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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]

[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]

Date: August 1975
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph shows the purchaser who bought the first copy of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", and his wife. Left to right are: Rev. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Jack Dickens, purchaser; A.F. Weaver, author; Mrs. Jean Dickens. Copy Number One sold for $153.57. (H. Arthur Zappe D.D.S., bought copy Number Two for $45, and Bill Bennett bought copy Number Three for an undisclosed price.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Scene at auction of First Edition of TIME WAS]

[A Scene at auction of First Edition of TIME WAS]

Date: August 1975
Creator: unknown
Description: Attendants at an auction of the First Edition of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" shown here, are, left to right: Mrs. Richard Warren;, Mrs. Morris Thompkins; Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; Mr. A.F. Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore; Auctioneer.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The TIME WAS Book Auction]

[The TIME WAS Book Auction]

Date: August 1975
Creator: unknown
Description: The auction of first edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." The men in picture were: (left to right) the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Art Weaver, author; H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, Mayor of Mineral Wells; and Frost Bowman, Banker. The Reverend Mr. Moore was pastor of the First Baptist Church at the time. Mr. Weaver was a photographer, and the first president of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Dr. Zappe was a dentist, and Mr. Bowman was a Director of Mineral Wells Heritage Association.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Stamps & Phillipt  [sic] Demonstrating  Their Automobile

Stamps & Phillipt [sic] Demonstrating Their Automobile

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Stamps and Phillips, inventors, demonstrating their Storm Alarm invention. Note that "Phillips" is spelled with one "l" and a "t" on the hand-written caption. The car is sitting in front of the second Carlsbad drinking pavilion on W. Watts Street (now NW 4th Street.) The photograph was taken during the 1920's.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
First State Bank & Trust Company

First State Bank & Trust Company

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The First State Bank and Trust Company and the Oxford Hotel were located at the corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets. The building burned in 1983. It is now the site of the Lynch Building and Plaza, the site of the first discovered mineral water well in Mineral Wells.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Crazy Well]

[The Crazy Well]

Date: 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture was taken in 1974, looking south on NW 1st Avenue from NW 4th Street, showing the metal cover, in the sidewalk corner, of the Crazy Well. It is full of Crazy water, ready to be pumped out and used. The building on the left is the west side of the present [2008] Crazy Water Retirement Hotel. This information was taken from Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", page 29. This well was the third one dug in Mineral Wells.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Gazebo in West Park]

[A Gazebo in West Park]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A gazebo, built during the 1970-1980's era, is visible through the trees in West City Park. The park is located on US highway 180 (Hubbard Street) where Pollard Creek crosses it--west of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]

[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office

Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office

Date: May 13, 1912
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Crazy Hotel, East Side]

[The Crazy Hotel, East Side]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This photograph was taken in front of the Weaver Photography Studio (412 North Oak)in 1974, and looking west across Oak Street to the Crazy Hotel. The east-side entrance to hotel is clearly visible. The picture was taken before the widening of US Highway 281 through town in year 2005. The automobile at the curb was Mr. Weaver's. The entrance to Crazy drinking water pavilion is on the far right of picture, through a hooded door, under a tile-covered shed roof. It is visible above the hood of the automobile in the foreground. The lobby entrance is beyond the pickup truck, under the "Crazy Hotel" sign. Steps that lead to Mr. Weaver's photography studio are on the front left of the picture. The curved effect of the picture comes from the wide-angle, short focal-length lens that Mr. Weaver used to obtain the photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library