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[The Baker Hotel: A Picture Taken From the South Window of the Hexagon Hotel]
A note with this photograph states: "Photo taken out of top floor south window of Hexagon Hotel. Photo re-printed in 1977. Photo probably taken 1954 due to penciled in date on back." (Also, the building in the lower left corner of the picture still bears the "USO" sign of World War II.) See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]. In front of the Baker Hotel stands the "Old Post Office, now the Ladies Garden Club Building. The Crazy Hotel can be seen between the right edge of the picture and the spire attached atop one of the gables of the Hexagon Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20475/
[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]
This picture shows the staircase in the Hexagon Hotel taken from the top floor. A view of the first-floor lobby can be seen at the lower middle of the picture with the stairs spiraling from floor to floor down to it. A writer in the Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.) in 1966 remarked that "[A]s one entered the lobby once could see the stairways as they encircled each floor giving a gallery effect." See also: "Hexagon Hotel [with history]" for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20476/
[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]
The Hexagon Hotel had four staircases that spiraled down through its five floors. The interior trim was of "heart of pine"--a hardwood, despite its name. Pegs and square nails were used in the construction. The building was designed in a honeycomb pattern to maximize ventilation for the comfort of the guests. See also: Hexagon Hotel [with history] for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20477/
Strange Structure [article]
An article written by Maid J. Neal, in an unknown publication, describes in detail the construction and design of the Hexagon Hotel, which was built in 1895-1897 by D. G. Galbraith. See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20478/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A picture of the Hexagon Hotel. See also "Hexagon Hotel [with history]." This picture was taken in 1925. Note the construction of the Convention Hall beside the Hexagon Hotel on the right. The Convention Hall was demolished in 1977 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20479/
[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]
Illustrated here is picture of a model of the Hexagon Hotel (and the only living daughter of David Galbraith, Elizabeth Sickels) that was taken about 1977. The model is now located in the Mineral Wells Historical Association's Rock School House. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20480/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The popular Hexagon Hotel, built in 1897, was the first structure in Mineral Wells to be electrically-lit. Electricity was supplied by a DC power plant next door. It was located at 701 N. Oak, and was torn down September 1959. This photograph is found on page 177 of "Time Was.." 2nd Ed. by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20482/
The Hexagon Hotel [With History]
Construction of the Hexagon Hotel was started in 1895 and completed in 1897. It was constructed of long-leaf yellow pine; the exterior was cypress siding, and the roof was covered with hand-split cypress shingles. The interior was of "Heart of Pine" wood. All the stone work was done by two English stone-masons. The building was constructed with pegs and square nails. The four staircases inside spiraled down through the five floors. The lobby floor was covered with hexagon-shaped tan, brown and blue tiles. The rooms were hexagon-shaped with a bath between every two rooms. The hotel was torn down for the materials in the building in September 1959. (This information is found on page 106 "Time Was in Mineral Wells" by A.F. Weaver) The "Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.)" remarks (in 1966) that "Rates in season were $1.50 per day; out of season, $1.00 per day, which included bath privileges. Meals were available at nearby hotels." The "Star" goes on to relate that the Hexagon Hotel was converted into apartments at some time prior to its utter demolition, but it does not say exactly when this conversion was made. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20483/
Boating on Pinto Lake, Mineral Wells
This appears to be a photograph of an old postcard entitled "Boating on Pinto Lake, Mineral Wells." It shows a boating party taking a cruise by motor boat, which was an activity enjoyed by many tourists to this area. The picture appeared in the Daily Mineral Wells Index on May 6, 1902, but no date was assigned the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20484/
[West Ward School]
This photograph appears to have been given to A. W. Weaver with the following information on the back of it: "Wasn't it Whittier who said 'Still stately stands the old school house, beside the babbling brook'?--well this one no longer stands. It was a firm & strong old building when they tore it down 4 years ago. I thought you would cherish this picture as a fond recollection of yours, mine & Hugh's school days & days of happy childhood, where, as we romped & played barefoot in the soft sands & green grass, we were not as yet familiar with the hidden stones & thorns that one encounters down the highway of life. "All the sheet metal contained in the top of this building including the tin roof was made & fabricated by Papa in Grandpa's store. The metal work consists of the ornamental cornice fittings, the steeples at each corner of the building, metal banisters on the roof top, pinnacles around cupolas, flag pole with large metal ball on top & all drain piping and roof ventilators. "The barren oak trees in the yard are very familiar. Far to the right, not shown in the picture were several mesquite trees, whose limbs were platted & tied in knots when they were saplings, by Grandpa Caylor. The trees grew in the fantastic shapes. All school boys were mystified at the strange shape of the trees and Grandpa was amused." The school was located at 205 NW 5th Ave. It is both interesting and amazing how much of our history is not evident in the pictures that preserve such a vital part of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20214/
[A Brochure, Titled "Mineral Wells - A Town Built on Water"]
One side of a fold-out brochure produced by the Mineral Wells Chamber of Commerce, probably during the City's centennial year, 1981. On the reverse side is a statement: "Mineral Wells, a Texas Main Street City, looks back over a century of history rich with the tales of early day ranching and the discovery of mineral water and its medicinal qualities." Color photographs of the city and its scenic area landmarks are contained in the brochure, along with a listing of some annual local activities. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20216/
[An Early Panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas: 1882]
This photograph is an early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken approximately in 1882) from East Mountain, looking Southwest. Numbers on the photograph represent specific locations: 1. Judge Lynch's cabin, location of the first mineral water well; 2. N E 1st Avenue (second water well dug); 3. Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street; 4. Present location of the Fire and Police Station; 5. South Oak Avenue; 6. The Commercial Hotel (present location of the Gas Co.) 7. NE 1st Avenue business district; 8. North Oak Avenue. Note: The picture identifies number 6 as "The Commercial Hotel", but that hotel has been determined to have been located on South Oak Avenue. The hotel shown in the picture was the Early-Southern Hotel, which an 1893 guidebook clearly states was on Hubbard Street. The guidebook goes on to give the hotel's further location as "[O]n the same block with the post-office [sic]and three blocks from the depot." A Mr. Early is named as the proprietor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20218/
[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]
A very early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken around 1882) from East Mountain and looking southwest is illustrated here. Locations identified by numbers are: 1: Judge Lynch's cabin, now Lynch Plaza at S. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Street; 2: The Mesquite Street well, middle of NE 1st Avenue (the second well in town, now [2008] abandoned); 3:The current center of downtown Mineral Wells, showing the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180); 4: The current Fire and Police Departments; 5: S. Oak Avenue; 6: The Southern House Hotel; 7: The present "Business District", NE 1st Avenue; and 8: N. Oak Avenue (a residential area at the time.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20219/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 1 of 21, Dec. 22, 1975]
A fire destroyed the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975. The hotel was located at 109 West Hubbard Street, facing north, before the unfortunate conflagration. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, located in the same block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20222/
[The Baker Hotel Entrance]
Shown here is the main entrance to the Baker Hotel, which went directly into the hotel lobby. Note individuals on the veranda that are standing as well as sitting in deck chairs. Cars are parked on East Hubbard St. (US Hwy 180). Some of the most famous (and some of the infamous) people have entered through this arcade. For example, Sam Goldwyn, Jean Harlow, Clark Gable, Sammy Kaye, Helen Keller, Clyde Barrow, Lyndon Johnson, Dr. Charles Mayo, Sam Rayburn, Tom Mix, Sophie Tucker, the Three Stooges, and Roy Rogers were all guests at the hotel at one time or another. This photograph was donated by Mrs. Guy Montgomery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20223/
The Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells
A.F. Weaver obtained this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters", now in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.). The booklet is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and is not meant to be taken seriously. See also the cartoons "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20224/
Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells
This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20225/
The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877
This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20226/
[The First Air-Mail Service to Mineral Wells]
The first batch of airmail arrived in Mineral Wells, 1947, 6:30 pm. Individuals from left are: John Chamberlain, Manager of the Chamber of Commerce, Fred Parnell, Bill Cameron, of the Index, Fred Brown, Manager of the Baker Hotel, Mayor John Miller, an unidentified pilot, D.C. Harris, Postmaster (holding the mail bag) and R. T. Jones. The airplane in the background, a Cessna 190, was probably the one used to transport the mail. It appeared to be a cold day, as the officials are all wearing coats. (A negative accompanying this picture depicted a "Christmas rush at the old Post Office") texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20227/
Piedmont Hotel - [The Second Piedmont Hotel]
This photograph occurs on page 104 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells" (first edition) by A. F. Weaver. The caption reads: "The Second Piedmont Hotel located on 2nd Avenue [sic] and East Hubbard was demolished to give room for the Baker Hotel Garage. It was used as an office for the Army Engineers during the construction of Possum Kingdom Dam." This hotel was probably located on the same site as the first Piedmont Hotel, which was built by a Colonel Duke of Weatherford, Texas, (a two story wooden structure) a picture of which is also on page 104 of the same edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20228/
Ex- Confederates, Mineral Wells Camp No. 772
No information is available about this photograph, other than inscription "Ex. Confederates Min. Wells Camp no. 772" written in white or silver ink. There are twenty-three men in the picture (16 standing, 7 kneeling) apparently taken on NE 1st Street, beside the rock-constructed Yeager Drug Store. The apparent ages of the men indicates they were probably surviving veterans of the Civil War, either living in Mineral Wells or attending a convention here. The photograph is mounted on cardboard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20229/
[The Murphy Family]
A scene of children sitting in horse-drawn carriage, with a man leaning against the carriage house is illustrated here. A family home is shown in the background, with chickens, and a cow in the foreground. Information on back of photograph states "Looking west. Back of Murphy Home on East Mountain." Murphy was a builder in Mineral Wells with the firm of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors. They built many of the buildings in the early part of the 1900's, including Mineral Wells High School (1915), Bimini Bath House, and the Norwood Hospital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20230/
[The Suspension Bridge Over the Brazos River (3)]
A suspension bridge is shown, being built over the Brazos river near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto county. Three adults and a child in early twentieth-century clothes are obscurely visible in the lower left-center. The view is looking east. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20231/
[The Suspension Bridge over Brazos River (2)]
A view of suspension bridge being built over the Brazos river near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto county. The view is looking west. An inscription on the mounting of the photograph reads: "A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20232/
[The Suspension Bridge Over the Brazos River (1)]
Shown here is a view of suspension bridge being built over the Brazos River near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto County. Printed in the corner of the mount is "A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20233/
The Bimini
The Bimini Mineral Baths, at 112 NW 4th Street, was built by Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, contractors in the early 1900's. The Bimini later became the Wagley Bathhouse. Dr. Wagley was an early pharmacist in Mineral Wells. Please note the utter lack of automobiles, and the horse-drawn vehicle in front of the bath house. The meaning of the white-ink number "1861" remains to be determined. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20234/
[The Norwood Hospital]
A photograph of the Norwood Hospital during its completion. Note the "Parry and Spicer Architects" sign and the "Goodrum, Murphy and Croft Contractors" sign. Dr. Norwood was the first Osteopathic doctor to set up business in Mineral Wells. He departed this life at the age of 82 in 1953. The building was donated to the Mineral Wells Historic Foundation. Plans were announced to convert the clinic to a Bed and Breakfast facility, but no progress towards such a conversion has been made to date [2007]. The legend "1863" appears on the photograph, but it is not known what it signifies. It cannot possibly be the date of the building--or of its photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20235/
[The D. M. Howard Store]
A photograph taken during the construction of the D. M. Howard Store, located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. D. M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive in Mineral Wells. He built the first large department store(s) here. This was the first in a complex of Howard Brothers stores, and later housed the J. M. Belcher Furniture Store and its successor, R. & W. Furniture. Howard himself departed this life in 1910. The building was torn down in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20236/
[The Ground-breaking for Mineral Wells High School, 1914]
The ground-breaking ceremony for Mineral Wells High School in 1914 is shown here. The school, finished in 1915, was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and NW 5th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20237/
[Mineral Wells High School]
This photograph was taken at the completion of Mineral Wells High School in 1915. The Mineral Wells Independent School District donated the building to the Fifty Year Club in 2007. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20238/
[An Early Couple]
This picture is probably a photographic portrait of Col. and Mrs. W.R. Austin, mentioned on page 54 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." second edition. He established the Austin Well where "Blind Nellie" was employed. See also, [Col. and Mrs. W. Riess Austin] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20239/
[The Founder of Mineral Wells - Portrait]
This unlabeled photograph appears to be of Judge J. A. Lynch and his third wife, Armanda Sweeny Lynch, possibly at a family reunion. Judge James Alvis Lynch was the founder of Mineral Wells. No identification of the people (numbered) around them appears to survive. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20240/
Judge J. A. Lynch
Shown here is a reproduction of a steel engraving of Judge J. A. Lynch, founder of Mineral Wells. The source of the engraving remains unknown. A fragment of copy at the bottom of the picture mentions the "inconvenience of hauling it from the Brazos River." The initials "GSW" are visible to the left of the judge's lapel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20241/
[The East Ward School]
This photograph, taken around 1909, shows the East Ward School. Built in 1906, and located at 400 NE 9th Avenue, this served as Mineral Wells' first High School as well as an elementary school. It was closed in 1930, and Murphy and Murphy Concrete is now at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20242/
The John Moore Home, 1911, 2 of 2: Interior
An inscription on photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The original builder was Hugh Coleman. John Moore occupied the house at a later date. Please note the period dress and furniture. The names of the people pictured are not known. This photograph appears to show a house now located at 915 NW 4th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20243/
John Moore Home, 1911 [exterior]
An inscription on photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The house was built in 1906 at 915 NW 4th Avenue by Hugh Coleman. Note the period dress and cowboy clothing. The names of the people pictured are not known. The young man in the foreground is demonstrating his skill with a lariat. The group appears to be in the home's porte-cochere, which was used to protect people, while disembarking from an automobile or a carriage during inclement weather texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20244/
The John Moore Home, 1911, 1 of 2: Interior
An inscription on the photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The original builder of the house was Hugh Coleman. John Moore occupied the house in the early twentieth century. Please note the period dress and furniture. The fireplace shows an "Arts and Crafts" style of construction. The names of the people pictured are not known. This picture appears to be that of a house now [2008]located at 915 NW 4th Avenue. Hugh M. Coleman was the head of H.M. Coleman & Co., dealers in "Everything that men wear." He is said to have accumulated a large number of rent houses, of which this might be one. (This information about Hugh Coleman is taken from the "Mineral Wells Index", special supplement, originally published May 6, 1907) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20245/
[The West Ward School]
The West Ward School is shown with "Dinky Car" tracks in foreground. The picture was taken around 1909. The first Mineral Wells School with a graduating class, built in 1902, it was located just north of Little Rock School on NW 5th Avenue. Mineral Wells' first High School graduation class, consisted of four students in 1903, as evinced by a photograph in "Time Was...", page 189. It was later named "Houston School" in 1915. The West Ward School was subsequently torn down. Another school, constructed on SW 4th Avenue, was then named "Houston School." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20246/
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20247/
[The Murphy Home]
A picture taken of the Murphy home about, taken the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The home underwent several renovations during Mr. Murphy's residency. The family at the time of this photograph consisted of two adults and three children. The home is located on East Mountain, and can be seen from most of North Oak Avenue. It was later known as the Brewer home. Mr. Murphy, a contractor, built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School and the second First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20248/
[The Brewer Home]
The Brewer home on East Mountain is shown here, from a picture taken April 4, 1976. It is visible from most of North Oak Avenue. Originally the Murphy Home, the building underwent many renovations during the period of Mr. Murphy's residence. Mr. Murphy was a contractor who built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School (1914) and the third First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20249/
[A Bottle-shaped Souvenir Booklet]
Two pages of a souvenir booklet touting the benefits of Mineral Wells, Texas are illustrated here. The shape suggests a bottle of mineral water. Dr. Dan Cupid has abandoned his bow and arrow in favor of mineral water to treat heart conditions. Among his stock of waters prescribed are bottles from the Crazy, Carlsbad, Gibson, and Lamar Wells. There are other pages of this booklet elsewhere in this collection. They could perhaps be placed together in a file at some time in the future. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20250/
[The First Mayor of Incorporated Mineral Wells]
Judge J. A. Lynch bought eighty acres, laid out the city of Mineral Wells, and was its first self-appointed Mayor. The city itself incorporated in 1882, and Jim Laverty became the first Mayor of the newly-incorporated Mineral Wells. Mineral Wells adopted a change of charter in 1894; and a new corporation was formed, which elected G. C. Green the first Mayor of this new corporation. This picture shows Jim Laverty and his dog in 1882. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20251/
[Games at Elmhurst Park]
A girls' basketball game is being played at Elmhurst Park, around 1910. Ladies in the picture are wearing ladies' basketball uniforms of the day. Ladies at the time played on a half-court, and the game was strictly a no-contact sport. The game was re-started with a jump ball after each score, tie-ball, or infraction of the rules. There were six players on each "side", three "offense", and three defenders. This picture may be found on page 89 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", Second Edition, by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20252/
A July Crowd
This photograph,labeled "A July Crowd", shows a ladies' gathering about 1920. The photograph shows what is possibly a tea party or a ladies' club meeting. Some of the ladies shown were members of prominent Mineral Wells families. Identified in a typed note - and graph - accompanying the photograph are: (starting at back left) the 4th lady is Mrs. D. G. Galbraith [wife of the owner of the Hexagon House], the 8th is Mrs. E. F. Yeager [wife of Dr. E.F. Yeager, Pharmacist/ Owner of the Lion Drug Store), 16th is Mrs. J.H. McCracken [wife Dr. J.H. McCracken, president of the Texas Medical Association], 17th may be Mrs. Raines (Mrs. McCracken's mother); (middle row, starting in front of Mrs. Yeager) the second from left is Mrs. Dr. Beeler; (first row from left) the 3rd lady may be Mrs. Coon, the 6th lady is Mrs. Paul Bock, the 8th is Mrs. Reba Williams. The children in front are Langdon Bock on the left and Elizabeth Galbraith on the right. There were forty people in total. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20253/
[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]
The Lion's Club presented an annual comedy skit known as a "Womanless Wedding." This one took place about 1940, and appears on page 119 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," First edition, 1974, by A. F. Weaver. He identifies the men as, "Standing in back: G. Ritchie, Weaver, B. Joiner, B. Holmes, ?, N. Glenn, J. McGaha. Middle row: F. Brewer, ?, H. Cohen, ?. Front row seated: G. Johnson, ?, L. Gambrell, ?, C. Lodal, N. Carlock, ?, M. Mullins." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20254/
[Judy Garland in Mineral Wells]
This picture, found on page 161 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, identifies the man selling a money order to Judy Garland in the Old Post Office (on NE 2nd Street) as D. C. Harris. The man on the right is identified as W. A. Ross. It has since [2102] been determined that the reason for Miss Garland's presence in the post Office was to lead a procession of children there in order to purchase Defense Stamps. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20255/
[A View from West Mountain, about 1912]
This photograph was taken after the Chautauqua was demolished (that is, about 1912). The foundation can be seen in the upper right quadrant. The Post Office, completed in 1913, is visible to the right of the Chautauqua ruins. The old viewing tower on the top of the hill, destroyed by a tornado in 1930, is just barely visible in the trees on top of the hill. The first Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats drinking pavilion, which burned in 1925, are seen one block northwest of the Post Office. The Murphy home is on top of the hill in the middle of the photograph. The Hexagon Hotel (torn down in 1959) is just above and left of the center. The Vichy Well is just to the right of the Hexagon House, and is now the location of the North Oak Community Center. In the the next block north (left) of the Hexagon House, facing west, is the Fairfield Inn with a ground-level entrance on each floor. Note the city's water tower at left center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20256/
[Col. and Mrs. W. Riess (W. R.) Austin]
Colonel and Mrs. W. Riess (W. R.) Austin are depicted here, from an image taken from a 1902 photograph. Colonel Austin is mentioned on page 54 of "Time Was..." second edition. A. F. Weaver says, "...the Austin Well, established by Col. W. R. Austin, who came from Kentucky to Palo Pinto County about 1880. Austin settled on Staggs Prairie, where he farmed and ranched. Then he became interested in mineral waters when he had an eye infection that affected his sight. So he moved to Mineral Wells, and the constant use of the waters restored his sight. He engaged in the dairy business, at first; but later entered the mineral water production field, establishing the Austin Well, which was later operated by his son-in-law, Tom Sims." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20257/
[The Rock School Bell]
The "Little Rock School" was Mineral Wells' first public school, built in 1884. The school bell, mounted in a bell tower atop the building, called students to class by ringing 10 minutes before school time; and again at the beginning of the class period. It is now currently on display at the Little Rock School Museum, dedicated to preserving the history of Mineral Wells. This picture is found on page 172 of A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, with a notation: "The original bell for the old 'Rock School' was found years later in the water department warehouse. R. L. (Pete) Cook is on the left and Derrell Stricklin is on the right." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20258/