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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1910-1919
[A View of Mineral Wells]

[A View of Mineral Wells]

Date: January 11, 1919
Creator: unknown
Description: A panoramic view of Mineral Wells, possibly taken from East Mountain. This picture was sent to A.F. Weaver, in 1975, from Charles Windell Simonds of Norman, Oklahoma, with a note indicating they were taken by his father (Clarence Winfield Simonds) on January 11,1919. The view appears to be from East Mountain looking southwest. A power plant is visible in the right center of this picture, but other landmarks have not been identified.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Dalton]

[Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Dalton]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: "Mr. & Mrs. R.S. Dalton on their 50th Wedding Anniversary as held in the second wooden structure of the First Baptist Church. Presiding is The Reverend Mr. Harlan Matthews." Robert (Bob) Dalton's father, Marcus L. Dalton, was killed by Indians on the Ft. Worth-Ft. Belknap military road in northeastern Palo Pinto County in 1870. Bob Dalton discovered the Dalton Oil Field on his ranch in north central Palo Pinto County, and the boom town that sprang up there was named Dalton City after him. He later moved to southwest Mineral Wells before building a large home, adorned with native rock, on 2101 NW 4th Avenue.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Children With Bicycle and Hoop,]

[Children With Bicycle and Hoop,]

Date: January 10, 1919
Creator: unknown
Description: Dated "Jan 10, 1919", this picture was contained in an envelope postmarked "Aug. 4 '75", and addressed to A. F. Weaver Photography from Charles W. [Windell] Simonds. Handwriting on the envelope indicates it was from a short-wave "Ham' radio operator correspondent and friend of Mr. Weaver. Notes on the envelope indicate the picture was probably taken by the correspondent's father, Clarence Winfield Simonds. The sign on the tree at the left edge of the picture indicates this was the Vance Villa (Rooming House) in a residential part of town. (Vance Villa is listed in the 1914 City Director of Mineral Wells at 811 N. College, which is now NW 5th Avenue.) Note the hoop held by the child on the left, while the boy on the right appears to be holding a unicycle.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Crazy Flats and First Crazy Hotel]

[The Crazy Flats and First Crazy Hotel]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of early Mineral Wells from East Mountain shows the Crazy Flats in the foreground, and the first Crazy Hotel at the left, at the rear of it. The small building at the right, rear of the Crazy Flats housed the "Crazy Woman's Well" that contributed the generic "Crazy Water" name to the local mineral water. Crazy Flats, the second Crazy Drinking Pavilion with "Rooms for Rent" on the second floor, was built in 1909. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections: The first section, at the left rear of Crazy Flats, was built in 1912, and the second section, left of it, was built in 1914, and joined to the first with a common lobby. The low building to the left of Crazy Flats and in front of the Hotel was the Crazy Bath House and Drugstore. A fire started in the drugstore March 15, 1925, and destroyed the entire city block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering this entire city block, opened in 1927. The original Crazy Well is now situated in the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Hotel with a cover over it. The second Crazy Hotel is now [2008] a Retirement Home. ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]

[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]

Date: 1913
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the First Crazy Hotel Lobby in 1913. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections; the first section, which contained this lobby, was built in 1912. The second section was added in 1914, and joined to the first with the two sections sharing this same sky-lighted lobby. A fire on March 15, 1925 destroyed the first Crazy Hotel along with all the other businesses in this block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering the entire city block, opened in 1927. It is now [2008] a retirement home.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The First Crazy Hotel]

[The First Crazy Hotel]

Date: 1913
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the front of the first Crazy Hotel, which was destroyed by fire March 15, 1925. Built in two stages and joined together, the first (back) section was built in 1912, and the second (front) section was completed in 1914. A handwritten note on back of photograph states, "Crazy Hotel 1913. Front of Hotel Facing South Mineral Wells, Tx." This picture is included on page 15 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS...", and was probably taken before the second section of the hotel opened for business. The back of Crazy Flats (the second Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion) can be seen to the right, north of and behind the hotel in this picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

[The Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: Spectators are shown here, at a spring play-day frolic at Elmhurst Park around 1910. The popular park once boasted a Casino, a Dancing Pavilion, Exhibit Halls, and Outdoor Sports Fields. It hosted the County Fair and sports events until 1913. On the closure of Elmhurst Park, the City of Mineral Wells became the owner of the property. It was used for a housing development during World War II to accommodate families of soldiers and civilian workers at Camp Wolters. The City of Mineral Wells built city's water treatment facilities on the site of the former park after World War II.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Farmer's Market at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

[Farmer's Market at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph, printed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS IN Mineral Wells..." on page 88, illustrates a display of fruit jars at the Mineral Wells Fair, held at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park. Canned fruits and vegetables were customarily entered in Palo Pinto County's annual fall harvest fair. Elmhurst Park hosted the fair, among other popular events during its heyday. The popularity of personal automobile transportation about 1913 made transit by street car unprofitable, and the park closed shortly after the street cars were discontinued. The City of Mineral Wells' water treatment facilities are now located in the southwest part of town, on the former Elmhurst Park property.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Health Resort Quarterly, 1 of 4, Cover

The Health Resort Quarterly, 1 of 4, Cover

Date: October 1915
Creator: unknown
Description: The cover of The (October 1915) Health Resort Quarterly, published by the Commercial Club of Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The wreath on the cover frames a lady's arm and hand holding a glass of (mineral) water with captions "ANALYSIS HAS PROVED IT TO HAVE NO EQUAL" above and "FAMED THE WORLD OVER" below, referring to the mineral water from the local wells. A colophon at bottom reads: "Index Print [symbol] Mineral Wells."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Health Resort Quarterly, 2 of 4:  Page 1

The Health Resort Quarterly, 2 of 4: Page 1

Date: October 1915
Creator: Burman, Fred
Description: The Health Resort Quarterly was published by the Commercial Club, located at 106 East Wall Street (now NE 4th Street). This volume was published October, 1915. Officers were: J.C Pangle, President; Dr. J.H McCracken, Vice President; W.I. Smith, Treasurer and Fred Burman, Secretary. The publication contained words of wisdom, advertisements extolling Mineral Wells, and items of local news.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library