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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[915 NW 4th Avenue]

[915 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and was designed as an entertainment and social center. This house has also been home to the John Moore family and the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of the house was taken in June 1974. Another photograph of the house, without the obscuring of the trees in full leaf, may be seen in the preceding photograph;or on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]

[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. The style of the house is Queen Anne sub-type Free Classic. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[612 NW 6th Street]

[612 NW 6th Street]

Date: July 4, 1975
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[416 NW 6th Street]

[416 NW 6th Street]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1906 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. The house was purchased in 1917 by the attorney of Mrs. Wylie, Judge W.H. Gross. It was known as "The Gross House" until Mrs. Gross' death in 1952. The Luther Waddy family subsequently became owners. The next people to purchase the house were Mr. and Mrs. Jack Catrett in 2006. There are 10 rooms and 8 fireplaces (all coal-burning), each one unique, and believed to have been imported. There are many stained- and leaded-glass windows. This view is of the front, southern elevation of the house. The photograph was take in June of 1975. The style of the house is Queen Anne, sub-type Free Classic. The shaped parapet on the tower, and the parapets on the gables are taken from the sub-type Patterned Masonry. A rectangular tower (more readily visible in the next photograph)is very unusual in this type of architecture (round, square, or polygonal towers are more common). However, the shape may have been dictated by the use of cement blocks, which was a new material in this time Another view of the house may be found in "Time Was...", by ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Una McLaughlin Home]

[The Una McLaughlin Home]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The "Una McLaughlin" home is located on NW 23rd Street. This photograph was taken in July, 1975. Built in 1927 by J.C. Cunningham, an oil operator. The home was sold in 1931 to Judge E.B. Ritchie. It was purchased in 1973 by Una McLaughlin. The tile in the living room fireplace is the same as used in the Baker Hotel. The tile, stained glass in the breakfast room, and the light fixtures are in the Art Deco style. The architectural style of the house is Italian Renaissance. It shows signs of remodeling.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Thompson (Later Cunningham) House, at  215 NE 2nd Street]

[The Thompson (Later Cunningham) House, at 215 NE 2nd Street]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a February, 1974, photograph of the home at 215 NE 2nd Street, just north of the Baker Hotel. It was called the Thompson Home at that time, because it was occupied by Dr. A. W. Thompson as late as 1924. He built it in 1896 as a wedding present to his second wife. Dr. Thompson also owned a bath house and the Lamar Flats. Built in Queen Anne style, spindle work sub-type, the house was extensively restored in 2006 by Mr. Bill Pratt, Jr. This photograph appears in "Time Was..." on page 141.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]

[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This house, now [2009]located at 510 SW 4th Avenue at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and 5th Street, was a part of the original Mineral Wells College. The large structure was built in 1891 at 101 NW 5th Street. The front half of it was moved to its current location, and turned into a residence around 1902. The style is Queen Anne, but without a tower. Please note the two-story wraparound porch, which is rare in all parts of the nation, except for the south. This photograph may be found on page 170 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. [For more details about the College of Mineral Wells, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."]
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Curtis House

The Curtis House

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Curtis House was once to be found at 315 E. Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells. This photograph of it is to be found on page 101 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. Note the steeple of Methodist Episcopal Church at 301 NE 1st Street, at the far right edge of the picture. Built in 1898, the church was expanded in 1903 as the First Methodist church, whose congregation still [2008] occupies this location in a newer church building.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building." It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. A vintage automobile is shown at right side of the picture. This building was demolished before 2008.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Carlisle House was owned and managed by Mrs. A[lexander] E[mmett] Carlisle, after the death of her husband in 1911. It was one of the largest hotels of its day, boasting sixty rooms. It was destroyed in a fire on July 4, 1914. The Abilene "Reporter" of July 5, 1914 reports that fire began its course at the Tourist Hotel (located, at the time, at 315 NW 4th street). It spread to the New Hazel Hotel (at 305 NW 4th Street), took in the Harrel House, (at 301 NW 4th street), the Lake Charles, Louisiana (511 NW 2nd Street), and the Burk House, 601 NW 3rd Avenue, as well as seven houses that were not hotels. The fire was so thorough that in 1921, the area was still devoid of buildings. It was on this site that Mordecai Ham (he who converted Billy Graham) put up a tent for a revival on March 23, 1927. He accepted the position of pastor at the First Baptist Church in Oklahoma City on June 19, 1927. He remained in that position until June 16, 1929, when he returned to the revival circuit. The Carlisle House was located in the same block as the ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library