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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the previous photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Colonel Boykin Home - 1301 SE 4th Avenue]

[The Colonel Boykin Home - 1301 SE 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: The Colonel Boykin Home, at 1301 SE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas appears to show neo-classical elements, along with evidence of later remodeling. This home was built in 1905 by Colonel Walter H. Boykin, owner of the Fairfield Inn. It was later purchased by William Whipple Johnson who, with his brother, Harvey, originally developed the coal mines in Thurber, Texas. Johnson opened the Rock Creek Mine in far western Parker County (after selling the mines at Thurber) and lived in this home while he operated it. The Will Smith family owned the house during the 1930's The house was converted to a rooming house during World War II, and abandoned in later years. The abandoned house was bought in 1975 by Morris Wayne Garrett and his wife, Darlene. They salvaged artifacts from several historical buildings in Mineral Wells that were in the process of being demolished: A beveled-glass door from the old Miller Hotel, large claw-footed bathtubs from the Jerome Hotel, French doors and tall windows from the old Firemen's club at Lake Mineral Wells, and baluster rails which were once part of the Hexagon Hotel, in their efforts to restore the home to its former grandeur.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Penix Home ]

[The Penix Home ]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Penix House ]

[The Penix House ]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) was once owned by William H. Penix, who was a partner in the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He was also vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style of the house is Queen Anne, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual flat-topped tower on the left of the photograph. Such towers were almost always turreted, flat-tops being practically unknown in this style of architecture. It might not be original; but given the general appearance of the house the condition of the tower might be a testimony to the ravages of time.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]

[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]

Date: June 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph affords a wider view of the house shown in the previous picture. It is of eclectic style, with Prairie, and Neoclassical elements. A telephone book dated 1940 lists it as the address of Alvin Maddox.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]

[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A picture of the home at 1004 SW 10th Street, Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. The picture does not afford a sufficiently good view to determine its style, but Neoclassical elements are evident. A 1940 telephone book lists it as the address of one Alvin Maddox.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[915 NW 4th Avenue]

[915 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: April 4, 1976
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. The style of the house has been tentatively identified as Italian Renaissance. This house was also home to the John Moore family, and to the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of house was taken April 4, 1976. This photograph is to be found on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Clark Residence on N W 4th Ave.]

[The Clark Residence on N W 4th Ave.]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The W. V. Clark residence on NW 4th Avenue (which was originally called Pecan Street). This photograph was taken in June of 1974. A photograph on page 139 of "TIME WAS..." by A. F. Weaver shows the house to better advantage before foliage of the trees obscured part of it.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[402 SW 5th Street]

[402 SW 5th Street]

Date: June 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: A Victorian home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here at 402 SW 5th Street. Note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and wraparound porch. The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, suggesting that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library