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[The Second Post Office]

[The Second Post Office]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture illustrates the building that housed the second Post Office in Mineral Wells. It was located at 2310 SE 1st Avenue. Note the men: Four of them are in shirt-sleeves, and two are properly dressed (for the era) in jackets. None exhibit the "Cowboy" image of the nineteenth century, so popular in the late twentieth century. Note also the complete lack of automobiles. The picture appears to have been taken possibly in the 1890's (?) It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on p. 149.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[First State Bank & Trust]

[First State Bank & Trust]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is an interior view of the First State Bank & Trust Company, later known as the State National Bank, located at 102 East Hubbard. This bank was organized in 1906, and it became the State National Bank in 1925. The First National Bank was merged with the State National Bank in 1931. The official name of the institution became First National Bank in 1955. At the desk is H. N. Frost, then president. Standing is W. I. Smith, Vice-President & cashier. The teller is unidentified. The photograph was taken 1921. It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 147.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Bank of Mineral Wells]

[Bank of Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the interior of the Bank of Mineral Wells. Collie Smith, L.E. Hamen, and someone named only "O'Neal" are shown in the cages. The bank went out of business in 1924. The building was then used by Ball Drugs, and then by Massengale's Appliances. The building was eventually torn down, to make room for a parking in the downtown area. It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 148.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Construction of Oxford Hotel]

[Construction of Oxford Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Pictured here is the construction of the foundation of the Oxford Hotel (including the First State Bank & Trust Company) in 1906. The hotel was located at Oak and Hubbard Streets. H. N. Frost, father of Cleo T. Bowman and grandfather of Frost Bowman, built the Oxford and founded the bank, which was located on the west side of the building. Some few of the buildings pictured are still [2014] standing. The hotel was owned by the estate until the late 1920's. The Oxford Hotel met its doom by fire in later years. This photograph is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 147.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The First National Bank]

[The First National Bank]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The First National Bank was organized about 1900 by Cicero Smith. It was located on the corner of Mesquite & Throckmorton Streets (Now, [2013] Southeast 1st Avenue and Northeast 1st Streets). The Index Printing Company is visible in the rear of the building. Fourteen men (and no women) are shown around the building, all dressed in three-piece suits--including the two lounging on the steps of the Index. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 146.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Aerial View of Camp Wolters

Aerial View of Camp Wolters

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The only information about this photograph appears to be the written legends on it: [At its top] MW-4 AERIAL VIEW OF CAMP WOLTERS, TEXAS [At its bottom] PHOTO BY AERIAL PHOTO SERVICE KALAMAZOO--DALLAS 1B-H586 Camp Wolters was the predecessor of Fort Wolters in Mineral Wells.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Camp Wolters Headquarters; Polio Association]

[Camp Wolters Headquarters; Polio Association]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: [The caption page is, unfortunately, partially destroyed] Headqu[......](lacuna)[..]lters Camp Wolters, Texas--Major General [............](lacuna), Command[..] (lacuna) Infantry Replacement Center at Camp Wolters, pres.(lacuna) for [deletion] $453 to Irl Prerston, treasurer of the Palo Pinto Co(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association, as Capt. Harry P. Sheldon, (lacuna) of the Camp Wolters Officers Mess & William P. Cameron, Pa(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association chairman, look on. The c(lacuna) the contribution of Camp Wolters officers to the infantile para[.](lacuna) as the result of a [deletion] President's Birthday Ball held (lacuna) at the officers [sic] mess. The sum [deletion] complements $281 raised by citizens of Mineral Wells at the President's Ball in the city. [signed] Sidney Miller
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]

[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: An aerial View of Mineral Wells Municipal Airport and Downing Heliport is shown here. Further information about them is not yet available.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Formation of OH-23 Helicopters]

[Formation of OH-23 Helicopters]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Illustrated in this photograph is a formation of OH-23 Helicopters, presumably at Fort Wolters. Information in regard to the occasion of their flight, or any other data on the helicopters,is unfortunately lacking.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Kitchens & Mess Halls, Camp Wolters

Kitchens & Mess Halls, Camp Wolters

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A legend on the bottom of the photograph clearly reads: Left: Top, Entrance to Camp Wolters. Bottom, Kitchens and Mess Halls, Camp Wolters." It shows seven rock-faced buildings with a curb in front of them. Ash cans, and trash repositories--also rock-faced--are visible on left. Five men--unidentified--stand around. The date of the photograph has not been preserved, but Camp Wolters was the World War I and World War II predecessor of what was changed to Fort Wolters during the Vietnam Era.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library