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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 6 0f 11: Frame ]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; and used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29910/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 7 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The First Baptist Church's second building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third, and current, church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29909/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 8 of 11: Frame of Building]
The second building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was then demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29908/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 10 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29906/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 11 of 11: Partially Demolished]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29905/
[The East Side of the (Third) First Presbyterian Church Building]
This picture shows the back (east) side of the third First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. It features an arched window, and (presumably) the dedicatory cornerstone. Due to structural damage, this building was torn down in the 1980's, and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church-- the third building at 300 NW 4th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25008/
[First Christian Church]
Typed on the back photograph is: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY A.F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVE. MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS DATE JUL 27, 1964. It is a view of the limestone church occupying the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion. Some of the rock used in this church came from owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29977/
[First Christian Church]
On the back of photograph is typed: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY, A. F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVENUE MINERAL WELLS TEXAS DATE JUL 27 1964. The First Christian church occupies the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue (the address on the photograph was A.F. Weaver's home.) Some of the limestone used to build the church was donated by latter-day owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie, where the first meeting of the Northwest Texas Cattle Raisers' Association was held in 1876. Oliver Loving's son, J.C. Loving, wrote a letter to northwest Texas ranchers after the meeting, inviting them to meet the following February in Graham, where the Association was organized. C.C. Slaughter, once the richest man in Texas, owned the Rock Pens at the time of the Stock Raisers' meeting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29978/
[First Presbyterian Church - 1 of 13: Front View]
This photograph is the first in a series of pictures of architectural details that was taken prior to demolition of the Presbyterian church of Mineral Wells. The first church in Mineral Wells built by the Presbyterians in 1883 was located at the southwest corner of what is now the Crazy Hotel block. The early church served both the Presbyterian and Baptist Churches, and was sold to the Baptist congregation. The First Presbyterian Church was built at 300 NW 4th Avenue in 1896, and burned in 1908 This domed structure replaced it. This picture shows the front entrance to the Sanctuary of this second First Presbyterian Church in Mineral Wells, Texas, built in 1909, at this location. This picturesque building survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed the two-by-three city block area surrounding it. The building suffered serious structural deterioration to its foundation, and was replaced in the the 1980's by a more modern structure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25022/
[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]
This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25015/
[First Presbyterian Church - 3 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fourth in a series of pictures, showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows the dome over the Sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25032/
[First Presbyterian Church - 4 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fourth in a series of pictures of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. This picture shows the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church and the dome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25035/
[First Presbyterian Church --5 of 13: Front Entrance]
Shown here is the sixth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows a close-up of the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25034/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 6 of 13: Dome Detail]
This picture is the seventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. It shows the dome atop the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25021/
[First Presbyterian Church -7 of 13: Dome Detail]
The seventh in a series of pictures of architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this picture is a close-up of the dome atop the sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25024/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 8 of 13: Gable Over the Entrance]
The eighth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this view is a close-up of the pediment over the front entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25039/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 9 of 13: South Side]
This photograph is the ninth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church. This picture is a view of the south side of the church, including, at left, the main entrance at southwest corner of building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25012/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 10 of 13: Close Up of Dome]
This is the tenth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church, being a close-up of the unique dome that topped the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25005/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 11 of 13: Close Up of the Dome]
This picture is the eleventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of The First Presbyterian Church. This picture details the dome atop the church in a close-up view. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25023/
[First Presbyterian Church, 13 of 13 : South Side]
The third in a series of thirteen pictures of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows details of the south side of the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25009/
[The Front entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church]
This picture of the main entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church at 300 NW 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, shows the unique dome that topped the picturesque structure. The church survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed about six city blocks surrounding it. Foundation structural damage caused the church to be replaced by a more modern structure in the 1980's. This picture is one of 43 negatives in the A. F. Weaver Collection showing construction details of the Lutheran and Presbyterian churches. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25037/
[Hell's Gate]
An old channel of the Brazos River cut a gap in a sandstone formation in the Possum Kingdom area. Water from the impounded Possum Kingdom Lake covered the area and created this spectacular scene when the Morris Shepard Dam was built by the W.P.A. for flood control in the late 1930's. For a feel of the magnitude of the vista, please note the two-story home atop the cliff to the right of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25101/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16159/
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the succeeding photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16158/
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16139/
[The Mineral Wells Police Force and City/County Ambulance Service]
Shown here is a picture of the Mineral Wells Police force and the City/County Ambulance Service, taken in 1974. From left to right are: Bennie Hutcheson, R.A. Hodges, Jim Elmore, Jimmy Davis, Walter Graves, Orville West, Montiford Parker, Henry Childress, Don Farriel, Larry Brandenburg, Bill Meaders, Raymond Jones, Mike Poe, Ricky Shank, Fred Foreman (Police Chief), Gene Knerr, Gilbert Sommerfield (Investigator), David Jared, and Ronnie Edwards. The information was taken from the back of photograph, which itself was taken at the West City Park. It is published on page 153 of A.F.Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29831/
[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]
Illustrated here is picture of a model of the Hexagon Hotel (and the only living daughter of David Galbraith, Elizabeth Sickels) that was taken about 1977. The model is now located in the Mineral Wells Historical Association's Rock School House. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20480/
[The Old Katie Ware Home, 911 North. Oak]
The old Katie Ware Home is also shown here. The style appears to be Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-style but it shows signs of extensive remodeling. Note the slightly unusual polygonal tower, and the front porch (which also serves as a car-port) that is level with the ground. It was located at 911 N. Oak Street. The photograph was taken taken during June of 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16156/
[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue
The old Katie Ware Home, of Queen Anne Style, shows possible remodeling. Please note the slightly unusual octagonal tower. Also note the front porch, level with the ground. The building was located at 911 N. Oak Avenue. It has since [2008] been demolished. The picture was taken on taken June of 1974. The picture shows the home from the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16157/
[A Piano Recital, 1 of 10]
A photograph of a piano recital, from a roll of film labeled "Ina Howard Ramsey." Mrs. Ramsey's parents once operated the former Star Boarding House on NW 2nd Street. She is shown playing an upright piano at the base of a stage in the First Presbyterian church's Fellowship Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29441/
[A Piano Recital, 2 of 10]
According to the notes that accompanied this series of negatives, a piano recital was held about the same time as the auction of Mr. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." Mr. Weaver photographed both events. The piano recital was given in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church. Ina Howard Ramsey is the pianist. Mrs. Ramsey was visiting her native home of Mineral Wells at the time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29440/
[A Piano Recital, 3 of 10]
This photograph was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The note included in this series of pictures suggests that a piano recital was held about the same time as the auction of Mr. Weaver's book. Mr. Weaver photographed both events. The site of the recital was the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church. Ina Howard Ramsey is the pianist. The recital was an entertainment for the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29439/
[A Piano Recital, 4 of 10]
This photograph is taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Mrs. Ramsey gave a piano recital in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church on August 28, 1975 as an entertainment for the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Mr. Weaver photographed this event, as well as the auction of his book. Mrs. Ramsey was born in Mineral Wells. Her parents owned the Star House--a boarding house--at what was then 315 Coke Street, but is now [2008] 315 NW 2nd Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29438/
[Piano Recital, 6 of 10]
This picture was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The photograph seems to be of a registration table at a piano recital featuring Mrs. Ramsey. The table in the background contains art work. Other pictures in this series indicate that an art show was held in conjunction with the piano recital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29436/
[A Piano Recital, 7 of 10]
A picture taken from from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The label with this roll of pictures, along with others in this series, shows Ina Howard Ramsey, the pianist, greeting Jo Losen, the Layout and Artwork Editor of "Time Was...", after her performance. Art exhibits along the wall in this picture, along with a stack of books in another photograph in this series, suggests a piano recital may have been part of a combination piano recital/art show/book sale. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29435/
[A Piano Recital, 8 of 10]
An image taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Mrs. Ramsey is shown signing Jo Losen's copy of "Time Was..." Art work in this picture seems to indicate the event was a combination piano recital and sale of Mrs. Ramsey's art work. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29434/
[A Piano Recital, 9 of 10]
Taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey", this series of pictures seems to have covered a combination piano recital/art sale. This picture is of the pianist, Ina Howard Ramsey, visiting with some of the younger members of the audience following the recital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29433/
[A Piano Recital, 10 of 10]
The pianist, Ina Howard Ramsey, seems to be announcing her next selection to the audience of a piano recital given August 28, 1975.The event took place in the Fellowship Hall of First Presbyterian church. The recital was held about the same time as the auction of the first ten copies of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells . . . .", and Mr. Weaver photographed both events. Mrs. Ramsey was an artiste as well as a pianist, and she displayed some of her art work as well as playing the piano. Mrs. Ramsey, though born in Mineral Wells in 1896 to parents who were owners of the Star House (a boarding house), was visiting Mineral Wells from her home in Oklahoma at the time of this photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29432/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 1 of 15: Will Poston]
Will Poston is shown standing in the cashier's station of his department store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). Note the conveyor system by which the cashier received cash and statements from various departments, and distributed change and receipts. Central cashiers were common in department stores from the years of the Great Depression through the time of World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29959/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 2 of 15: Will Poston Inside His Store]
Will Poston stands at the cashier's station, preparing to dispatch a runner to a clerk in his store, Poston Dry Goods, It was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29957/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 3 of 15: Will Poston Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston, seated at the cashier's station in his store, Poston Dry Goods, located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29954/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 4 of 15: Will Poston Holding Cable System]
Will Poston, standing, is poised in preparation to dispatch a container along a cable from the central cashier's office in his store, Poston Dry Goods in 1975. The store was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29951/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 5 of 15: View of Safe]
Will Poston sits next to the safe in Poston Dry Goods store in 1975. Note the lettering on the safe "Baker, Poston and Co." Also note the many ledger books, which contained the numerous accounts and records required by the store's manual bookkeeping system, around Mr. Poston. Poston's was the largest apparel store in Mineral Wells after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the glass show cases in Poston's had come from the earlier Howards' store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29940/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 6 of 15: With Display Case]
Will Poston stands with an antique [in 2008] thread (Please not the markings, "Clark", "O.N.T." "White" "Colors" on the drawers) cabinet in his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). The year of the picture is 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29939/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 7 of 15: With Display Case, Drawers Open]
Will Poston stands in the sewing department of his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). The display case is open to show the different types and colors of sewing thread in stock. Colored threads were separated from white for easier selection, and both were available in various brands, spooled quantities and thread sizes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29937/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 9 of 15: Outside of Store Front]
Will Poston stands in front of his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). Poston's was the largest department store in Mineral Wells after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the glass show cases in Poston's came from the earlier Howard Brothers store. These cases are on display in the store. The store itself is now the Mineral Wells branch of the Palo Pinto County courthouse. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29928/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 10 of 15: Inside View of Store]
A photograph of Will Poston and a cashier inside Poston Dry Goods store, 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. [Will Poston is in cashier's/accountant's office. The cashier is preparing to pull a cord to set the cash trolley system in motion Piles of trousers take up the foreground] A central cashier's stand was what is now known as "state of the art" near the middle of twentieth century. This one was located in a corner of the mens' trousers department. The historic Poston store is now a Mineral Wells annex of the Palo Pinto County courthouse. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29922/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 11 of 15: Inside View of Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The picture gives a broad view of the boot department of the Western attire carried by the store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29942/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 12 of 15: Inside View of his Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, preparing to dispatch a container to his cashier's department. A view of the boot department, with a typical stock of Western boots, is displayed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29946/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 14 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston surveys the domain in his store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The photograph was taken about 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29947/