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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Daily Index
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60962/
A "Famous Mineral Water " Advertisement
This photograph illustrates the title page of a small (3 3/8 inches by 6 1/8 inches) pamphlet of 8 leaves. It contains letters from satisfied users of "Pronto-Lax", a product of the water that made Mineral Wells Famous. Such anecdotal evidence was all that Mineral Wells was capable of producing when the Federal Drug Administration (F.D.A.)demanded scientific evidence of the efficacy of the mineral waters in 1931. The back of the final leaf bears the legend: Mrs. Dola Blaffer 3412 Knight St. Phone 5-6602 Dallas, Tex. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60961/
The Period Hotel
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60886/
[ The Star House]
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The Methodist- Episcopal Church
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60893/
The Cumberland Presbyterian Church
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The Oaks
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Mineral Wells is 100% for "Ike" Sablosky
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60926/
Crazy Water and Crystals Display
As the caption reads, a display of Crazy Water and Crazy Crystals in the front entrance of the plant that manufactured them is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60928/
[The Building of Fort Wolters]
An automobile--presumably of the late 1930's--is parked by a building in the process of being built. Workmen may be seen at the site. A legend under the original reads: "Buildings seem to literally spring from the earth when the construction of the then Camp Wolters began in November, 1940. The camp was completed in less than four months and became the nation's largest infantry Replacement Training Center. Construction cost was approximately $14,200,000." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60911/
Mineral Wells Hardware
The sign painted on the side of the store proclaims that this building is the Mineral Wells Hardware Company. Located at 212 SE 1st Avenue, it was owned by Mssrs. Smith & Frost. It was later bought by L.E. Seaman. In 1975, it became the location of Widlake Motor Supply. The picture appears on page 126 of A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60915/
Ellis White Shows Off the Book About Mineral Wells
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60905/
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60945/
[Three Old-Time Stores]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60925/
Sanitarium
The Mineral Wells Sanitarium was located at 315 NW 1st Avenue. It was later owned and operated by B.H. Milling before he built the Milling Sanitarium. The building was torn down and replaced by Willimann's Pharmacy. Currently [2010] the Woodsmen of the World club resides at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60880/
Crazy Water
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60929/
Crazy Water Bottling and Crazy Crystals Plant 1940
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Roundtree Sanitarium
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Hubbard Street: About 1925
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Central Christian Church
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60894/
The Crazy Radio Theatre
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Inside a Howard Department Store
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The Bank of Mineral Wells
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The Original Baptist Church Building at SW 4th Avenue
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Minutes of the Bicentennial Committee
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The Fairfield Hotel
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60885/
[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]
The gazebo-like structure shown in the picture protects a water pump in front of the Milling Sanitarium. The sanitarium was built about 1929 on what was then the 2500 block of SE Sixth Avenue. It later became the Irvine Sanitarium. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (Post 2399) occupies the building as of 2010. The fate of the structure shown here is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60948/
Milling's Sanitarium
Milling's Sanitarium was built H.H. Milling, son of Roscoe Gorman Milling (a/k/a "The Indian Adept", a/k/a "The Long-haired Doctor"), about 1929 on the Old Millsap Highway. It was later renamed Irvine Sanitarium. The building (at 1400 SE VFW Highway--a branch of SE 6th Avenue, at about the 2500 block) now [2011] houses Post 2399 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Some of the information about this picture was taken from taken from A. F. Weaver's book "Time Was in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 129. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60947/
The Crazy Well Water Company
This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. The recto folio describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60936/
[The Foster Hotel]
This picture depicts a hotel--done in Queen Anne style (Spindle-work subtype). Please note the unusual two-story wraparound porch, also with spindle-work. It appears to have been excerpted from a fragment of advertising copy that gives the name of the building as "The Foster", and extols the owner (Mr. T.J. Foster) as "...an old hotel hand of large acquaintance and wide experience, who has studied the wants and needs of his guests[,] and loses no opportunity of making them comfortable." Polk's Directory for 1910 lists the proprietor of the hotel as F. J. Kowalski. A hand-written note on the edge of the negative (not visible in the picture) states: "NW 1st Ave 6th Street." This address is only approximate. A more accurate address is given in the photograph "The Foster Hotel", also to be found in this collection. Although it is not certain, the clothes of the people shown standing around the hotel strongly suggest that the picture was taken early in the twentieth century. A barely-legible colophon, appearing to read "FONE" appears in the lower left-hand corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60881/
Howard's Hardware Store 1903
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60940/
Dry Goods--W.H.H.Hightower
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The Period Hotel and Annex
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The Thatch
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Colonial Hotel
The Colonial Hotel at 115 W. Hubbard Street was built by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, and its name was changed to The Damron Hotel. The popular hotel burned down December 22, 1975 along with several other adjoining businesses. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60882/
Crazy Well at Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is the Crazy Well drinking pavilion, as it appeared around 1908, looking at the North and East (back) sides, after remodeling and the removal of a residence. The house was removed still stands at 715 NW 1st Avenue. The photograph was taken across Oak Avenue. Note the top of the first Texas Carlsbad Well in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60933/
[An Early View of Mesquite Street]
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[A Crazy Water "Oxidine" Bottle Label]
A bottle label for Oxidine (apparently a medication for malaria), manufactured by the Crazy Water Company, with directions for use, is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60930/
[A Crazy Hotel Brochure]
This photograph illustrates a fold-out brochure of the Crazy Hotel with various scenic views of things to see and do around the city, along with different modes of transportation to and from Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60934/
[ A Crazy Hotel Pamphlet]
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City Meat Market
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The Final page of the Minutes of the Bicentennial Committee, 1975
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60938/
[The Interior of The First National Bank]
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[The Presbyterian Church: First Building]
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The Davis Wells; The Davis Baths
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60884/
[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]
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A Label of Mineral Water
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Howard-&-White Dry-Goods Department
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[First Country Club]
Illustrated here is a picture of the first Mineral Wells Gold country club, taken about 1950. The picture shows it on the shore of a lake that was located about three miles east of Mineral Wells. Further information is,sadly,lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60919/
[An Unknown Boarding House]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60895/