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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1910-1919
 Language: English
Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue (west of the Crazy Water Well and second Crazy Drinking Pavilion) is shown here. The number "1921" on the picture appears to refer to some sort of set It is not a date. Please note the complete absence of automobiles in the picture, and the unhitched buggy to the right foreground. (The gasoline powered "Dinky Car" tracks, which served this area of NW 1st Avenue from 1905 to 1909, are not visible here, nor does the street appear to be paved. The city streets were paved in 1914.) A more modern brick building was added to this wooden pavilion in 1909; both structures are visible in pictures taken during a Woodmen of the World convention in 1911. (Note: The newer Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning when the second Carlsbad Pavilion shut down operations during World War II.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

[The Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: Spectators are shown here, at a spring play-day frolic at Elmhurst Park around 1910. The popular park once boasted a Casino, a Dancing Pavilion, Exhibit Halls, and Outdoor Sports Fields. It hosted the County Fair and sports events until 1913. On the closure of Elmhurst Park, the City of Mineral Wells became the owner of the property. It was used for a housing development during World War II to accommodate families of soldiers and civilian workers at Camp Wolters. The City of Mineral Wells built city's water treatment facilities on the site of the former park after World War II.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Foster Hotel]

[The Foster Hotel]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture depicts a hotel--done in Queen Anne style (Spindle-work subtype). Please note the unusual two-story wraparound porch, also with spindle-work. It appears to have been excerpted from a fragment of advertising copy that gives the name of the building as "The Foster", and extols the owner (Mr. T.J. Foster) as "...an old hotel hand of large acquaintance and wide experience, who has studied the wants and needs of his guests[,] and loses no opportunity of making them comfortable." Polk's Directory for 1910 lists the proprietor of the hotel as F. J. Kowalski. A hand-written note on the edge of the negative (not visible in the picture) states: "NW 1st Ave 6th Street." This address is only approximate. A more accurate address is given in the photograph "The Foster Hotel", also to be found in this collection. Although it is not certain, the clothes of the people shown standing around the hotel strongly suggest that the picture was taken early in the twentieth century. A barely-legible colophon, appearing to read "FONE" appears in the lower left-hand corner.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Gibson Well

Gibson Well

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: The discovery of mineral water, and its reported healing powers, sparked an influx of health-seeking visitors in 1881-82. A flurry of drilling activity resulted in incorporation of the city of Mineral Wells in 1882, as water was sought to satisfy the booming market; so much so that no one remembers the order in which the wells were drilled. The Gibson well, however, was one of the early ones. Located at 705 NW 2nd Avenue, it grew into one of the largest parks and drinking pavilions in town. The gasoline-powered "Dinky cars" of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway passed by it every quarter-hour, from 1905 to 1909, on their journeys to and from Lake Pinto. The Gibson property was acquired by the Crazy. It was known as the Crazy Park in 1938, and it was made into a beautiful botanical garden. It is currently the site of the First Christian Church.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Gibson Well- - Souvenir Photograph]

[The Gibson Well- - Souvenir Photograph]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture appears to be a souvenir photograph of the Gibson Well drinking pavilion and park, one of the earliest mineral water supply spots in Mineral Wells. It grew into one of the larger parks and pavilions in town. The gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway passed here every quarter-hour (from 1905 to 1909) on their journey to and from Lake Pinto. The Crazy Industries had acquired the property by 1938, and it became known as Crazy Park, a beautiful botanical park. The mineral water industry became a victim of the FDA and the wartime activities during World War II. As a result, the mineral water pavilions, along with other parts of the local health industry, died a slow death. The First Christian Church now occupies the site of the Gibson pavilion.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Oak Street,  Looking North

Oak Street, Looking North

Date: 1910/1914
Creator: unknown
Description: An early view of Oak Street (now Oak Avenue), looking North is shown here. The first intersecting road is Hubbard Street. Part of the Oxford Hotel is visible on the southeast corner of Hubbard and Oak. Please note the utter lack of street lights. Street car tracks and an overhead cable run on Oak. Mineral Wells Electric System (Street Car) ceased operation in 1913. The downtown streets were paved in 1914. A hardware store, possibly Davidson's, is on the southwest corner of Hubbard and Oak.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Oak Street ,  Looking South

Oak Street , Looking South

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: We have here a picture of Oak Street, looking South. The Poston Company and the Palace Saloon are easily visible in photograph. The wording "Fishburn Dallas" appears on the photograph. The unpaved street, several horses and wagons in picture date the picture to an era before 1914, when the street was paved.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Public Mineral Water Well]

[A Public Mineral Water Well]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: A picture that was used on the dust cover of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition, 1988 It is identified as "Visitors to Mineral Wells at 'Public Mineral Water Well' around 1910. The picture was furnished by Mrs. Raymond York. On left is Ellie Landry of Dallas. Second from right is Mrs. William Whitehead Gardner of Lawrence, Texas, grandmother of Raymond York of Mineral Wells." There were public drinking fountains in town where free water was available to visitors. This particular fountain's location remains unidentified. This picture appears, superficially, to be a duplicate of the previous one; but closer examination suggests that it is a composite picture, with the background being a painted backdrop.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]

[A Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: Information taken from the back of the photograph reads: "Entrance to Elmhurst Park with trolley car. Picture taken around 1910. Entrance to the park with a swinging bridge over Pollard Creek later taken over and made into the Mineral Wells dump grounds. About 2 miles southwest of Mineral Wells."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Vichy Well and Natatorium]

[The Vichy Well and Natatorium]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: Found on page 66 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells, Second Edition", the caption for this photograph reads: "First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, later the Beach, and then The Standard Well. It was torn down, and the USO was built during World War II (now [2007] the North Oak Community Center)." For the entertainment of visiting "health seekers", the Standard Pavilion offered a swimming pool, skating rink, dance floor with "name band" visiting musicians, amphitheater, playgrounds with band, children's swings with slide, and a flower garden in addition to its drinking pavilion. The building was home to the Mineral Wells Senior Center for a time. Still known as the Community Center, the building has recently [2007] been leased to the Crazy Water Festival Association, and is slated for renovation.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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