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[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, looking northwest. Identified buildings include the Baker Hotel (center), the Hexagon Hotel (right, north of Baker), the Convention Hall (next to and right of the Hexagon), the Box Factory (formerly the Crazy Water Crystal plant, left and west of the Hexagon Hotel), the First Methodist Church (across street right and northeast of Baker), the Baker Parking Garage (across the street, south of and immediately in front of the Hotel in this picture), and the Baker Water Works (extreme right middle, up the slope of East Mountain.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16222/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
A panoramic view of Mineral Wells looking southwest from East Mountain, Poston's Dry Goods store may be seen in the middle left of the picture, and the Old High School, Rock Schoolhouse, and West Ward School are visible next to West Mountain skyline in the upper right corner of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20305/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
Illustrated here is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east looking west. The Parkwood apartments and the brick factory are in the background. The Sands Motel is in the bottom part of the picture, and East Hubbard Street (Highway US 180) is in the far lower left corner of the picture. The large vacant area was later developed, with Lakewell House Retirement Home built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16199/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-southeast looking northwest. The Baker Hotel is the dominant building in the middle left of the picture. The Crazy Hotel is seen two blocks north (right) and one block west of the Baker. Immediately in front of the Baker is the hotel swimming pool (the second hotel to have its own pool). To the right (north) of the pool is the First Methodist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16203/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]
A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16250/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (2 of 2)]
This aerial photograph is adjacent to, and south of, the previous photograph. It is taken from South Mountain, looking east-south-east. The Chautauqua is on the upper left of the picture. The Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (which burned March 15, 1925) is below and to the right of the Chautauqua. The area in foreground is a residential area of west Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16249/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells was taken April 29, 1967 from the East looking slightly West. Please note the Spanish Trace Apartments and the back of Brazos Mall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16194/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East 1967]
This photograph is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-northeast. It was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace apartments across the street from it at the upper left edge of the picture. The large building at the lower left corner of the picture is the Sands motel. The large vacant area was later developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16191/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
This photograph illustrates an aerial view of Mineral Wells, taken April 29, 1967, from the ENE looking slightly toward the WSW. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16193/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells, from the ENE, was taken April 29, 1967. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments building at the middle-left of the picture. It lies across the street behind the Brazos Mall (off the picture, left of Spanish Trail Apartments). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16190/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial View of Mineral Wells looking SW was taken on April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and the Spanish Trace Apartments. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16192/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-northeast was taken April 29, 1967, near the convergence of E. Hubbard and SE 1st Street(that together comprise US Highway 180-a one-way street through downtown Mineral Wells). Note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments at the upper left of the picture, and the Baker Hotel in the background at the extreme upper right corner of the picture. The buildings in the lower left corner of the picture are motels. The large vacant area in the picture was later developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16188/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells, from ENE looking WSW, was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments building across the street from it in the upper middle of the picture. ANTENNA PRODUCTS is at the left edge of the picture. CANTEX (PVC products) is above and left of the Brazos Mall. The Mesa Motel and Sands Motel are at the lower left corner. The large Vacant area was latter developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it, texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16195/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Northwest, 1967]
This photograph illustrates an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the northwest. Note the Baker Hotel in the middle of the top half of the picture. The Crazy Water Hotel is below the Baker (two blocks in front). The Box Factory is the white many-storied building a few blocks below The Crazy and near the center of the picture. The Nazareth Hospital is a block to the right of The Crazy. The Mineral Wells Box Factory (Formerly the Crazy Water Crystals plant) is about two blocks this side (below) the Crazy Hotel and Convention Hall is a block to its left. The photograph was taken April 29, 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16201/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the South-Southeast, 1967]
This photograph shows an aerial view that was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Baker Hotel in the middle of the upper half of the picture, The Crazy Hotel is two blocks right (north and west) of The Baker. East Mountain is to the right of The Baker and "The Cove" (housing area)lies between it and Bald Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16197/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Southeast, 1967]
An aerial photograph that was taken April 29, 1967 of Mineral Wells looks northwest. Notable landmarks are the Baker Hotel (in the middle of the picture), United First Methodist Church (a block east and to the right of the Baker), the Crazy Water Hotel (above the church), the Box Factory two-three blocks right of The Crazy, the Old High School (the three-story structure about six blocks left (west) of the Baker at the edge of the populated area), and the Old Rock School House (right and adjacent to) the Old High School. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16202/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Southwest]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells from the southwest is shown here. It starts about SW 4th Avenue. The photograph was taken before 1967, the year the present First Baptist Church, which is not visible on lower left of the photograph, was completed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16200/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells, Texas]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken by A. F. Weaver on April 29, 1967 looks North on Oak Avenue. Identifiable in the picture are the Baker Hotel to the middle right of the picture, The Crazy Hotel in the middle left, the old Post Office (now the Ladies Club) one block north of The Baker, and the Nazareth Hospital (one block left of The Crazy Hotel). Also in the picture are now-destroyed buildings: The Damron Hotel (just left of center), the Baker Water Storage Building (mid-upper right, small white building just to right of Baker Hotel), the Oxford Hotel (just right of center, now [2008] Lynch Plaza) and the Convention Hall(upper left). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20212/
[An Aerial View of Northwest Mineral Wells]
An aerial view of northwest Mineral Wells that was taken between 1959 and 1969 is shown here. The Hexagon Hotel on North Oak Street can be seen in the center left foreground with the Convention Center immediately north (to the right)of it, and the Crazy Water Crystal plant two blocks northwest. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16234/
[An Aerial View of Residential Areas]
An aerial view of residential area in Mineral Wells is shown here. The exact locale of the photograph is unclear. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16196/
[Art Weaver 's Studio]
This picture shows the 400 block of North Oak Avenue as it was in 1975. Art Weaver Photography (412 North Oak Avenue) is shown, adjacent to and right of the Grand theater (formerly the Crazy Theater). (This picture collection is part of the lifetime collection of pictures of Art Weaver.) The Baker Hotel is in the background on the skyline at the far right of the picture. NOTE: The camera angle and its lens make this picture appear to be a street corner. However, North Oak Avenue is actually a straight street, running North-South. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20436/
[The Crazy Hotel, East Side]
This photograph was taken in front of the Weaver Photography Studio (412 North Oak)in 1974, and looking west across Oak Street to the Crazy Hotel. The east-side entrance to hotel is clearly visible. The picture was taken before the widening of US Highway 281 through town in year 2005. The automobile at the curb was Mr. Weaver's. The entrance to Crazy drinking water pavilion is on the far right of picture, through a hooded door, under a tile-covered shed roof. It is visible above the hood of the automobile in the foreground. The lobby entrance is beyond the pickup truck, under the "Crazy Hotel" sign. Steps that lead to Mr. Weaver's photography studio are on the front left of the picture. The curved effect of the picture comes from the wide-angle, short focal-length lens that Mr. Weaver used to obtain the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20420/
"Crazy Hotel Opens"
CRAZY HOTEL OPENS: A program Presented by A.F. Weaver to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association March 10, 1994. [This is the first of ten pages, stapled at upper left-hand corner.] The text was probably computer-generated in 13-point sans-serif script and it is likely that Mr. Weaver began his program with a contemporary newspaper account of the gala opening of the re-built hotel. Certainly the opening of the significant hotel was a red-letter day in the history of Mineral Wells. A photocopy of a souvenir menu was laminated on the back of Mr. Weaver's prepared program.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38087/
[The Crazy Water Well--1974]
The original Crazy Woman's Well is preserved under the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Crazy Hotel. This is the well the mentally-challenged (or the once-designated "Crazy woman") drank from that "cured" her dementia. Although not used for years, the well probably only requires a pump to resume production. Printed on the back of this picture is "The Crazy Well as today", and stamped "Mar. 21, 1974." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29970/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall--1 of 5: Front View]
The metal framework of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall is all that it readily visible during its demolition in 1975/1976. Built on the rock foundation of the Hexagon House Electric Plant (for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention in 1925), it served as the site of numerous local functions including High School Graduation Exercises. The landmark Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the left foreground of this picture from 1897 to 1959. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29412/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 2 of 5: From a Block Away]
This photograph was taken at an early stage of the demolition of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall on N. Oak Avenue. Built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, it was constructed on the rock foundation of the Hexagon Hotel's electric power plant. The Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the foreground of this picture. It was torn down in 1959. When the Convention Hall was torn down in 1975, a member of the demolition crew said the new owner of the former London Bridge (to be re-erected at Havasu City in Arizona)was interested in acquiring the rocks to build the foundation for a fort to be constructed at the same site. (One local story credits that interest in the foundation stones as the reason for the demolition of the Convention Hall.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29413/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 1 of 11: Wood Pile and Building]
The third building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; it was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished for the current building. The First Baptist church was originally located in a frame building on the southwest corner of the Crazy block in 1883. A second church was built at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and West Hubbard Street, facing SW 4th Avenue. It was a frame building with two steeples. A brick church, facing Hubbard Street, was erected to accommodate the congregation in 1920. These photographs illustrate the demolition of this building. The present church was erected in 1967 at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and SW 1st Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29915/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 2 of 11: Another Angle]
The first house of worship of the congregation of First Baptist Church, located in the southwest corner of the Crazy Well block, was purchased in 1883 and was used until 1900. The First Baptist Church was re-located to the corner of W. Hubbard and Pecan Street (now SE 4th Avenue) in 1900, and used until 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29914/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 3 of 11: East View]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, when it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see Number 1 of this collection for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29913/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 4 of 11: The Beginning]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church building was built in the same location. Please see Number 1 in this series for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29912/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 5 of 11: Looking Northeast.]
The church building, shown here as being demolished, was built in 1920; and was replaced in 1967 by the present church building. It is the third Baptist church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29911/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 6 0f 11: Frame ]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; and used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29910/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 7 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The First Baptist Church's second building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third, and current, church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29909/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 8 of 11: Frame of Building]
The second building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was then demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29908/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 10 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29906/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 11 of 11: Partially Demolished]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29905/
[The East Side of the (Third) First Presbyterian Church Building]
This picture shows the back (east) side of the third First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. It features an arched window, and (presumably) the dedicatory cornerstone. Due to structural damage, this building was torn down in the 1980's, and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church - the third building at 300 NW 4th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25008/
[First Christian Church]
Typed on the back photograph is: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY A.F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVE. MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS DATE JUL 27, 1964. It is a view of the limestone church occupying the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion. Some of the rock used in this church came from owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29977/
[First Christian Church]
On the back of photograph is typed: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY, A. F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVENUE MINERAL WELLS TEXAS DATE JUL 27 1964. First Christian church occupies the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue (the address on the photograph was A.F. Weaver's home.) Some of the limestone used to build the church was donated by latter-day owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie, where the first meeting of the Northwest Texas Cattle Raisers' Association was held in 1876. Oliver Loving's son, J.C. Loving, wrote a letter to northwest Texas ranchers after the meeting, inviting them to meet the following February in Graham, where the Association was organized. C.C. Slaughter, once the richest man in Texas, owned the Rock Pens at the time of the Stock Raisers' meeting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29978/
[First Presbyterian Church - 1 of 13: Front View]
This photograph is the first in a series of pictures of architectural details that was taken prior to demolition of the Presbyterian church of Mineral Wells. The first church in Mineral Wells built by the Presbyterians in 1883 was located at the southwest corner of what is now the Crazy Hotel block. The early church served both the Presbyterian and Baptist Churches, and was sold to the Baptist congregation. The First Presbyterian Church was built at 300 NW 4th Avenue in 1896, and burned in 1908 This domed structure replaced it. This picture shows the front entrance to the Sanctuary of this second First Presbyterian Church in Mineral Wells, Texas, built in 1909, at this location. This picturesque building survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed the two-by-three city block area surrounding it. The building suffered serious structural deterioration to its foundation, and was replaced in the the 1980's by a more modern structure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25022/
[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]
This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25015/
[First Presbyterian Church - 3 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fourth in a series of pictures, showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows the dome over the Sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25032/
[First Presbyterian Church - 4 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fifth in a series of pictures of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. This picture shows the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church and the dome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25035/
[First Presbyterian Church --5 of 13: Front Entrance]
Shown here is the sixth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows a close-up of the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25034/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 6 of 13: Dome Detail]
This picture is the seventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. It shows the dome atop the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25021/
[First Presbyterian Church -7 of 13: Dome Detail]
The eighth in a series of pictures of architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this picture is a close-up of the dome atop the sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25024/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 8 of 13: Gable Over the Entrance]
The ninth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this view is a close-up of the pediment over the front entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25039/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 9 of 13: South Side]
This photograph is the tenth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church. This picture is a view of the south side of the church, including, at left, the main entrance at southwest corner of building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25012/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 10 of 13: Close Up of Dome]
This is the eleventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church, being a close-up of the unique dome that topped the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25005/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 11 of 13: Close Up of the Dome]
This picture is the twelfth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of The First Presbyterian Church. This picture details the dome atop the church in a close-up view. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25023/