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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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[ The Star House]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60888/
[The Building of Fort Wolters]
An automobile--presumably of the late 1930's--is parked by a building in the process of being built. Workmen may be seen at the site. A legend under the original reads: "Buildings seem to literally spring from the earth when the construction of the then Camp Wolters began in November, 1940. The camp was completed in less than four months and became the nation's largest infantry Replacement Training Center. Construction cost was approximately $14,200,000." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60911/
Inside a Howard Department Store
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60917/
The Original Baptist Church Building at SW 4th Avenue
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60897/
The Fairfield Hotel
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60885/
[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]
The gazebo-like structure shown in the picture protects a water pump in front of the Milling Sanitarium. The sanitarium was built about 1929 on what was then the 2500 block of SE Sixth Avenue. It later became the Irvine Sanitarium. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (Post 2399) occupies the building as of 2010. The fate of the structure shown here is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60948/
Howard's Hardware Store 1903
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60940/
The Thatch
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60891/
[The Interior of The First National Bank]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60923/
[The Presbyterian Church: First Building]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60896/
[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60942/
[First Country Club]
Illustrated here is a picture of the first Mineral Wells Gold country club, taken about 1950. The picture shows it on the shore of a lake that was located about three miles east of Mineral Wells. Further information is,sadly,lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60919/
[An Unknown Boarding House]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60895/
[First National Bank]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60921/
The Convention Hall and Its Surroundings
This picture shows the quondam Convention Hall in it glory days after its erection in 1925, and before its demolition in 1976. A house in the (possibly)the Colonial Revival style is visible. Another large house on a hill appears to be in the Neoclassical style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60953/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall: Interior, 3 of 5]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60958/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 5 of 5]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60959/
Baker Hotel Swimming Pool
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39156/
[The Baker Hotel at Night]
[Baker Hotel at Night. Cars parked on street. Wind blows through trees.] Legend: Photo & colorized by A. F. Weaver 1940 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39155/
[John Mathiews Inspects a Well]
John Mathiews, owner of the Crazy Hotel, inspects the first known Crazy Water well under the sidewalk of the northwest corner of the present [2012] Crazy Hotel. The photograph was taken in 1974.It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 29. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39157/
[The Baker Hotel Roof Garden]
This photograph is identified as "Baker Hotel Roof Garden February 1999." Two chandeliers are still in place on the ceiling, but the missing floor boards, the peeling paint, and the deserted condition of the room is indicative of the sad condition of once a beautiful ballroom. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39163/
Jack Amlung
The band in this photograph is identified as "Jack Amlung." It consists of nine players, including its leader. The instruments visible are: A sousaphone; two (?)pianos; a violin; an alto saxophone; a clarinet, a guitar, a bass viol; percussion. Further information about this band is, sadly, lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39164/
[Excavation for the Baker]
Excavation work and clearing of the two blocks in downtown Mineral Wells for the Baker Hotel is shown here. In the background is the Dr. Thompson home, the old First Methodist church and parsonage. The parsonage was moved to the corner of SE 3rd Street & SE 5th Avenue. The filling station in the foreground was located where Murray's Grill parking lot once was [ca. 1950]. The Piedmont Hotel was across the street (NE 1st Avenue.) where the Baker Hotel garage building is now [2009]located. The work has just begun clearing the lots. The tower on top of East Mountain is barely visible above the welcome sign that was erected there in 1925. This photograph comes from the Young collection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39166/
[The Arlington Hotel]
The Arlington Hotel--the largest hotel in Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas--with its famous thermal baths, is shown here. It is under the regulation of the United States Government. There is a beautiful "Cascade" swimming pool for guests. This picture is taken from a POST CARD titled "Plastichrome [Registered] by COLOURPICTURES, INC. Boston, 10, Massachusetts U.S.A." This hotel was said to be the model for the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39167/
[Building of the Baker Hotel]
Construction of the Baker HOTEL. [sic], which opened on November 22nd,1929 It was the work of Wyatt C. Hendricks, and Company, Architects. A legend on the back of the photograph states: "Unknown man looks on. Photograph taken approximately from site of Methodist church, looking towards the southwest." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39169/
[A Train Depot]
George and Daurice O'Neil purchased the depot,and their son Don helped with the restoration. It is now [2008] used as office rental. Elliot & Waldron Title Company and Gault, Attorney-at-Law, are leasing space there. The building is listed on the National registry in Washington [D.C.] and it sports a Texas Historical Marker. It is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 190. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39171/
[The Interior of a Grocery Store]
A legend on the back of the photograph reads: "D.M. Howard Grocery Simon Gilbert on Left Great Uncle of Estes Gilbert" A different hand has written "2nd is D. M. Howard himself" Please notice the mustaches on nearly all the gentlemen pictured. Please notice also that all of the men but two are wearing jackets. The store shows no sign of electric lighting. There may be a gas fixture at the left edge of the picture, which, along with the appearance of the men, may serve to indicate that the photograph was taken in the early part of the twentieth century, but definite information on this issue is lacking. The picture is featured in "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39172/
[Palo Pinto General Hospital]
Palo Pinto General Hospital opened in 1970 and is located west of Mineral Wells. It has been, since this picture was taken, enlarged and remodeled extensively. This hospital replaced the downtown Nazareth Hospital. While the hospital was been built, the first two floors of the Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 168. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39173/
[Inside the Electric & Ice Plant]
The old Electric and Ice Plant was once located on S.W. 1st Avenue. This photograph was taken around 1908. Pictured is D. L. Austin, father of Myrtle Butler. It is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 83, in reversed form. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39174/
[A Building Being Demolished]
This building, once the second Post Office, had stood at the corner of 201 SE 1st Avenue and Hubbard Street. This building was subsequently demolished, and a Piggly Wiggly grocery store was located there. As of March 2, 2009, the site was occupied by the Dollar General Store. This picture may be found in A.F. Weaver's "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on p. 149 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39175/
The [Old] City Hall
This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39176/
Montgomery Ward & Co.
The front of the photograph obviously reads: Montgomery Ward & Co. A hand-written legend reads: Mineral Wells, Texas Aug 24th 1929 The back reads: North Oak Ave. Built in 1929 Copyright A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39178/
Paving Brick Plant
Shown here is a photograph of the Paving Brick Plant. In the lower right-hand corner is the legend: Young Studio Mineral Wells, Tex." It was established in 1921; electrified in 1925-1926; the company was sold in 1927, re-named "Reliance Brick Company." It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 162. Electrification was accomplished when the Texas Power and Light Company furnished an abandoned 500 h.p. stream-power plant for the job. It was fed natural gas by means of the Upham Gas Company's line. In 1927, the plant was the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi River, confining its production exclusively to vitrified shale material. The manager in 1927 has been identified as A. E. Eaton, who was also instrumental in locating the plant in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39179/
[A Man, A Woman and a Portrait]
Ruby Shattles (Mrs. Jesse Shattles) presents a portrait of Achilles Corcanges to Mr. Corcanges, founder & owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studios at 412 North Oak. This picture may be found in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39180/
U.S. O. Club, Mineral Wells, Texas
The only information available about this photograph is solely the legend on it, identifying it as the U.S.O. Club of Mineral Wells, Texas. Further details in regard to this club would be welcome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39182/
D. M. Howard Millinery Department
The D. M. Howard Department Store was once located at 101 SW 1st Street. This photograph illustrates its millinery department. The portly gentleman on the far left has been identified as D. M. Howard himself. The identities of the five ladies, the girl, and the remaining gentleman have not been discovered. If one may judge by the clothes of the people shown in the picture, it is conjectured that the photograph was taken within the first two decades of the twentieth century. Five Howard brothers came from North Carolina to settle in Palo Pinto County. D. M. was the first one to come He later sent for his other brothers. The first Howard buildings were at the northeast corner of Oak & Hubbard Streets, facing Hubbard. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39186/
[Sam Whatley & Mr. & Mrs. Evans Holland ]
Sam Whatley (left), representing Young Motor Company, presents a check to Mr. & Mrs. Evans Holland (right) for the winning slogan, "Cadillac Every Time for Better Motor Service." Sam was service manager for the motor company, located at 316 East Hubbard Street. The picture is featured in "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on page 185. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39187/
[The Interior of a Barbershop]
This photograph shows of the early-day barber shops in Mineral Wells. The persons shown and the location of it are unknown. Please observe the point on the bottom of the best-illustrated light bulb. A legend on the photograph dates it to 1905; however, calendars in the picture show April. April 1st fell on a Sunday in 1906. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39188/
[Garett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches]
Shown here are Bill Garrett (left) and Walter Dalton (right), proprietors of Garrett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches. It was once located at 110 S.E. 1st Street. Th picture was taken around 1920. It may be seen in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 128. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39189/
[The Birch McClendon Food Store]
The only information about this picture comes from a legend on the back of it: Mrs. Vernon Hill father & n gof [sic] Chester Claywell Mr. Lord. grocery [illegible] Specialty Shop [written vertically] DW Griffith It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 128 as "Birch McClendon Food Store, located at 211 Southeast 1st Street." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39192/
Post Offfice, Mineral Wells, Texas, 1930 (?)
This building once housed the third Post Office in Mineral Wells. The body of the photograph is marked POST OFFICE MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS 1936. Please observe the automobiles parked in front, on the sloping street. It was the issue of insufficient parking that caused the Post Office to move. The building presently [2013] houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39194/
[Thelma Doss Interviews Claude Gardner]
Thelma Doss interviews the writer Claude Garner on KORC Radio. Looking on are (left) W. Lions; (center) Corcanges [founder & owner of the station]; (right)Orval Shore. KORC radio broadcast first on December 5, 1946. Its name was changed to KJSA-AM in 1973. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39195/
[The Joe Russel Service Station]
This picture shows the Joe Russell Gulf Service Station, once at 501 N. Oak. Note the two frowning men in uniforms, indicating that this was a complete-service operation--virtually extinct in this age [2013]. Further information about the identities of the two men--or the fate of the service station--is not known. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39198/
[Mineral Wells Steam Laundry]
The only information available in regard to this photograph is a legend on the back of it that reads: "200 block of NW 7th St." The sign on the false front of the building clearly reads, "Mineral Steam Laundry." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39199/
[A Guest Room in the Baker Hotel]
This photograph shows a guest room in the Baker Hotel, when it was operating. Please note the corner sofa, shag carpet, round coffee-table. Please note also the smoking stand at one end of the sofa--an amenity not seen in modern hotel rooms. The decor suggests the late 1950's or the early 1960's. It is said that the door of the room had an apparatus in it that automatically turned off the lights when the key was turned. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39200/
Entrance to Camp Wolters; Kitchens & Mess Halls
A legend on the bottom of the photograph clearly reads: Left: Top, Entrance to Camp Wolters. Bottom, Kitchens and Mess Halls, Camp Wolters." It shows seven rock-faced buildings with a curb in front of them. Ash cans, and trash repositories--also rock-faced--are visible on left. Five men--unidentified--stand around. The date of the photograph has not been preserved, but Camp Wolters was the World War I predecessor of the later Fort Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39201/
[Formation of OH-23 Helicopters]
Illustrated in this photograph is a formation of OH-23 Helicopters, presumably at Fort Wolters. Information in regard to the occasion of their flight, or any other data on the helicopters,is unfortunately lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39202/
[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]
An aerial View of Mineral Wells Municipal Airport and Downing Heliport is shown here. Further information about them is not yet available. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39203/
[Camp Wolters Headquarters; Polio Association]
[The caption page is, unfortunately, partially destroyed] Headqu[......](lacuna)[..]lters Camp Wolters, Texas--Major General [............](lacuna), Command[..] (lacuna) Infantry Replacement Center at Camp Wolters, pres.(lacuna) for [deletion] $453 to Irl Prerston, treasurer of the Palo Pinto Co(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association, as Capt. Harry P. Sheldon, (lacuna) of the Camp Wolters Officers Mess & William P. Cameron, Pa(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association chairman, look on. The c(lacuna) the contribution of Camp Wolters officers to the infantile para[.](lacuna) as the result of a [deletion] President's Birthday Ball held (lacuna) at the officers [sic] mess. The sum [deletion] complements $281 raised by citizens of Mineral Wells at the President's Ball in the city. [signed] Sidney Miller texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39204/
Aerial View of Camp Wolters
The only information about this photograph appears to be the written legends on it: [At its top] MW-4 AERIAL VIEW OF CAMP WOLTERS, TEXAS [At its bottom] PHOTO BY AERIAL PHOTO SERVICE KALAMAZOO--DALLAS 1B-H586 Camp Wolters was the predecessor of Fort Wolters in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39205/
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