preston, Lena, and two of Edith's friends", a legend states on the back)) in a decorated car outside the Western Union Telegraph office. Signs on and by the building read "Crazy Well Flats and Modern Rooms", "Cigars", and "Western Union Telegraph and Cable Office." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16358/
Memorial Day Parade 1955
This picture shows a float, sponsored by the State National Bank, that depicts the raising the American flag on the island of Iwo Jima during WWII. The float is passing in front of the Oak Avenue Cafe at the corner of NE 2nd Street and Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The G and A Feed store, pictured in the background, faces NE 2nd Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16291/
[The St. Nicholas Hotel]
A group of men stand in front of the St. Nicholas Hotel. A colophon at the lower right designates this picture as a photographic souvenir from Minerals Wells, taken by Dan W. Evans. The building had a varied history. It was first (in 1904) an unnamed two-and-one-half-story sanitarium, then re-named the St. Nicholas Hotel, and then later it became the Delaware Hotel. It was located at N. Oak and NE 3rd Street. The building was eventually consumed by fire on October of 1907. The back of photograph has a T and P Railway logotype and this information about the Jericho Fine Photo Company: "Mountain and Donkey Groups, View Souvenirs and Scenery of Min-Wells, Kodak Supplies and Finishing, Button and Stamp Photos a Specialty. Dan W. Evans Prop. Min Wells, Tex." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16357/
In The Good Old Days
This picture is accompanied by a newspaper article that chronicles the activities of a group of men repairing the public highway between Mineral Wells and Palo Pinto in the year 1920--before the Texas Highway Department was created. Pictured are the following people: Harold Guinn on left with spade. J. L. Miller on truck fender. Standing, left to right: Red Taylor, George Oliver, Johnnie Liveley; Irl Preston and W. T. Tygrett shaking hands, with Joe Dillon standing between them. Also standing in the background are Clarence Wewerkka, W. C. Caldwell, W. I. Smith, and Lawrence Davis. The photograph is listed as courtesy of W. T. Tygrett. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16289/
[Paving East Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells]
A group of men work on paving East Hubbard street in Mineral Wells. Electrical lines are present. Street paving in Mineral Wells began in 1914. On the right is the Richards House. Behind the house is Lamar Flats water pavilion, now [2008]the site of the Baker Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16288/
[Mesquite Street, Looking South]
Shown here is a view of Mesquite Street (Now--2008--NE First Avenue) from its upper end at Coke Street (now NE 2nd Street). Horse-drawn vehicles are present. The building at the left middle of the picture with the "DRUGS" sign and the stone lion statue on its roof is the Yeager Building, home of what was popularly called "The Lion Drug Store." The first building on right, 205 NE First Street (with arched windows) was H. M. Coleman's clothing store for men, which even at this early date, appears to be undergoing renovation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16287/
[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]
An early scene of Mesquite Street (now [2008] NE 1st Avenue) looking North toward old U.S. Post Office from the corner of East Hubbard Street. Electrical lines are present as are cars and trucks typical of the post-1914 era, when the streets of Mineral Wells were paved. The cornerstone for the Post Office was laid in May, 1912. The building on the near right housed Campbell's Bargain store. It occupied the site of the current Baker Hotel (Opened in 1929.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16286/
[The Zonta Club of Mineral Wells--a Program, 1994]
A program from the January 1994 Zonta International meeting in Mineral Wells honoring the distinguished women graduates of Mineral Wells High School. The mark "/MWSCH (3)" invites interpretation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16356/
[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]
A scene in the 400 block of North Oak, looking towards the south on Oak Avenue, taken in the 1930's. (Shadows indicate the picture was taken in the early morning.) The Budweiser Clydesdale team was introduced to the public in 1933, and is shown along the 200 block west. The "CRAZY" sign that spanned Hubbard Ave. (now US Highway 180) a block behind the Clydesdale team was erected in 1933 also, probably later in the same year the picture was taken. A two-story garage/office building, the former Seaman's Pontiac Agency (still standing in 2010) is visible alongside the Anheuser-Busch beer wagon. Other businesses noted are: Dr. M. S. Green, Chiropractor; King's Cafe. The prominent building behind the Clydesdale team is still standing at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue. Advertising signs noted: Texaco, Mobilgas, and a sign on the seaman's building for Crazy Water Crystals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16285/
[A Mineral Wells High School Commencement Program of 1968]
A Commencement program from Mineral Wells High School, that took place on May 24, 1968. Note its small size, as shown by the ruler next to it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16355/
Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]
A view of Moore Street (now NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16284/
A Program for the "Victory Queen" and "Victory on the Home Front"
A program for The Victory Queen and Victory on the Home Front, presented by Mineral Wells High School at the Convention Hall on March 8, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16354/
[A Program for "Lazy Town", an Opera in Two Acts]
A program for "Lazy Town - An Opera in Two Acts", presented by Sam Houston School on May 14, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16353/
[A Program for "Sunny of Sunnyside"- - an Operetta]
A program for "Sunny of Sunnyside - An Operetta", presented at the Travis School Auditorium on April 29-30, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16352/
NW 6th Street-1906
A legend on the photograph announces: "NW 6th Street: 1906." It shows two children on donkeys and a horse and wagon. The view is west from Welcome Mountain (now East Mountain.) It appears that the old McCutcheon home (now [2008] the Gil Hull home) can be seen on the right at 612 NW 6th Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16283/
[A Program for Mineral Wells High School Commencement 1934]
A program from the Mineral Wells Commencement of 1934, which was held in the still-standing Convention Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16351/
Greetings from Palo Pinto, Texas
Shown here is the photograph of a postcard from Palo Pinto, Texas. The front has a photograph of a lake, trees, and a dirt road. The back of the card card has "Brown Road Scenes", and handwritten correspondence, that is not presented here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16350/
Oak Street , Looking South
We have here a picture of Oak Street, looking South. The Poston Company and the Palace Saloon are easily visible in photograph. The wording "Fishburn Dallas" appears on the photograph. The unpaved street, several horses and wagons in picture date the picture to an era before 1914, when the street was paved. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16282/
[Inspiration Point]
The view from Inspiration Point, overlooking the Brazos River seven miles south of Mineral Wells. Billy Sunday, a popular evangelical preacher in America, visited Mineral Wells in 1900. He exclaimed "This is an inspiration!" when he saw the beautiful scenery south of the town. He unwittingly gave the Point its name. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16349/
[The West Ward School]
Exterior of the West Ward School in Mineral Wells, TX. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16348/
Petroleum Products, The Texas Company
This is a picture of truck number D-677, bearing the identification of Texaco Petroleum Products, The Texas Company. A woman sits in the cab of the truck. The truck itself seems to date to about 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16281/
[The Mineral Wells High School Marching Band]
The Mineral Wells High School marching band is shown here performing on a football field in the late 1930's. The band director at that time was Mr. Dave Brunswick. See also "Mineral Wells High School Concert Band." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16347/
"Baker Hotel" Menu
This photograph illustrates an October 1929 menu from the Stephen F. Austin Hotel, a "Baker Hotel" (located in Austin, Texas), similar to the one that opened in Mineral Wells in 1929 is shown here. The Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells was apparently one of a chain of hotels. This menu serves as a reminder of that fact. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16346/
[Two Men and a Woman]
This picture shows two unidentified men and a woman. The photograph is believed to have been taken during construction of the road up Wynn Mountain east of Palo Pinto (prior to construction of the Bankhead Highway, which was built following passage of "Good Roads Act" in 1916.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16280/
A Program for the Coronation of the Queen at MWHS, 1934
The program for the Eighth Annual Mineral Wells High School Coronation of the Queen, held on January 18, 1934. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16345/
The Fiftieth Reunion of the Graduating Class of 1934
This picture reproduces a newspaper clipping that reports the fiftieth reunion of the 1934 class from Mineral Wells High School. It was published in the Mineral Wells Index on June 28, 1984. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16344/
Looking south on Mesquite Street
A street scene, identified as Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue)and looking south, taken at the turn of the twentieth century, shows businesses that antedate the coming of the automobile. On the right, in the middle of the picture, the Yeager Building is shown with a stone lion mounted on its roof. Many historians now refer to this building as the Lion Drug Store. However, current Yeager descendants now living in Mineral Wells do not remember the store ever being named anything but The Yeager Drug Store. The third building on the left (with the spire on top) was the Star Well whose manager, Frank Richards was an active participant in Mineral Wells' early business and social activities. At the end of the street is Mineral Wells depot built in 1902. Absence of the "Dinky Car" tracks in the middle of the street indicates that the picture was taken prior to the building of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway in 1905. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16279/
Site of the New Frost Building
Construction of Frost Building in Mineral Wells, Texas. A legend on the bottom reads: "Photograph by McClure." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16278/
[The Delaware Hotel on fire]
The destruction of the Delaware Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The hotel was located at the corner of N. Oak Avenue and NE 3rd St. The fire was fought by horse-drawn fire wagons and a pumper. Trolley rails visible in middle of unpaved street date the picture as being between 1907, when the street car began operations, and 1914 when the street was paved. A partly obliterated legend on the photograph declares that it was taken by "Ellis." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16277/
Crazy Hotel, Mineral Wells, Texas - America's Great Health Resort
This picture shows a pamphlet that was presumably published for the purpose of enticing prospective guests to the Crazy Hotel. The text touts the hotel as being "Fire-proof" (Its predecessor was not), and it extends "Special considerations shown at many hotels only to a favored few." The text is surrounded with pictures of the accommodations, and the various activities available at the hotel. At the very bottom, there is an advertisement for Crazy Crystals. The text ends with a notice of where to inquire about rates. If the dress of the ladies pictured is any guide, the pamphlet dates to the era of the 1920's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16343/
Come to Mineral Wells
Shown here is a pamphlet from the Chamber of Commerce, describing the healthful benefits of a visit to Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16342/
[A Vacant lot in downtown Mineral Wells]
A vacant lot in downtown Mineral Wells, Texas, next to the Central Christian Church, located on NW 1st Street. Advertisements of products, and coming movie attractions, are displayed on a large bill board, and on an adjoining house. The lot is messy, and a note indicates that it is to be part of a beautification project. The clean-up referred to in the accompanying note was probably more than a general "Spring Cleaning" campaign for the city of Mineral Wells. It was probably part of the "Wylie Park" beautification project. Smoke rising from stove pipes belonging to nearby businesses indicate cool weather. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16274/
[Ladies with parasols]
"Sllew La Renim" (a social club) was "Mineral Wells" spelled backwards. Its members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913. Identified in the photograph are: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers. Note the Mineral Wells Sanitarium in the left background. This photograph may be found on page 118 of "TIME WAS...", First Edition by A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16273/
The Oxford Hotel
The Hubbard Street Trolley car is shown at Oak and Hubbard Streets on its way west to Pinto Lake, next to the Oxford Hotel. The First State Bank and Trust was located in the northwest (near) corner of the hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16272/
Oak Street, Looking North
An early view of Oak Street (now Oak Avenue), looking North is shown here. The first intersecting road is Hubbard Street. Part of the Oxford Hotel is visible on the southeast corner of Hubbard and Oak. Please note the utter lack of street lights. Street car tracks and an overhead cable run on Oak. Mineral Wells Electric System (Street Car) ceased operation in 1913. The downtown streets were paved in 1914. A hardware store, possibly Davidson's, is on the southwest corner of Hubbard and Oak. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16271/
[A Portrait Presentation at KORC]
Mrs. Jess (Ruby) Shattles presents a photographic picture of Achilles Corcanges, founder and owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells to the same Mr. Corcanges. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studio at 412 N. Oak Avenue. The picture was taken about 1946, when station KORC opened. The unidentified gentleman, with his back to the photographer,on the left is believed to be Mr. Shattles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16270/
[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]
Please note the men in golf attire standing on bank, one of whom is holding a bag of golf clubs. Knee-length knickers with decorated socks were typical golf wear in the Roaring Twenties. Others are lounging around on the bank between club house and lake on a typical lazy Sunday afternoon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16269/
KORC 1140 On Your Dial
A picture of a KORC-KBS Microphone--"1140 on your dial" is shown here. Mineral Wells' radio history dates back to the 1930's when Mr. Hal Collins, owner of the Crazy Hotel, began sponsoring broadcasts originating in the hotel lobby. The radio station was founded and owned by Mr. Achilles Corcanges, and aired its first broadcast on December 5, 1946. Radio station KMWT-FM began broadcasting from Mineral Wells in 1970. The broadcasts were aired nationwide, at noon daily, over the Texas Quality Network. It advertised Crazy Water Crystals. Both stations' call letters were changed in 1983 to KJAS-AM and KYXS-FM. Many show business luminaries appeared on the shows. For instance, Mary Martin of Weatherford began her singing/acting career here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16268/
[A Tamale Vendor on Oak and Hubbard]
Fred Estrada "The Mineral Wells Hot Tamale Man," sold "The Best Tamales Anywhere", at 75 cents a dozen, at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue for many years. Automobiles, dating from the early-to-mid-twentieth century, and a U.S. Mailbox, may also be seen in the picture. The picture occurs on page 182 of "TIME WAS...", second edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16267/
[A Trolley Car of the] Mineral Wells Electric System
This picture shows the Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car Number 23. The Mineral Wells Electric System operated from 1907 to 1913. The picture appears to have been taken in the 1400 block of W. Hubbard Street, where the street car unloaded passengers for a short hike north to Lake Pinto. The street car reversed here, and traveled across town to Elmwood Cemetery--around NE 17th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16266/
[The Lynch Cabins]
A drawing of the Lynch cabins, done by Jarmon Alvis Lynch, grandson of James Alvis Lynch. The drawing says "Alvis Lynch 77" in the bottom right-hand corner. The picture was apparently done from memory. The original mineral water discovery well is in the right foreground, with a windlass for drawing water. "Judge" Lynch and his family did not arrive in Millsap Valley until Christmas 1879. Note the tents in the right background. H. M. Berry, Mineral Wells' first teacher, noted in an article that when the reputation for the curative powers of the water spread, the area looked like "an army on the move" with health-seekers temporarily camping in tents until housing could be built for them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16265/