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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A float, with women dressed in period clothing, appeared in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (commemorating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates several historical mineral-water drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, including the Lithia, the Gibson, Lynch's mineral well, the Carlsbad, the Crazy, and the Hawthorne.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]

[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]

Date: July 1975
Creator: unknown
Description: Trees in full foliage (in July of 1975) obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2009] owned by David Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Old Matt Skeen Home - 516 NE 4th Avenue]

[The Old Matt Skeen Home - 516 NE 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a picture of old Matt Skeen Home at 516 NE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The porch, the face of the gable, and the differing roof lines all suggest later remodeling. Note the unusual candle-snuffer roof of the unusually-placed tower. The picture was taken June of 1974.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Ray Hamilton Home - 1016 SW 7th Avenue]

[The Ray Hamilton Home - 1016 SW 7th Avenue]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Ray Hamilton Home at 1016 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The style is Queen Anne, free classic. Please note the inset arches and the Palladian windows. The style was popular around the turn of the twentieth century. The house shows very slight evidence of remodeling.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Old Katie Ware Home,  911 North. Oak]

[The Old Katie Ware Home, 911 North. Oak]

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: The old Katie Ware Home is also shown here. The style appears to be Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-style but it shows signs of extensive remodeling. Note the slightly unusual polygonal tower, and the front porch (which also serves as a car-port)that is level with the ground. It was located at 911 N. Oak Street. The photograph was taken taken during June of 1974.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue

[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: The old Katie Ware Home, of Queen Anne Style, shows possible remodeling. Please note the slightly unusual octagonal tower. Also note the front porch, level with the ground. The building was located at 911 N. Oak Avenue. It has since [2008] been demolished. The picture was taken on taken June of 1974. The picture shows the home from the front.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the previous photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Colonel Boykin Home - 1301 SE 4th Avenue]

[The Colonel Boykin Home - 1301 SE 4th Avenue]

Date: June 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: The Colonel Boykin Home, at 1301 SE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas appears to show neo-classical elements, along with evidence of later remodeling. This home was built in 1905 by Colonel Walter H. Boykin, owner of the Fairfield Inn. It was later purchased by William Whipple Johnson who, with his brother, Harvey, originally developed the coal mines in Thurber, Texas. Johnson opened the Rock Creek Mine in far western Parker County (after selling the mines at Thurber) and lived in this home while he operated it. The Will Smith family owned the house during the 1930's The house was converted to a rooming house during World War II, and abandoned in later years. The abandoned house was bought in 1975 by Morris Wayne Garrett and his wife, Darlene. They salvaged artifacts from several historical buildings in Mineral Wells that were in the process of being demolished: A beveled-glass door from the old Miller Hotel, large claw-footed bathtubs from the Jerome Hotel, French doors and tall windows from the old Firemen's club at Lake Mineral Wells, and baluster rails which were once part of the Hexagon Hotel, in their efforts to restore the home to its former grandeur.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Penix Home ]

[The Penix Home ]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library