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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]

[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]

[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Hexagon was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. The Convention Hall was built, in part, on the foundation of the Hexagon's DC power plant. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, which was held in 1925.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Baker Hotel:  A Picture Taken From the South Window of the Hexagon Hotel]

[The Baker Hotel: A Picture Taken From the South Window of the Hexagon Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A note with this photograph states: "Photo taken out of top floor south window of Hexagon Hotel. Photo re-printed in 1977. Photo probably taken 1954 due to penciled in date on back." (Also, the building in the lower left corner of the picture still bears the "USO" sign of World War II.) See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]. In front of the Baker Hotel stands the "Old" Post Office, now the Ladies Garden Club Building. The Crazy Hotel can be seen between the right edge of the picture and the spire attached atop one of the gables of the Hexagon Hotel.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]

[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the staircase in the Hexagon Hotel taken from the top floor. A view of the first-floor lobby can be seen at the lower middle of the picture with the stairs spiraling from floor to floor down to it. A writer in the Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.) in 1966 remarked that "[A]s one entered the lobby once could see the stairways as they encircled each floor giving a gallery effect." See also: "Hexagon Hotel [with history]" for further details.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]

[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Hexagon Hotel had four staircases that spiraled down through its five floors. The interior trim was of "heart of pine"--a hardwood, despite its name. Pegs and square nails were used in the construction. The building was designed in a honeycomb pattern to maximize ventilation for the comfort of the guests. See also: Hexagon Hotel [with history] for further details.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Strange Structure [article]

Strange Structure [article]

Date: unknown
Creator: Neal, Maid J.
Description: An article written by Maid J. Neal, in an unknown publication, describes in detail the construction and design of the Hexagon Hotel, which was built in 1895-1897 by D. G. Galbraith. See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history] for further details.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel]

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Date: 1925
Creator: unknown
Description: A picture of the Hexagon Hotel. See also "Hexagon Hotel [with history]." This picture was taken in 1925. Note the construction of the Convention Hall beside the Hexagon Hotel on the right. The Convention Hall was demolished in 1977
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]

[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: Illustrated here is picture of a model of the Hexagon Hotel (and the only living daughter of David Galbraith, Elizabeth Sickels) that was taken about 1977. The model is now located in the Mineral Wells Historical Association's Rock School House.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel]

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The popular Hexagon Hotel, built in 1897, was the first structure in Mineral Wells to be electrically-lit. Electricity was supplied by a DC power plant next door. It was located at 701 N. Oak, and was torn down September 1959. This photograph is found on page 177 of "Time Was.." 2nd Ed. by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Hexagon Hotel [With History]

The Hexagon Hotel [With History]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Construction of the Hexagon Hotel was started in 1895 and completed in 1897. It was constructed of long-leaf yellow pine; the exterior was cypress siding, and the roof was covered with hand-split cypress shingles. The interior was of "Heart of Pine" wood. All the stone work was done by two English stone-masons. The building was constructed with pegs and square nails. The four staircases inside spiraled down through the five floors. The lobby floor was covered with hexagon-shaped tan, brown and blue tiles. The rooms were hexagon-shaped with a bath between every two rooms. The hotel was torn down for the materials in the building in September 1959. (This information is found on page 106 "Time Was in Mineral Wells" by A.F. Weaver) The "Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.)" remarks (in 1966) that "Rates in season were $1.50 per day; out of season, $1.00 per day, which included bath privileges. Meals were available at nearby hotels." The "Star" goes on to relate that the Hexagon Hotel was converted into apartments at some time prior to its utter demolition, but it does not say exactly when this conversion was made.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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