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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[R.L. Polk & Co.'s Mineral Wells City Directory, 1909]
The city directory for Mineral Wells, 1909, embracing a complete alphabetical list of business firms and private citizens; a directory of city and county officials, churches, public and private schools, banks, asylums, hospitals, commercial bodies, secret societies, street and avenue guide, etc. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20207/
[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]
An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16135/
James Alvis Lynch, Founder of Mineral Wells
Photograph of James Alvis Lynch, who founded Mineral Wells in 1881, is wearing a suit, sitting on a donkey, and holding a bottle of mineral water on an unknown rocky hill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16136/
[The Christmas Rush With the First Airmail]
The sorting room of the "old post office" at Christmas time. Airmail had just arrived in Mineral Wells. The caption "1916" is written in the top margin of photograph. Air Mail arrived in Mineral Wells in two distinct eras. The first was from the 1916 date on this photograph to about the beginning of World War II. The mail route of that era was marked by rotating signal beacons for night flight, and low frequency radio directional beams with "A" (dot-dash) and "N" (dash-dot) Morse Code signals to indicate straying, right or left, from the true course between landing fields during flight operations. These deliveries were suspended during World War II, and improved service was resumed for a period of time a few years after the war. At one time during the 1950's-1960's, Trans Texas Airways operated from Shreveport,Louisiana. to El Paso, Texas It made scheduled daily stops in Mineral Wells for both passengers and mail. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16137/
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16139/
[The "Old" Post Office]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16140/
[A Parade With a Rotary Club float]
The Rotary Club float in Mineral Wells' 1976 Bi-Centennial Parade featured riders, in clothes typifying the period, that represent a "Roaring Twenties" golfer dancing with "Flapper Fannies." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16141/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float, depicting the Rock School House in the "Time Was" featured in Bicentennial parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). Built in 1884, it was Mineral Wells' first public school. The float is shown at the corner of Hubbard and North Oak Streets. It was sponsored by the Junior History Club. A sign on the building in the background identifies the Proctor Schneider Insurance Agency. This site was formerly occupied by the First National Bank. The Baker Hotel is in left background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16142/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows a celebrity car in the "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) parade, held April 4, 1976. The passengers riding in the back seat of the 1976 Cadillac El Dorado convertible are The Mayor of Mineral Wells, Ellis White, and his wife, Janie. The picture was taken at the intersection of Oak Street (Highway 281) and Hubbard Avenue (Highway 180) in downtown Mineral Wells. The car is moving south on Oak Street, with the Baker Hotel one block east in background. The camera that took the picture is facing east-northeast. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16143/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
The Rotary Club featured a float during "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bi-Centennial) parade in downtown Mineral Wells, on April 4, 1976. It is moving south on Oak Avenue at the intersection of Oak and Hubbard Streets. Riders on the float depict "flappers" and a golfer of the "Roaring Twenties", dancing to jazz music. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16144/
[Parade at Highways 180 and 281 in Mineral Wells]
The bi-centennial parade, 1976 is shown here in progress. A covered wagon, horses, riders, and parade float are visible in the background. The view is taken from the corner of westbound Hubbard Street, (US Highway 180) at Oak Avenue, (US Highway 281.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16145/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float that appeared, among others, in the "Time was" Bicentennial parade, held on April 4, 1976. It depicts former mineral-water drinking spots in Mineral Wells. Ladies on the float represent customers at some of Mineral Wells' more popular one-time Spas. The wells depicted are: Lynch's discovery-well, the Crazy (Mineral Wells' third and namesake water well), the Gibson Well, the Carlsbad Well, and the Hawthorn Well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16146/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
The Mineral Wells Heritage Association sponsored a float in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates both the publishing of A. F. Weaver's photographic history, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", which was published co-incident with the conversion of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" into a museum, and restoration of the building itself. The ninety-member Mineral Wells Heritage Association was formed to preserve Mineral Wells' first (1884) public school. Mr. Weaver was a director and Charter Member of the Heritage Association, and served as its first President. He was also chairman of the Palo Pinto County Bi-centennial Committee. The parade is pictured going south on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) at the corner of Hubbard Street (US Highway 180). Jeep's "The Thing" automobile is pulling the float. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16147/
[The Mineral Wells High School Band in the Bicentennial Parade]
The Mineral Wells High School Band in the "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade of 1976 (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) is shown here, as taken from a perspective looking northeast at intersection of N. Oak Avenue (Highway 281 left to right) and E. Hubbard Street (Highway 180, one-way right to left.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16148/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float, with women dressed in period clothing, appeared in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (commemorating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates several historical mineral-water drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, including the Lithia, the Gibson, Lynch's mineral well, the Carlsbad, the Crazy, and the Hawthorne. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16149/
[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]
Trees in full foliage (in July of 1975) obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2011] owned by an oculist, Dr. Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16153/
[The Old Matt Skeen Home - 516 NE 4th Avenue]
This is a picture of old Matt Skeen Home at 516 NE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The porch, the face of the gable, and the differing roof lines all suggest later remodeling. Note the unusual candle-snuffer roof of the unusually-placed tower. The picture was taken June of 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16154/
[The Ray Hamilton Home - 1016 SW 7th Avenue]
The Ray Hamilton Home at 1016 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The style is Queen Anne, free classic. Please note the inset arches and the Palladian windows. The style was popular around the turn of the twentieth century. The house shows very slight evidence of remodeling. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16155/
[The Old Katie Ware Home, 911 North. Oak]
The old Katie Ware Home is also shown here. The style appears to be Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-style but it shows signs of extensive remodeling. Note the slightly unusual polygonal tower, and the front porch (which also serves as a car-port)that is level with the ground. It was located at 911 N. Oak Street. The photograph was taken taken during June of 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16156/
[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue
The old Katie Ware Home, of Queen Anne Style, shows possible remodeling. Please note the slightly unusual octagonal tower. Also note the front porch, level with the ground. The building was located at 911 N. Oak Avenue. It has since [2008] been demolished. The picture was taken on taken June of 1974. The picture shows the home from the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16157/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the previous photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16158/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16159/
[The Colonel Boykin Home - 1301 SE 4th Avenue]
The Colonel Boykin Home, at 1301 SE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas appears to show neo-classical elements, along with evidence of later remodeling. This home was built in 1905 by Colonel Walter H. Boykin, owner of the Fairfield Inn. It was later purchased by William Whipple Johnson who, with his brother, Harvey, originally developed the coal mines in Thurber, Texas. Johnson opened the Rock Creek Mine in far western Parker County (after selling the mines at Thurber) and lived in this home while he operated it. The Will Smith family owned the house during the 1930's The house was converted to a rooming house during World War II, and abandoned in later years. The abandoned house was bought in 1975 by Morris Wayne Garrett and his wife, Darlene. They salvaged artifacts from several historical buildings in Mineral Wells that were in the process of being demolished: A beveled-glass door from the old Miller Hotel, large claw-footed bathtubs from the Jerome Hotel, French doors and tall windows from the old Firemen's club at Lake Mineral Wells, and baluster rails which were once part of the Hexagon Hotel, in their efforts to restore the home to its former grandeur. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16160/
[The Penix Home ]
The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16161/
[The Penix House ]
This home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) was once owned by William H. Penix, who was a partner in the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He was also vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style of the house is Queen Anne, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual flat-topped tower on the left of the photograph. Such towers were almost always turreted, flat-tops being practically unknown in this style of architecture. It might not be original; but given the general appearance of the house the condition of the tower might be a testimony to the ravages of time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16162/
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]
This photograph affords a wider view of the house shown in the previous picture. It is of eclectic style, with Prairie, and Neoclassical elements. A telephone book dated 1940 lists it as the address of Alvin Maddox. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16163/
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]
A picture of the home at 1004 SW 10th Street, Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. The picture does not afford a sufficiently good view to determine its style, but Neoclassical elements are evident. A 1940 telephone book lists it as the address of one Alvin Maddox. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16164/
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. The style of the house has been tentatively identified as Italian Renaissance. This house was also home to the John Moore family, and to the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of house was taken April 4, 1976. This photograph is to be found on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16165/
[The Clark Residence on N W 4th Ave.]
The W. V. Clark residence on NW 4th Avenue (which was originally called Pecan Street). This photograph was taken in June of 1974. A photograph on page 139 of "TIME WAS..." by A. F. Weaver shows the house to better advantage before foliage of the trees obscured part of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16166/
[402 SW 5th Street]
A Victorian home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here at 402 SW 5th Street. Note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and wraparound porch. The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, suggesting that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16167/
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and was designed as an entertainment and social center. This house has also been home to the John Moore family and the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of the house was taken in June 1974. Another photograph of the house, without the obscuring of the trees in full leaf, may be seen in the preceding photograph;or on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16170/
[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]
This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. The style of the house is Queen Anne sub-type Free Classic. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16171/
[612 NW 6th Street]
This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16172/
[416 NW 6th Street]
This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1906 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. The house was purchased in 1917 by the attorney of Mrs. Wylie, Judge W.H. Gross. It was known as "The Gross House" until Mrs. Gross' death in 1952. The Luther Waddy family subsequently became owners. The next people to purchase the house were Mr. and Mrs. Jack Catrett in 2006. There are 10 rooms and 8 fireplaces (all coal-burning), each one unique, and believed to have been imported. There are many stained- and leaded-glass windows. This view is of the front, southern elevation of the house. The photograph was take in June of 1975. The style of the house is Queen Anne, sub-type Free Classic. The shaped parapet on the tower, and the parapets on the gables are taken from the sub-type Patterned Masonry. A rectangular tower (more readily visible in the next photograph)is very unusual in this type of architecture (round, square, or polygonal towers are more common). However, the shape may have been dictated by the use of cement blocks, which was a new material in this time Another view of the house may be found in "Time Was...", by A. F. Weaver, on page 141. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16173/
[The Una McLaughlin Home]
The "Una McLaughlin" home is located on NW 23rd Street. This photograph was taken in July, 1975. Built in 1927 by J.C. Cunningham, an oil operator. The home was sold in 1931 to Judge E.B. Ritchie. It was purchased in 1973 by Una McLaughlin. The tile in the living room fireplace is the same as used in the Baker Hotel. The tile, stained glass in the breakfast room, and the light fixtures are in the Art Deco style. The architectural style of the house is Italian Renaissance. It shows signs of remodeling. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16174/
[The Thompson (Later Cunningham) House, at 215 NE 2nd Street]
This is a February, 1974, photograph of the home at 215 NE 2nd Street, just north of the Baker Hotel. It was called the Thompson Home at that time, because it was occupied by Dr. A. W. Thompson as late as 1924. He built it in 1896 as a wedding present to his second wife. Dr. Thompson also owned a bath house and the Lamar Flats. Built in Queen Anne style, spindle work sub-type, the house was extensively restored in 2006 by Mr. Bill Pratt, Jr. This photograph appears in "Time Was..." on page 141. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16175/
[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]
This house, now [2009]located at 510 SW 4th Avenue at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and 5th Street, was a part of the original Mineral Wells College. The large structure was built in 1891 at 101 NW 5th Street. The front half of it was moved to its current location, and turned into a residence around 1902. The style is Queen Anne, but without a tower. Please note the two-story wraparound porch, which is rare in all parts of the nation, except for the south. This photograph may be found on page 170 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. [For more details about the College of Mineral Wells, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16176/
The Curtis House
The Curtis House was once to be found at 315 E. Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells. This photograph of it is to be found on page 101 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. Note the steeple of Methodist Episcopal Church at 301 NE 1st Street, at the far right edge of the picture. Built in 1898, the church was expanded in 1903 as the First Methodist church, whose congregation still [2008] occupies this location in a newer church building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16177/
Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building." It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. A vintage automobile is shown at right side of the picture. This building was demolished before 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16178/
Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas
The Carlisle House was owned and managed by Mrs. A[lexander] E[mmett] Carlisle, after the death of her husband in 1911. It was one of the largest hotels of its day, boasting sixty rooms. It was destroyed in a fire on July 4, 1914. The Abilene "Reporter" of July 5, 1914 reports that fire began its course at the Tourist Hotel (located, at the time, at 315 NW 4th street). It spread to the New Hazel Hotel (at 305 NW 4th Street), took in the Harrel House, (at 301 NW 4th street), the Lake Charles, Louisiana (511 NW 2nd Street), and the Burk House, 601 NW 3rd Avenue, as well as seven houses that were not hotels. The fire was so thorough that in 1921, the area was still devoid of buildings. It was on this site that Mordecai Ham (he who converted Billy Graham) put up a tent for a revival on March 23, 1927. He accepted the position of pastor at the First Baptist Church in Oklahoma City on June 19, 1927. He remained in that position until June 16, 1929, when he returned to the revival circuit. The Carlisle House was located in the same block as the the Mineral Wells Clinic, which in was known to be in existence in 1928. It later became the Nazareth Hospital (q.v.). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16179/
The Bimini Bath House
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building" is shown here. It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. It was later demolished. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16181/
St. Nicholas Hotel
A note with the picture states: The original picture was re-done and re-named the "Delaware Hotel." This picture appears on page 104 in "Time Was..." The building was located at 316 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. It was eventually destroyed by fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16182/
Exchange Hotel
[The] Exchange Hotel (also known as [The]Plateau in 1909, and later as the Hospital) was built on he site of the Cliff House, which was destroyed by fire. The house to the right was built in 1896 by Dr. A. W. Thompson as a wedding present for his second wife. The Mineral Wells Post Office was built on the vacant lot at the left of the hotel in 1912. The Mineral Wells City Directory of 1924 listed the former Exchange/Plateau building as the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. Dr. A.W. Thompson was still living in the house to the right at the time. The Hotel/Hospital was finally demolished. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16183/
Hotel Damron, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture shows a post-card view of the Damron Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. It was built in 1906 as The Colonial Hotel by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The hotel was traded around 1917 to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The hotel burned in 1978. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16184/
[A party at the Wann home]
A photograph of a news article describing a party given by Mrs. Chloe Schillings at her home, located on NW 2nd Street and 4th Avenue--across the street and west of the Presbyterian Church. The party included Mrs. M. R. Birdwell, Mrs. S. A. Prostridge, Mrs. B. R. Beeler, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. Elizabeth Cushman, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Mrs. Gus Wicklund, Mrs. Millie Turner, Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. Mae B. Tiliord, Mrs. E. W. Rogers, Mrs, Vera Lang, Mrs. Ed Oliver, Mrs. F. C. Highsmith and Mrs. Chloe Wann Schillings At the time of the news article, the home, a large Queen Anne-style house, was said to be owned by Mrs. S. H. Smith. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16185/
[Bathing Beauties]
Three young women lounge at the "old" Mineral Wells City Pool. The woman on the right was Jill Hickey, Mineral Wells High School graduate of 1966, later Jill Hickey Moore of Stafford, Texas. This photograph, judging by the women's hair-do's, appears to have been taken in the 1960's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16186/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
A view of the businesses and residences north of East State Highway 180, looking west toward the Baker Hotel in the background. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments and the Brazos Mall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16187/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-northeast was taken April 29, 1967, near the convergence of E. Hubbard and SE 1st Street(that together comprise US Highway 180-a one-way street through downtown Mineral Wells). Note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments at the upper left of the picture, and the Baker Hotel in the background at the extreme upper right corner of the picture. The buildings in the lower left corner of the picture are motels. The large vacant area in the picture was later developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16188/
[Three Women at a Swimming Pool]
Three women are shown at the "old" Mineral Wells City Pool. A male lifeguard, to their right, looks on unconcernedly. Only one woman can be identified: Jill Hickey, Mineral Wells High School graduate of 1966,the woman on the right, now Jill Hickey Moore of Stafford, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16189/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells, from the ENE, was taken April 29, 1967. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments building at the middle-left of the picture. It lies across the street behind the Brazos Mall (off the picture, left of Spanish Trail Apartments). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16190/