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[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows a celebrity car in the "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) parade, held April 4, 1976. The passengers riding in the back seat of the 1976 Cadillac El Dorado convertible are The Mayor of Mineral Wells, Ellis White, and his wife, Janie. The picture was taken at the intersection of Oak Street (Highway 281) and Hubbard Avenue (Highway 180) in downtown Mineral Wells. The car is moving south on Oak Street, with the Baker Hotel one block east in background. The camera that took the picture is facing east-northeast. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16143/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float, depicting the Rock School House in the "Time Was" featured in Bicentennial parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). Built in 1884, it was Mineral Wells' first public school. The float is shown at the corner of Hubbard and North Oak Streets. It was sponsored by the Junior History Club. A sign on the building in the background identifies the Proctor Schneider Insurance Agency. This site was formerly occupied by the First National Bank. The Baker Hotel is in left background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16142/
[A Parade With a Rotary Club float]
The Rotary Club float in Mineral Wells' 1976 Bi-Centennial Parade featured riders, in clothes typifying the period, that represent a "Roaring Twenties" golfer dancing with "Flapper Fannies." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16141/
[The "Old" Post Office]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16140/
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16139/
[The Christmas Rush With the First Airmail]
The sorting room of the "old post office" at Christmas time. Airmail had just arrived in Mineral Wells. The caption "1916" is written in the top margin of photograph. Air Mail arrived in Mineral Wells in two distinct eras. The first was from the 1916 date on this photograph to about the beginning of World War II. The mail route of that era was marked by rotating signal beacons for night flight, and low frequency radio directional beams with "A" (dot-dash) and "N" (dash-dot) Morse Code signals to indicate straying, right or left, from the true course between landing fields during flight operations. These deliveries were suspended during World War II, and improved service was resumed for a period of time a few years after the war. At one time during the 1950's-1960's, Trans Texas Airways operated from Shreveport,Louisiana. to El Paso, Texas It made scheduled daily stops in Mineral Wells for both passengers and mail. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16137/
James Alvis Lynch, Founder of Mineral Wells
Photograph of James Alvis Lynch, who founded Mineral Wells in 1881, is wearing a suit, sitting on a donkey, and holding a bottle of mineral water on an unknown rocky hill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16136/
[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]
An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16135/
[R.L. Polk & Co.'s Mineral Wells City Directory, 1909]
The city directory for Mineral Wells, 1909, embracing a complete alphabetical list of business firms and private citizens; a directory of city and county officials, churches, public and private schools, banks, asylums, hospitals, commercial bodies, secret societies, street and avenue guide, etc. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20207/
[R.L. Polk & Co.'s Mineral Wells City Directory, 1920]
The city directory for Mineral Wells, 1920, embraces a complete alphabetical list of business firms and private citizens; a directory of city and county officials, churches, public and private schools, banks, asylums, hospitals, commercial bodies, secret societies, street and avenue guide, etc. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20206/
[The J.S. Murphy Home]
The J.S. Murphy home, located on East Mountain (facing West), overlooks the city. The house was built by Murphy in 1905, and remodeled into a full two-story home in 1915. Mr Murphy was a partner of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors, who built many of the homes and buildings of Mineral Wells, including the Old High School. The picture appears on pages 114 and 140 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", 2004, Mini Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20367/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel was built in 1895 by David G. Galbraith, the inventor of the paper clip, and co-developer of acetate synthetic fiber. According to Ellen Puerzer ("The Octagon House Inventory", Eight-saquare Publishing, copyright 2011), the building was twelve-sided, clad with clapboard, built on a stone foundation. Two English stonemasons did all stonework, presumably also the work on the DC generating plant next to the hotel. The rooms within were hexagon-shaped, with a bath being shared between every two rooms. The well-ventilated "honeycomb" structure (a master-stroke in the days before air-conditioning)opened in December 1897. The stone building behind and left of the Hotel is the plant for generating electricity used for a light in every room in the hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20365/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A large group of people, most sitting on donkeys, are shown out front of the Hexagon Hotel. Donkeys were used to transport visitors to the top of East Mountain for an overview of the City of Mineral Wells. It appears the party in this picture is preparing for such a trip. The building behind the Hexagon is the electrical (DC) generating plant. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20352/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A color photograph of the Hexagon Hotel is shown here. Please note the Convention Hall to the right (north) of the Hotel. The Convention Hall was built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, and was built over a portion of the foundation of the electric power plant of the hotel. The Hexagon Hotel was torn down in 1959, and the Convention Center was demolished in 1977. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20360/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall, built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20358/
The Stage in the Casino [Elmhurst Parkl]
This picture illustrates the stage in the casino at Elmhurst Park. Several signs above the stage advertise the (Cafe) Royal, furniture, and the Palace Bar. Two unidentified women and one man stand on the stage. It appears on page 187 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", second edition, 1988. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20350/
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park]
This is a picture of the Casino, which was once located at Elmhurst Park, and illustrated on page 187 of A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition, 1988. Note: this is an early photograph, taken during or shortly after its construction. In later pictures, watch towers have been added to the pylons framing the front entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20356/
[An Early Parade on N. Oak Avenue]
A parade on N. Oak Avenue around the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The Hexagon House (at the right center of the picture) was built in 1897, and a street car ran down the middle of the street from 1907 to 1913 (no tracks are visible here). Please observe the condition of the street. It was not paved until 1914. The Vichy Well drinking pavilion (later known as the Standard Well) is visible on the right skyline. This pavilion was torn down for the USO at the beginning of World War II. The large two-story building at the left middle of the picture was the Carlsbad Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20354/
[A Panoramic View of Mineral Wells]
The southern half of a two-part panoramic view of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas, taken about 1910 occupies this photograph. In this view, the Crazy Flats drinking pavilion is seen at the upper left;First Methodist Church near the skyline to the right of the Crazy Flats; and the First Presbyterian Church (domed building) at the upper far right of the picture. The houses shown are predominantly in the Queen Anne style--a popular one at the time of the photograph. This picture occurs on page 133 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", first edition, 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20330/
[A View of Mineral Wells] 1886
An oval inset of Mineral Wells as it appeared in 1886. The photograph on which it is overlaid was made in approximately 1925. Above, and right of the overlay, is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel complex, the current site of the Baker Hotel. An incomplete text under the picture compares Mineral Wells to other worldwide mineral water resort cities. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20323/
[The First Mineral Wells Golf Country Club]
The first clubhouse of The Mineral Wells Golf and Country Club is shown here. This picture comes from Knights of Pythias Album, 1925. The swimming area and lifeguard station can be seen at the far left of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20348/
[A Panorama of Mineral Wells, Texas: Looking East]
Shown here is Mineral Wells, Texas looking east. This photograph was taken from Northwest Mountain, by A.F. Weaver on September 5, 1997. The Baker Hotel is in the center of the picture, with the Second Crazy Water Hotel in front of and left of the Baker; and the Nazareth Hospital, to the left of the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20346/
A Convention, West Texas Chamber of Commerce
This photograph shows a view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain. It is inscribed "Convention West Texas Chamber of Commerce." A companion picture is dated "May 4-5-6, 1925". The train depot is in the left middle background. The church in the middle foreground is the First Methodist Church, and immediately behind and above it is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel. The home to the left (east) of the Methodist Church was the home of Pharmacist C. Y. Yeager. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20344/
[Inspiration Point?]
There is some controversy concerning the location shown in this photograph. Two notes on back of the picture read "So. of city on 281", and "Lake M W." (Lake Mineral Wells is east of the city.) This picture appears to be taken just east of Inspiration point, instead, and looking southwest, where the highway starts down the mountain. The area was a popular picnic spot from the 1930's to the 1950's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20343/
[An Early Oil Field]
An early oil field, probably in Palo Pinto County, is shown here. The photograph, perhaps a composite of several smaller ones, originally was in the possession of M. A. Howell, who was once the county surveyor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20342/
Fairfield Inn, Mineral Wells, Tex
Shown here is a an extensively damaged and repaired postcard of the Fairfield Inn. The inn, built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was located at 814 N. Oak Avenue and faced west. The postcard is addressed to A. J. Ryder, Mallory Docks, Galveston, Texas. The postmark it bears dates to 1911. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20341/
Delaware Hotel
The Delaware Hotel, at 316 N. Oak Avenue, is shown here in its glory days. Formerly named "The St. Nicholas Hotel", the Delaware was destroyed by fire. This photograph has been restored. It appears in its original form (as the St. Nicholas) in picture AWO_0564N [St. Nicholas Hotel]. The current picture was "modified" with the name changes (to the Delaware) on signs and re-named at the bottom of the picture. At the time it became the Delaware, this was probably the best picture of the structure. (Subsequent adjacent buildings and power lines interfered with the view). The Chautauqua Theater is identifiable at the immediate left and behind the hotel. This version of the picture is on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20340/
[The Wagley Bath House]
The Wagley Mineral Baths, formerly known as the Bimini Bath House, was located at 114 NW 4th Street, the N.E. corner of NW 1st Avenue and NW 4th Street. It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy and Croft. It was still standing in 1974, when A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" was first published. An early picture of the building appears on page 129 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells." It was demolished in the late 1980's or early 1990's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20339/
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20338/
[Mineral Wells, Texas 1881]
This is a photograph of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken in 1881. (Please observe that the picture carries a copyright by A. F. Weaver.) It is the earliest picture of Mineral Wells available. It was mailed to A.F. Weaver by a woman in Colorado, who found it in her great-grandfather's (James Bevan) belongings, in 2004. The late relative was a world traveler, and spent only a short time in Mineral Wells. The photograph was obtained too late to be included in the last edition (the mini edition) of TIME WAS... James Alvis Lynch and his family arrived in Millsap Valley December 24, 1877. He dug a well to 41 feet in 1878, but it was dry. He contracted to have another well drilled in 1880, and it encountered mineral water. The water acquired renown for its medicinal quality. It fetched health-seekers to what would later be Mineral Wells by the thousands. Lynch laid out the city of Mineral Wells on his 80-acre farm in 1881. The unidentified lines of white objects in the upper background are a mystery, but are probably tents. H.M. Berry, an early resident, and Mineral Wells' first school teacher, wrote in 1921, " . . .by the first of October (1881) it looked like a small army was camped here, tents were everywhere." The Lynch cabins, site of the mineral water discovery well, is in the grove of trees at the middle left of the picture. A note on the photographer: James Bevan was born in Lancashire, England, but spent much of his life traveling in the United States (where, presumably, he took this photograph), Australia and Africa. He was acquainted with Cecil Rhodes, whom he reputedly disliked. He cured a Zulu chief of severe constipation, and was made blood brother to him in gratitude. Mr. Bevan would have been put to death (along with the attending witch doctor) upon the event of failure to cure. He spent little time in America. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20337/
[The Star House]
The Star House was built about 1900, and owned by Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Ramsey. This 34-room hotel, situated at 315 Coke Street,(since re-named NW 2nd Street), was one of Mineral Wells' early hotels. The Star House also operated the Star Well, located 2 blocks east of the hotel on Mesquite Street (now NE 2nd Avenue), north of the current Baker Hotel. The Star House was destroyed by fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20336/
Pal-Pinto-Crystal Wells Bath House
The Pal-Pinto Crystal Wells Bath House is illustrated here, although its location is unknown. Thelma Doss wrote in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" that, "It was a long, rambling structure with a large number of rooms for bathing purposes for both ladies and gentleman. There was a grand selection of baths such as Plain, Turkish, Salt Glow, Russian Massage, and Vapor baths. This large rambling structure looked more like a house for a large family than a business." This picture occurs on page 65 of A. F. Weaver's book in both First and Second Editions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20335/
[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]
The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20334/
[The Mercer House]
A note on the back of the picture indicates that the Mercer House was built in 1905, and the accompanying description indicates that it was a boarding house operated by Mr. A. S. Mercer and family. The 1909 Polk Directory lists Mssrs. Mercer and Robinson as proprietors. It was located at 210 North Wichita Street [in 2008, NW 1st Avenue], convenient to the leading bath houses, wells, pavilions, and the Mineral Wells Post Office. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20332/
The Woodruff Cottage
Copy around this picture states that the Woodruff Cottage was built by a Civil War veteran who came to Mineral Wells for his health in 1903. His health improved so much, writes the copy, that he decided to build a fine home here with rooms for visitors. A note on the back of the picture indicates the "Cottage" was opened in 1905. The copy also states that it was located one block north of the Crazy and Carlsbad wells, and became quite popular because of its convenient location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20331/
The Oaks
The Oaks, at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, burned in 1908 along with the Presbyterian Church. The church steeple can be seen at the left. A later view of the building (with concrete sidewalks) is found on page 103 of A. F. Weaver's 1974 book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20320/
[The Lamar Bath House, Lamar Annex]
This picture is the Annex to the Lamar Bath House, and was located south of the first Methodist Church. The first bath house in Mineral Wells (at Dubellett's French Well) was located northeast of the Methodist Church, and was a neighbor to the Lamar property. The White Sulphur Well, operated by a Mr. Ligon, was located across the street--south of the Methodist Church--and sold in 1891. The Lamar Well and Bath House was developed at this time, and served water under the White Sulfur label. The Lamar property became part of the Baker Hotel property when the hotel was built and opened in 1929. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20327/
[A Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells is shown here. The picture is a composite of two views taken from East Mountain. Attached to the composite is a date "1901." The large building in the front middle of the picture is the Holloway & Haley livery stable. Some of the buildings are numbered on the photograph. Recognizable are: (2) The Hawthorn Well, with steeple (Right middle of the picture), (4) The original Crazy water drinking pavilion (two-story with smaller upper third floor, right middle of picture), The Lythia Well (between the Crazy Well and the Hawthorn Well), and The Hexagon House at the far right edge of picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20324/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells, Texas]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken by A. F. Weaver on April 29, 1967 looks North on Oak Avenue. Identifiable in the picture are the Baker Hotel to the middle right of the picture, The Crazy Hotel in the middle left, the old Post Office (now the Ladies Club) one block north of The Baker, and the Nazareth Hospital (one block left of The Crazy Hotel). Also in the picture are now-destroyed buildings: The Damron Hotel (just left of center), the Baker Water Storage Building (mid-upper right, small white building just to right of Baker Hotel), the Oxford Hotel (just right of center, now [2008] Lynch Plaza) and the Convention Hall(upper left). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20212/
The Curtis House
The Curtis House was an early hotel at 315 E. Hubbard Street, where the Baker Hotel swimming pool is now [2008] located. This picture was handed down through the Curtis family to Robert Curtis, who donated it to A.F. Weaver June 25, 1996. A later view of the hotel is found on page 101 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20293/
The Commercial Hotel
The Commercial Hotel, one of the early hotels in Mineral Wells, was located on South Oak Avenue, where the Mineral Wells Fire Department is now [2014] located. The Cutter Guide of 1893 states that the hotel was recently completed. It is listed as being "[T]wo blocks from the depot [and] 1 block [away] from the post-office [sic]." This picture may be found on page 101 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20318/
Cliff Home
The Cliff Home, an early Mineral Wells hotel, stood on NE 2nd Street (formerly Coke Street) just east of the head of NE 1st Avenue (formerly Mesquite Street), and the site of the 1912 "Old Post Office" (now the Women's Club.) The hotel burned down, and the Plateau Hotel was built in its place. That hotel, in time, became The Exchange Hotel. It was later converted to the Mineral Wells Sanitarium (or hospital) before it was finally torn down. The significance of the small "E" between "CLIFF" and "HOME" on the sign painted on the roof is unclear. The back of the photograph bears the name "Henry Sikes" (a banker in Graford, and probably the donor of the picture) written in ink, and a business stamp, "S.B. Hall, General Photographer." This picture is found on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20315/
[The Foster Hotel]
A note on the back of this picture identifies it as the Foster House. It was located at 202 NW 6th Street (given in Polk's Directory for 1909 as "202 West Moore", two blocks north of the Crazy Well) and facing 6th Street. It was one block west of the Hexagon House, and within two blocks of other wells. The style of the building appears to be Queen Anne, spindle-work subtype, with paired gables. The number "2231" is written on the photograph. A railroad ran a main trunk line on the other side of the hotel's block. It was built before 1904 but further history of this early hotel is not known at this time [2008]. Another picture (The Foster Hotel: Second Photograph, which please see) supplies a few more details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20313/
The Famous Water Pavilion--Damron Hotel
The Famous Water Wells maintained a pavilion in the lobby of the Damron Hotel, where guests could partake of mineral water. This hotel was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and SW 1st Street. It burned down in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20310/
The Wagley Bath House and Annex
The Wagley Bath House and Annex (originally called "The Bimini") was located at 114 NW 4th Street. Dr. Wagley also owned and operated a pharmacy in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20308/
The Bethesda Bath House
The Bethesda Bath House was formerly located 406 N. Oak, with the top of the front of Chautauqua to the northeast of the bath house, visible over the top of the bath house roof's gable at the left side of the building. The Bethesda Bath House apparently contained the office of Dr. G. W. Hubbard. Bathing in the mineral waters was considered a health treatment, and was recommended by local doctors. There is a structure seen behind the bath house in the lower right quadrant of the photograph. This may have been the doctor's residence. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20307/
The Avalon
The Avalon Hotel was located at NW 3rd Street and NW 3rd Avenue. Assembled here in front of the hotel is a group of people, possibly hotel guests. A reversed-image of this picture appears on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20306/
[The Sangcura Sprudel Fire]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well drinking pavilion was originally located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. It was moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches on the building were enclosed, and it was converted to a rooming house. It burned December 5, 1973, just five minutes before the start of the Mineral Wells Christmas Parade. The remaining part of the Period Hotel on N.W. 4th Avenue, which also burned at another date, was converted into apartments that can be seen through the smoke in the upper left of the picture. This photograph is found on page 64 of A.F Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells,"' First Edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20304/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 20 of 21: Different View of the Fire]
Shown here is yet another view of fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975 is shown here. The hotel was located in the 109 W. Hubbard Street. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, which was in the same building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20302/
[A Letter from Mrs. William Wehunt to A.F. Weaver]--dated to about 2002
The letter shown is from "Mrs. William Wehunt", who was the former Katherine Brookshire, whose father owned a furniture store in Mineral Wells. The bank referred to in the letter is believed to have been the Bank of Mineral Wells, that failed in 1924. It had been Mineral Wells' first bank. The Brookshire family of Mineral Wells is believed to be distantly related to the founder of the chain of Brookshire grocery stores. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20300/