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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Our City
A photograph, taken from Welcome Mountain looking West down NW 4th Street, of unknown date is illustrated here. The small brick building in 4th Street is the Crazy Well. The first Crazy Water Hotel (left middle of picture) was built on same location as present Crazy Water hotel. The present hotel is much larger and extends to the Crazy Well. Note the Crazy Flats (drinking pavilion with apartments) in foreground. Note the first Catholic Church, on West Mountain. The West Ward School and the High School are in upper left quadrant of picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16225/
The Oxford Hotel
The Hubbard Street Trolley car is shown at Oak and Hubbard Streets on its way west to Pinto Lake, next to the Oxford Hotel. The First State Bank and Trust was located in the northwest (near) corner of the hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16272/
Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex[as]
Shown here is a photograph titled "Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex." It shows the completed building of the Oxford Hotel, and First State Bank and Trust Company, located at Oak and Hubbard. Note the period automobile. Written under the picture is: "I was just getting along alright [sic] write and let me know [lacuna?] you all are getting along. Will go to Wichita Falls next wk" [Signature illegible] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16208/
[Page from Pamphlet about Palo Pinto County Water]
This picture appears to be the battered remains of a pamphlet that extols the water of Palo Pinto County. Its provenance remains, unfortunately, still [2014] unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60969/
Pal-Pinto-Crystal Wells Bath House
The Pal-Pinto Crystal Wells Bath House is illustrated here, although its location is unknown. Thelma Doss wrote in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" that, "It was a long, rambling structure with a large number of rooms for bathing purposes for both ladies and gentleman. There was a grand selection of baths such as Plain, Turkish, Salt Glow, Russian Massage, and Vapor baths. This large rambling structure looked more like a house for a large family than a business." This picture occurs on page 65 of A. F. Weaver's book in both First and Second Editions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20335/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 9, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 11, 1974
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417293/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 71, Ed. 1 Thursday, October 9, 1975
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417292/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 82, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 25, 1975
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417315/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 102, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 13, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417314/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 103, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 20, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417297/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 110, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 8, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417305/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 120, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 16, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417308/
[The Palo Pinto County Courthouse]
This picture illustrates Palo Pinto County's third Courthouse, completed in 1941 by the WPA. The rock retaining wall was constructed out of materials taken from the second (1884) courthouse. A World War II Memorial stands in the foreground of the picture, and a granite marker at the far right commemorates the county's 1957 Centennial. Native pecan, elm and oak trees surround the county seat. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25098/
[The Palo Pinto County Fair Parade of 1912]
The Palo Pinto County Fair Parade of 1912 is shown, with a horse-drawn float, more horses, an automobile and people in parade. The "Queens Float" featured Queen Apolline Dow of Oran. The outriders were Ferdinand Dow, Ernest Clark, John T. Bowman. Maids of Honor were Alma Herndon, Carrie Stephenson, Ruby Johnson, Mae Belle Smith, Nina Mae Haynes and Cleo Frost. The parade is shown moving south in the 200 block of North Oak Street. (Please note the tracks of the trolley system, which operated from 1907 to 1913.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16300/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 87, No. 28, Ed. 1 Wednesday, July 24, 1963
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417288/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 89, No. 2, Ed. 1 Tuesday, June 30, 1964
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417285/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 89, No. [22], Ed. 1 Wednesday, December 1, 1965
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417307/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 89, No. 48, Ed. 1 Wednesday, May 25, 1966
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417300/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 89, No. 49, Ed. 1 Wednesday, June 22, 1966
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417294/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 89, No. [56], Ed. 1 Wednesday, July 7, 1965
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417312/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 90, No. 44, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 15, 1967
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417313/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [102], No. [20], Ed. 1 Thursday, November 16, 1978
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417296/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [102], No. [23], Ed. 1 Thursday, December 7, 1978
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417309/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [102], No. [24], Ed. 1 Thursday, December 14, 1978
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417316/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 44, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 19, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417301/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 47, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 10, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417306/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 57, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 12, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417311/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 71, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 20, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417290/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 80, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 21, 1980
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417310/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [103], No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 18, 1980
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417302/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [103], No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 4, 1980
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417281/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [103], No. 30, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 22, 1981
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417187/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 80, No. 46, Ed. 1 Friday, May 10, 1957
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417295/
[Palo Pinto General Hospital]
Palo Pinto General Hospital opened in 1970 and is located west of Mineral Wells. It has been, since this picture was taken, enlarged and remodeled extensively. This hospital replaced the downtown Nazareth Hospital. While the hospital was been built, the first two floors of the Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 168. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39173/
PALOCADE Palo Pinto County
Palo Pinto County celebrated 100 years of existence in 1957. Shown here is a picture of the cover of the official program of the pageant that commemorated this milestone in the county's history. Palo Pinto County began with its formation by act of the Texas legislature in 1856, and its subsequent organization in 1857. As part of the year-long centennial observance, a pageant noting significant events in the county's past was presented at the local football stadium. The program itself contains 28 pages of tidbits of history about people, places and events in the county's heritage, along with a schedule of events organized by the official Centennial Committee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25091/
Palocade - Palo Pinto County - Official Centennial Program - front side
The obverse (front) page of a souvenir program from the Palo Pinto Centennial production, "Palocade," which tells the history of Palo Pinto County, which includes the names of the Centennial Queen and her court, is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16328/
[Panorama 1974 (fourth)]
A view of Mineral Wells,is shown, looking southwest from East Mountain over the First National Bank (now Bank of America). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16242/
[Panorama 1974 (ninth)]
A panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church (in front) is show, taken from Welcome Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16237/
Panorama of Camp Wolters, TX
This picture is a panoramic photograph of Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas, the largest infantry replacement center in 1941. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Target Range, Regimental Area No. 4, Dental Clinic,Guest House, Service Club, Theater, Regimental Area No. 3, Infantry Replacement Center/Headquarters Area, Regimental Area No. 6, Warehouse Area, Corps Area Service Command and Hospital Area, Regimental Area No. 2, Regimental Area No. 1, and Machine Gun Range. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16323/
[A Panorama of Mineral Wells, Texas: Looking East]
Shown here is Mineral Wells, Texas looking east. This photograph was taken from Northwest Mountain, by A.F. Weaver on September 5, 1997. The Baker Hotel is in the center of the picture, with the Second Crazy Water Hotel in front of and left of the Baker; and the Nazareth Hospital, to the left of the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20346/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (eleventh)]
A panorama of East Hubbard Street, taken from Welcome Mountain, showing Elmwood cemetery is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16235/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (fifth) ]
A panoramic view, probably from South Mountain, looking north-east is shown here. A portion of the mountain has been dug out and leveled for a gasoline station. Also visible are the Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) to the left of center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16241/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16245/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (second)]
This picture shows a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16244/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (seventh)]
A panoramic view of the city from Welcome Mountain is shown. Elmwood Cemetery is visible in the upper left part of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16239/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (sixth)]
A panorama, taken from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over North Oak Street in Mineral Wells. The Convention Center, Box Factory, and The Crazy Water Hotel are visible. Native plants are visible in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16240/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (tenth)]
Shown here is a panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church, taken from the west. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16236/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (third)]
illustrated here is a panorama of Mineral Wells, looking east from West Mountain. The Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) are visible in center of photograph. Native plants are pictured in the left of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16243/
[A Panorama Taken in1974 (eighth)]
A panorama of houses and streets, taken from from Welcome Mountain s shown here. The purpose of the photograph remains uncertain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16238/
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its proximity to the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex, Lake Mineral Wells State Park is one of the more popular State Parks in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38090/