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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 County: Palo Pinto County, TX
[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!) east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California. Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons. Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Arch]  "Welcome Ye Editors"

[The Arch] "Welcome Ye Editors"

Date: 1908
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture of the arch, erected to welcome the members of the Texas Press Association (who held a meeting in the nearby Chautauqua auditorium--visible in the background), was taken from East Hubbard Street, looking North on Mesquite Street. The Texas Press Association held its meeting on May 21-23, 1908. A note with the photograph states "The group of people were attending the Odd Fellows Convention and/or Press Convention." The note also states that "Bill Cameron (Who was an editor of the Mineral Wells Newspaper. He was about 21 at this time) has an Odd Fellows Apron [sic] on." Aprons, however, are not in evidence in the picture. The men are shown assembled under the standard of a lodge (on the right-hand side, whose legend is barely legible), and they are wearing variously-decorated tippets (except, of course, for the man in the center, who is wearing a sash, and the men at the ends, three of whom wear sashes; and the others, who are wearing uniforms, bandoleers and plumed fore-and-aft hats). The organization has been tentatively identified as the Eagles, whose lodge was said to be organized in Mineral Wells in 1906.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Map of the City of Mineral Wells

A Map of the City of Mineral Wells

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A plat of the city of Mineral Wells, prior to 1920. The names of the streets were changed after 1920.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Gibson Well]

[The Gibson Well]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Gibson Well was located on the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. In 1888, the label on a bottle of "Natural Gibson Well Water" boasted cures for "constipation, rheumatism, female complaints, nervousness, calculi, stomach, liver, kidney & bladder disorders." Please note the crossing of the "WMW&NW RR" tracks and the "Dinky Car" tracks in the left foreground of the picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]

[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown in this picture are, from left to right: Maggie McDaniel, Annabel Cushman, Myra Hunt Oliver and (Valedictorian) Ferdinand "Doc" Howard. The title of his valedictory address was "The Electrical Age." The diplomas were presented by Judge F.C. Highsmith. This photograph is to be found in the second edition of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver on page 189.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]

[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]

[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Hexagon was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. The Convention Hall was built, in part, on the foundation of the Hexagon's DC power plant. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, which was held in 1925.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Baker Hotel:  A Picture Taken From the South Window of the Hexagon Hotel]

[The Baker Hotel: A Picture Taken From the South Window of the Hexagon Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A note with this photograph states: "Photo taken out of top floor south window of Hexagon Hotel. Photo re-printed in 1977. Photo probably taken 1954 due to penciled in date on back." (Also, the building in the lower left corner of the picture still bears the "USO" sign of World War II.) See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]. In front of the Baker Hotel stands the "Old" Post Office, now the Ladies Garden Club Building. The Crazy Hotel can be seen between the right edge of the picture and the spire attached atop one of the gables of the Hexagon Hotel.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]

[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the staircase in the Hexagon Hotel taken from the top floor. A view of the first-floor lobby can be seen at the lower middle of the picture with the stairs spiraling from floor to floor down to it. A writer in the Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.) in 1966 remarked that "[A]s one entered the lobby once could see the stairways as they encircled each floor giving a gallery effect." See also: "Hexagon Hotel [with history]" for further details.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]

[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Hexagon Hotel had four staircases that spiraled down through its five floors. The interior trim was of "heart of pine"--a hardwood, despite its name. Pegs and square nails were used in the construction. The building was designed in a honeycomb pattern to maximize ventilation for the comfort of the guests. See also: Hexagon Hotel [with history] for further details.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library