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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Photographic Miscellany of Mineral Wells]
Shown here is a possible composite picture of the attractions about Mineral Wells. It features a panorama of Camp Wolters, dated 1941; A scenic drive, Mineral Wells; the hospital & headquarters Areas; Regimental Areas 4 & 5, Camp Wolters. Several small towns(e.g. Salesville, Graford, and Santo) are shown as existing--but nothing more. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39206/
The Piedmont Hotel
The Piedmont Hotel, located on NE 2nd Avenue and East Hubbard Street, was demolished to make room for the Baker Hotel Garage. Before its destruction, it was used as an office for the Army Engineers during the construction of Possum Kingdom Dam. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20291/
The Piedmont Hotel [The First Piedmont Hotel]
A picture (perhaps an early photograph) of the first Piedmont Hotel, its location being unknown. This photograph appears on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," Second Edition, 1988. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20292/
Piedmont Hotel - [The First Piedmont With Numerous Individuals on Porches]
The First Piedmont Hotel. This photograph was probably taken in the early twentieth century, judging by the attire of the men photographed. The photograph appears on page 104 of "Time Was...", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20286/
Piedmont Hotel - [The Second Piedmont Hotel]
This photograph occurs on page 104 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells" (first edition) by A. F. Weaver. The caption reads: "The Second Piedmont Hotel located on 2nd Avenue [sic] and East Hubbard was demolished to give room for the Baker Hotel Garage. It was used as an office for the Army Engineers during the construction of Possum Kingdom Dam." This hotel was probably located on the same site as the first Piedmont Hotel (a two story wooden structure) a picture of which is also on page 104 of the same edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20228/
[A Play Day at Elmhurst Park]
Girls are shown playing a basketball game in Mineral Wells' Elmhurst Park, about 1910. The scene catches a "Jump Ball" during progress of the game. Please note the women's uniforms, and also the enthusiastic crowd. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16316/
"The Play Place of The South"
An avioculum (bird's eye-view) of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken from East mountain and looking west-southwest. In the middle foreground are: The Crazy Flats and the third Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion. The "Crazy" Businesses burned in 1925, and the present hotel that replaced them covers the entire city block. It has since been converted [2007]to a Retirement Home. Visible also are the First Presbyterian Church, which was erected in 1909; and the Old High School, erected in 1915. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16228/
Points of Interest in and About Mineral Wells
A photograph of a collage in a Mineral Wells Area Chamber of Commerce advertisement includes a postcard that pictures points of interest in and about the city. Pictured are: An aerial view of Camp Wolters, the Recreation Center showing a theater, gymnasium, and PX, with an inset of the base hospital; Possum Kingdom Dam and part of the eponymous lake; a local beauty queen; an aerial view of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas; Lake Mineral Wells (with the island that was inundated when the dam was subsequently raised); a view from Inspiration Point south of the city; and the Baker Hotel. The text publicizes the various assets and tourist attractions to be found in and around the "City Built on Water." One photograph in the collage is upside-down. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29835/
[Pole Vaulting at Elmhurst Park]
Information on the back of the photograph states: "Games (pole vaulting) at Elmhurst Park two miles southwest of Mineral Wells where [the] sewage treatment plant is now located. Picture taken around 1910." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20312/
[A Portrait Presentation at KORC]
Mrs. Jess (Ruby) Shattles presents a photographic picture of Achilles Corcanges, founder and owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells to the same Mr. Corcanges. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studio at 412 N. Oak Avenue. The picture was taken about 1946, when station KORC opened. The unidentified gentleman, with his back to the photographer,on the left is believed to be Mr. Shattles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16270/
[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]
A view of part of Possum Kingdom Lake from Observation Point, taken August 11, 1974. Although it is not readily visible, the Morris Sheppard Dam, which impounds the Brazos River to form Possum Kingdom Lake, is on the far right edge of the picture. The view is from a vantage point approximately 150 feet above the water, which in its turn is approximately 190 feet deep at this point. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38094/
[A Post Card of a Football Team]
This postcard, taken around 1909, features the Mineral Wells High School football team. Please note the guards, hanging around their necks, that were used to protect the noses of the players. Those guards were held in place by means of a strap that went around the head, and were further kept in place by clenching the teeth on a rubber bit on the inside of the guard. The back of the card lists the players' names from top left: 1) Jessie Turner, 2) Tulane Smith, 3) J.C. Hayes, 4) Faburt Holmes , 5) George Oliver, 6) Blake Turner, 7) Bertram Hedrich, 8) Lamar McNew, and 9) Mr. Dinsmore. Front row 10) Carodine Hootin 11) Gordon Whatley, 12) Vernon Durham, 13) Fred McClurhin, 14) Achie Holdrige, 15) Chester Baughn, and 16) Hugh Brewster. Jess Turner(1) was later a member of Mineral Wells' only undefeated team in 1912. C.N. Turner, father of teammates Jess(1) and Blake Turner(6), purchased one of the early telephone companies in Palo Pinto County. He operated it with his sons as a family business. Jess Turner became a pioneer in the telephone business, and purchased the other family interests in 1924 to become sole owner of the family enterprise. His son, Jess Turner, Jr., operated the telephone company following World war II, relinquishing his position in October of 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25054/
Post Offfice, Mineral Wells, Texas, 1930 (?)
This building once housed the third Post Office in Mineral Wells. The body of the photograph is marked POST OFFICE MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS 1936. Please observe the automobiles parked in front, on the sloping street. It was the issue of insufficient parking that caused the Post Office to move. The building presently [2013] houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39194/
[The Presbyterian Church: First Building]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60896/
Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells
Written on the back of the photograph is: "Presbyterian Church & Manse N.W. 4th Ave. & [NW]2nd St. Built 1896, Burned 1908" This was the first Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells. It was replaced, after it burned in 1908, at the same location the next year by a unique domed church that endured for some seventy years. Deterioration of the foundation of the second church building dictated its prudent replacement by a third building at this same location in the early 1980's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29454/
[A Program for "Lazy Town", an Opera in Two Acts]
A program for "Lazy Town - An Opera in Two Acts", presented by Sam Houston School on May 14, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16353/
[A Program for Mineral Wells High School Commencement 1934]
A program from the Mineral Wells Commencement of 1934, which was held in the still-standing Convention Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16351/
[A Program for "Sunny of Sunnyside"- - an Operetta]
A program for "Sunny of Sunnyside - An Operetta", presented at the Travis School Auditorium on April 29-30, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16352/
A Program for the Coronation of the Queen at MWHS, 1934
The program for the Eighth Annual Mineral Wells High School Coronation of the Queen, held on January 18, 1934. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16345/
A Program for the "Victory Queen" and "Victory on the Home Front"
A program for The Victory Queen and Victory on the Home Front, presented by Mineral Wells High School at the Convention Hall on March 8, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16354/
[A Public Mineral Water Well]
A picture that was used on the dust cover of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition, 1988 It is identified as "Visitors to Mineral Wells at 'Public Mineral Water Well' around 1910. The picture was furnished by Mrs. Raymond York. On left is Ellie Landry of Dallas. Second from right is Mrs. William Whitehead Gardner of Lawrence, Texas, grandmother of Raymond York of Mineral Wells." There were public drinking fountains in town where free water was available to visitors. This particular fountain's location remains unidentified. This picture appears, superficially, to be a duplicate of the previous one; but closer examination suggests that it is a composite picture, with the background being a painted backdrop. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25046/
[The R. B. Preston Building]
Written on back of the photograph is: "R.B. Preston Building[,] Corner of Mesquite & Wall." A 1909 City Directory lists the address of the Preston Building as 110-116 North Mesquite, currently the location of the Baker Hotel, built at this location in 1929. The back of a duplicate picture indicates that the building was the Masonic Building; the 1909 directory lists the Masonic Hall at 113 S. Mesquite--the next block south. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20299/
[A Railroad Engine]
This picture illustrates engine Number 5 of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad in action. Please observe the unusually small cowcatcher and the lack of a visible whistle atop the steam dome. Further information about it may be found in Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells", second edition, on page 91. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20349/
The Raines Building, Mineral Wells
The Raines Building located at 101 N.E. 1st Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas, was once a drug store, then a department store, later Pemberton's Appliance Store; in 1975 it was Calhoun Furniture Company and in 2008 is the home of Downtown Video. This photograph is found on page 126 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. Note the clothing of the people, the absence of any traffic, and the bunting on the building. A legend in white ink on the lower left-hand corner of the photograph reads: Texas Trade Review." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39216/
[The Ray Hamilton Home - 1016 SW 7th Avenue]
The Ray Hamilton Home at 1016 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The style is Queen Anne, free classic. Please note the inset arches and the Palladian windows. The style was popular around the turn of the twentieth century. The house shows very slight evidence of remodeling. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16155/
Remember the Good Old Times Back in 1906-1907 [Newspaper Article]
A "Mineral Wells Index" newspaper article, dated 1933, it is titled: "Remember the Good Old Days Back in 1906-1907", showing two views of Elmhurst Park. One view shows an automobile and streetcar at the entrance; and the other shows the casino located in the park, with the lake in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16310/
The Right Ticket
An old advertisement for Mineral Wells, touting the "pleasures" to be had in the city. The lady's crown displays the legend "Health & Pleasure." The "Pleasures" obtainable in the city need not be discussed, as they are plainly describedd in the picture, which may be found on page 91 of the second edition of A. F. Weaver's book, "Time Was..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20347/
[The Road to Mineral Wells]
The 1936 opening of the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Weatherford, now known as Highway US 180. This was a Works Project Administration (WPA) highway, built during the early "Great Depression" recovery period. The photograph is looking west toward Mineral Wells, and the Baker Hotel may be seen faintly on the horizon at left center of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20466/
[A Rock Outcrop on Mineral Wells "Mountain"]
A rock outcrop, and vegetation typical of the hills (local custom calls them "Mountains") in Mineral Wells. Some of the houses of the town can be seen through the bushes. This photograph is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" were also on the envelope. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20379/
Roundtree Sanitarium
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60913/
[Sam Whatley & Mr. & Mrs. Evans Holland ]
Sam Whatley (left), representing Young Motor Company, presents a check to Mr. & Mrs. Evans Holland (right) for the winning slogan, "Cadillac Every Time for Better Motor Service." Sam was service manager for the motor company, located at 316 East Hubbard Street. The picture is featured in "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on page 185. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39187/
[Sam Whatley Presenting Check to Slogan Contest Winner]
Sam Whatley (dressed in a Cadillac uniform), the Service Manager for the Young Motor Company (a local Cadillac dealership), presents a check to Mr. and Mrs. Evans Holland, winners of a slogan contest. The winning slogan was "Cadillac every time for better motor service." The microphone above them is labeled as belonging to station KORC, which opened December 5, 1946. It changed its name to KJSA in 1983, when the station was sold to Jerry Snyder. A colophon on the lower right identifies "SW Photo" as the photographer. (The picture occurs on page 185 of TIME WAS, second edition.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16262/
Sancura Sprudel Water
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60960/
[The Sangcura Sprudel Fire]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well drinking pavilion was originally located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. It was moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches on the building were enclosed, and it was converted to a rooming house. It burned December 5, 1973, just five minutes before the start of the Mineral Wells Christmas Parade. The remaining part of the Period Hotel on N.W. 4th Avenue, which also burned at another date, was converted into apartments that can be seen through the smoke in the upper left of the picture. This photograph is found on page 64 of A.F Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells,"' First Edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20304/
[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]
The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20334/
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Drinking Pavilion was originally located at 800 NW Second Avenue. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, the porches enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The Crazy Water bottling plant was built on this site in 1919. The rooming house that was the former Sangcura-Sprudel drinking Pavilion burned on December 5, 1973, just five minutes before Mineral Wells' annual Christmas Parade was scheduled to start. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24970/
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura Sprudel Wells. On back of photograph is written: "Located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue." The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street. The porches were enclosed and it was turned into a rooming house. The building burned down in 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29821/
Sanitarium
The Mineral Wells Sanitarium was located at 315 NW 1st Avenue. It was later owned and operated by B.H. Milling before he built the Milling Sanitarium. The building was torn down and replaced by Willimann's Pharmacy. Currently [2010] the Woodsmen of the World club resides at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60880/
[A Scene at auction of First Edition of TIME WAS]
Attendants at an auction of the First Edition of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" shown here, are, left to right: Mrs. Richard Warren;, Mrs. Morris Thompkins; Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; Mr. A.F. Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore; Auctioneer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20411/
[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]
The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29962/
[The Second Post Office]
This picture illustrates the building that housed the second Post Office in Mineral Wells. It was located at 2310 SE 1st Avenue. Note the men: Four of them are in shirt-sleeves, and two are properly dressed (for the era) in jackets. None exhibit the "Cowboy" image of the nineteenth century, so popular in the late twentieth century. Note also the complete lack of automobiles. The picture appears to have been taken possibly in the 1890's (?) It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on p. 149. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39211/
Service Club, Camp Wolters, Texas
An illustration of the Service Club at Camp Wolters, which was located just outside Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. Once the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center during World War II, Camp [later Fort] Wolters was re-opened during the Korean Conflict, and again during the Vietnam War. This portrait of the service club is probably a photograph taken from an old picture postcard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20463/
Sewerage Disposal Plant
Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25102/
Sewing Room
The back of the photograph exhibits a note that this picture was copied from the "Burro", which is the Mineral Wells High School yearbook. The "Sewing Room" was a classroom in the Lillian Peek Home Economics building on the grounds of the high school. The Lillian Peek cottage was built by the WPA in 1937, and was the first free- standing house built specifically for Home Economics education in the State of Texas. It was "Current state of the art" when it was completed. The building now houses the Creative Arts Center, and is used by the local Art Club as an art workshop and museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25050/
Site of the New Frost Building
Construction of Frost Building in Mineral Wells, Texas. A legend on the bottom reads: "Photograph by McClure." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16278/
[Sllew La Renim]
The caption on page 118 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" (first edition, 1974) by A. F. Weaver, states: "The "SLLEW La RENIM Club was 'Mineral Wells' spelled backwards. The members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers." The ladies of the time used parasols to shade themselves from the sun. (There are seven ladies in the picture, but only six are identified. As deduced from the notes on the back of the picture, Mary Lee Hayes is believed to be the third lady in line in the picture.) The Mineral Wells Sanitarium, originally known as The Exchange Hotel, is shown in the upper left of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38074/
[The Sllew La Renim Club]
The "Sllew La Remin" ("Mineral Wells", spelled backwards) Club formed in 1912. Pictured are: Front Row: Frances Young Mullman; Ida M. Lindon Myers; Eula Strain Harlacker; Mrs. Fred Burman (Sponsor); Mae Cowling; Second Row: Mae Byrd Harris; Mary Lee Hayes Harbinson; Cleo Frost Bowman; Mae Belle Smith; Ruby Johnson Green; Ernestine Pollard; Emma Beetham Brandt; Upper Row: [---] Brown; Frances Hayes; Adelle Watson; Mary Sorley. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39256/
[The Smith Memorial at Elmwood Cemetery]
This is a picture of a monument that is to be found in the Elmwood Cemetery. Two Confederate soldiers with rifles (who presumably never went to war) stand at the top of a scrolled pediment that bears the number "32" amidst foliage. Beneath it are crossed sabres. At the very bottom. under the name "Smith", is the motto: "Charity and Humanity Our Religion" in raised letters. This monument may be the grave of the Cicero Smith family. He was the President of Lake View Scenic Railway, also known as the Dinkey Cars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39250/
[Social Security Award for Boyce Ditto]
An insurance award from the Social Security Administration for Boyce Ditto in 1948. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16334/
[Some Gentlemen in Front of the Oxford Hotel]
Seated in front of the Oxford Hotel, from left to right, are: R.B. Preston, Mr. Dick from Millsap, and Stith Edmondson. (Mr. Edmondson was an early sheriff of Palo Pinto County.) Dr. J. H. McCracken can be seen in the window. The First State Bank and Trust Company was located in the corner of this building, later called the Firstron Building. A sign on the building in the left corner states "$15.00 Fine for Spitting on Sidewalk". This picture appears on page 103 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." second edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20298/