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[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]
A very early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken around 1882) from East Mountain and looking southwest is illustrated here. Locations identified by numbers are: 1: Judge Lynch's cabin, now Lynch Plaza at S. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Street; 2: The Mesquite Street well, middle of NE 1st Avenue (the second well in town, now [2008] abandoned); 3:The current center of downtown Mineral Wells, showing the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180); 4: The current Fire and Police Departments; 5: S. Oak Avenue; 6: The Southern House Hotel; 7: The present "Business District", NE 1st Avenue; and 8: N. Oak Avenue (a residential area at the time.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20219/
[The Middle Panel of the Oldest Known Panorama of Mineral Wells]
Shown here is the middle photograph of three that are arranged on pages 40 and 41 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", to create the "Earliest known panoramic view of Mineral Wells around 1882." It was taken from East Mountain looking to the southwest. The photograph includes the center of today's [2008]downtown Mineral Wells. A large white two-story building is shown at the left center of the picture on West Hubbard Street, at the site of the (later) Southern Hotel. The building at the far left edge of the picture occupies on the site of the current Mineral Wells Fire and Police Departments in the 200 block of South Oak Avenue. The center of Mineral Wells' Business District is now [2008] the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38089/
[In Front of Schoolhouse, ca. 1885]
The back of this photograph shows three notes: 1: "Taken in front of school house about 1885." (This photograph appears to be of the students and teachers of Mineral Wells' first public school, the "Little Rock Schoolhouse," built in 1884.) 2: "Donated by James H. Perry", and 3: "Some are dead. Some are married, and we are all scattered, never to meet on earth again." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25072/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall, built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20358/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A large group of people, most sitting on donkeys, are shown out front of the Hexagon Hotel. Donkeys were used to transport visitors to the top of East Mountain for an overview of the City of Mineral Wells. It appears the party in this picture is preparing for such a trip. The building behind the Hexagon is the electrical (DC) generating plant. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20352/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel was built in 1895 by David G. Galbraith, the inventor of the paper clip, and co-developer of acetate synthetic fiber. According to Ellen Puerzer ("The Octagon House Inventory", Eight-saquare Publishing, copyright 2011), the building was twelve-sided, clad with clapboard, built on a stone foundation. Two English stonemasons did all stonework, presumably also the work on the DC generating plant next to the hotel. The rooms within were hexagon-shaped, with a bath being shared between every two rooms. The well-ventilated "honeycomb" structure (a master-stroke in the days before air-conditioning)opened in December 1897. The stone building behind and left of the Hotel is the plant for generating electricity used for a light in every room in the hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20365/
[Barber Lake]
Many property owners in early Mineral Wells had their own water wells, but the city pumped water to a small standpipe on East Mountain for distribution to the city. When the wells became insufficient to supply the city's needs, Barber Lake was built in the Barber Addition - in the northeast part of town - as Mineral Wells' first city water supply lake. Around 1905, Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke built a dam across Pollard Creek west of the city to form Lake Pinto, the city's next water supply. Barber Lake, the City's first municipal water supply, can still be found southeast of Cullen Grimes School (built in 1920 at 1800 NE 1st. Avenue as Barber School: the name was changed to Cullen Grimes in honor of a long-time principal when it was enlarged in 1942.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20387/
[A Buggy in front of Presbyterian Church]
A copy of this picture is found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", Second Edition", on page 188. The caption states "Cumberland Presbyterian Church at 901 North Oak Avenue." Note the surrey with the fringe on top. The person in the buggy has been identified as Mrs. Flora Howard, daughter of William Winfield Hayworth "Howard", the minister of the church. Howard owned a hardware store, going under the name "W.W. Howard." He is also listed as a member of the I.O.O.F. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church takes its name from Cumberland Street, Pennsylvania, where the sub-denomination was founded. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church is currently [2014] in Newberry, Texas. The building was sold to the Church of Christ, torn down and rebuilt. The North Oak Church of Christ still stands [in 2011] at this location, 901 N. Oak Ave. The picture is reliably dated to have been taken in 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24995/
[The Foster Hotel]
A note on the back of this picture identifies it as the Foster House. It was located at 202 NW 6th Street (given in Polk's Directory for 1909 as "202 West Moore", two blocks north of the Crazy Well) and facing 6th Street. It was one block west of the Hexagon House, and within two blocks of other wells. The style of the building appears to be Queen Anne, spindle-work subtype, with paired gables. The number "2231" is written on the photograph. A railroad ran a main trunk line on the other side of the hotel's block. It was built before 1904 but further history of this early hotel is not known at this time [2008]. Another picture (The Foster Hotel: Second Photograph, which please see) supplies a few more details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20313/
[The Donkey Trail up East Mountain - 1901]
A trail ride, going up East Mountain on burros, is pictured here. The participants listed on back of picture are: "Jessie Padgett - Dallas, Mr. Oscar Levin, Miss [unidentified], Mr. Coy Wimberly - Tyler, Miss [unidentified], Miss Burriss - Terrel, Mr. Jacobs - Atlanta, Lilian Webster - Dallas, Raymond Caruth - Dallas, Johnetta Armstrong - Dallas, Mr. Cousins - Tyler, Maggie Street - Dallas, Katie Elliott - Dallas, Miss Hyman - Min. Wells, Mr. Nance - Dallas, Mr. Brown - Tyler, Mary Roberts - Terrel, Will Caruty - Dallas. Mineral Wells, June 11, 1901." Burro rides on the Donkey Trail up East Mountain were a popular pastime around the turn of the twentieth century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25001/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]
A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16250/
[The First Motorcycle in Mineral Wells]
A caption, taken from "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, on page 116 states: "Pictured in 1908 is Frank Richards, owner of the first motorcycle bought in Mineral Wells. D. C. Harris owned the second motorcycle." Frank Richards was the manager of the Star Well during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular health spa resort, and the boy on the motorbike with him has been identified as his son, Robert Frank Richards. D. C. Harris was the postmaster, and served as Mayor of the city at one time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38072/
[A Mayor's Granddaughter on a Donkey]
A copy of this photograph may be found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, on page 151. The caption reads, "Mary Berta Perry, granddaughter of Mayor Laverty, 1908." Jim Laverty was the first City Marshall of Mineral Wells. He was elected mayor when the City was first incorporated in 1882. The first incorporation was defeated by vote in 1894, and Mineral Wells was reincorporated with G.C. Green as the first elected mayor. This picture was the style of souvenir photograph which local photographer J. C. McClure, first owner of the donkeys, took on an East Mountain path frequented by visitors. Mr. McClure was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife later owned the photography studio and the donkeys. They later built a log cabin as a scenic backdrop at a photograph stop where the donkey trail crossed a footpath up West Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24996/
[The Carlsbad Well Building]
The caption of this 1909 photograph that occurs on page 63 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, notes "...the stained glass windows had not been installed as yet and the "Ben Hur" street car tracks were still running in front of the building." (The Mineral Wells Scenic Railway--the Ben Hur Line to Lake Pinto--ceased operation in 1909, but rails were removed later, probably in conjunction with paving City Streets in 1914.) One of the earlier drinking pavilions, The Carlsbad was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the Crazy Water drinking pavilion. The Crazy Flats Rooming house--which replaced the Crazy Drinking Pavilion--along with the First Crazy Hotel complex--burned in 1925, and were replaced by the current Crazy Hotel, covering the entire block. The hotel opened in 1927. The Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel in the 1930's, and it was used as a laundry. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38083/
[West Ward School]
This photograph appears to have been given to A. W. Weaver with the following information on the back of it: "Wasn't it Whittier who said 'Still stately stands the old school house, beside the babbling brook'?--well this one no longer stands. It was a firm & strong old building when they tore it down 4 years ago. I thought you would cherish this picture as a fond recollection of yours, mine & Hugh's school days & days of happy childhood, where, as we romped & played barefoot in the soft sands & green grass, we were not as yet familiar with the hidden stones & thorns that one encounters down the highway of life. "All the sheet metal contained in the top of this building including the tin roof was made & fabricated by Papa in Grandpa's store. The metal work consists of the ornamental cornice fittings, the steeples at each corner of the building, metal banisters on the roof top, pinnacles around cupolas, flag pole with large metal ball on top & all drain piping and roof ventilators. "The barren oak trees in the yard are very familiar. Far to the right, not shown in the picture were several mesquite trees, whose limbs were platted & tied in knots when they were saplings, by Grandpa Caylor. The trees grew in the fantastic shapes. All school boys were mystified at the strange shape of the trees and Grandpa was amused." The school was located at 205 NW 5th Ave. It is both interesting and amazing how much of our history is not evident in the pictures that preserve such a vital part of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20214/
[The West Ward School]
The West Ward School is shown with "Dinky Car" tracks in foreground. The picture was taken around 1909. The first Mineral Wells School with a graduating class, built in 1902, it was located just north of Little Rock School on NW 5th Avenue. Mineral Wells' first High School graduation class, consisted of four students in 1903, as evinced by a photograph in "Time Was...", page 189. It was later named "Houston School" in 1915. The West Ward School was subsequently torn down. Another school, constructed on SW 4th Avenue, was then named "Houston School." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20246/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (2 of 2)]
This aerial photograph is adjacent to, and south of, the previous photograph. It is taken from South Mountain, looking east-south-east. The Chautauqua is on the upper left of the picture. The Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (which burned March 15, 1925) is below and to the right of the Chautauqua. The area in foreground is a residential area of west Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16249/
[A Crowd at a Race]
A note on the back of the picture identifies this scene as being at Elmhurst Park. The rails on either side indicate that this is a photograph of a race track. There is a chalk circle in the middle of the track, and a companion picture shows this circle being used for shot-put/discus competition. The spectator in the left foreground is leaning into the track to get a better look at a runner approaching the finish line at the far end of the track. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20329/
[Farmer's Market at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph, printed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS IN Mineral Wells..." on page 88, illustrates a display of fruit jars at the Mineral Wells Fair, held at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park. Canned fruits and vegetables were customarily entered in Palo Pinto County's annual fall harvest fair. Elmhurst Park hosted the fair, among other popular events during its heyday. The popularity of personal automobile transportation about 1913 made transit by street car unprofitable, and the park closed shortly after the street cars were discontinued. The City of Mineral Wells' water treatment facilities are now located in the southwest part of town, on the former Elmhurst Park property. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29833/
[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]
Mineral Wells' first Police Department is shown on horseback here. On the far left is Jim Barrett, Chief, and in the middle is Paul Granbury. The man on the right remains unknown. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", page 153. The picture appears to have been taken at the photographer's souvenir picture stand on the donkey trail about halfway up East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys for the trail; but he was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife took over the photographer's stand. They built a rock house, here as a background, for souvenir pictures. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25000/
[Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Dalton]
"Mr. & Mrs. R.S. Dalton on their 50th Wedding Anniversary as held in the second wooden structure of the First Baptist Church. Presiding is The Reverend Mr. Harlan Matthews." Robert (Bob) Dalton's father, Marcus L. Dalton, was killed by Indians on the Ft. Worth-Ft. Belknap military road in northeastern Palo Pinto County in 1870. Bob Dalton discovered the Dalton Oil Field on his ranch in north central Palo Pinto County, and the boom town that sprang up there was named Dalton City after him. He later moved to southwest Mineral Wells before building a large home, adorned with native rock, on 2101 NW 4th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29453/
[Pole Vaulting at Elmhurst Park]
Information on the back of the photograph states: "Games (pole vaulting) at Elmhurst Park two miles southwest of Mineral Wells where [the] sewage treatment plant is now located. Picture taken around 1910." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20312/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain, looking down on Mineral Wells and taken about 1910, includes: The First United Methodist Church, the Yeager Building, and the train depot in the background. This photograph was taken before the Baker Hotel was built. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16219/
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells and South Mountain, taken from atop East Mountain is shown here. Notable buildings are the West Ward School next to the "Little Rock" school house in upper right and Poston Dry Goods in left-center. The photograph was taken before the second high school was built in 1914. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16229/
[The "Doodle Bug" Interior]
This photograph illustrates the interior of a McKeen motor car, known locally as a "Doodle Bug", with its dust-proof round windows. This one, owned by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, was an 81-passenger, 70-foot-long, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, motor coach. It traveled from Graford through Oran and Salesville to Mineral Wells, thence on to Dallas. It made a round trip daily from 1912 to 1929. There was a turntable at Graford to turn the coach around. There were two "Doodle Bugs" on the WMW&NW. The third similar coach, owned by the Gulf, Texas and Western Railroad (GT&W), traveled from Seymour through Guthrie, and Jacksboro to Salesville beginning in 1913. It proceeded thence over the WMW&NW track to Mineral Wells, and on to Dallas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20357/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]
The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men in two of the trees to the right of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39214/
[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]
Mineral Wells had an early horse-drawn fire wagon, pulled by two white horses (named Joe and Frank) and driven by a man named Cogdell. This picture is included on page 189 of the Second Edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", by A. F. Weaver. The city's first fire station was located at 202 N. Oak Avenue, but the horses had difficulty responding to emergency calls from this fire station because the fire wagon's wheels tended to get trapped in the street car tracks that ran down the center of Oak Avenue, which was not paved at that time. This fire was in the central business district (note the roofs of two multistory buildings, visible at the upper left edge of the picture.) Fire hoses laid along the street are being used by two men in the left middle background to furnish water to fight the fire. The location of this particular fire is not specified, but is probably the Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas.) Mineral Wells has experienced several disastrous fires in the past; one in 1914, two blocks west of the Delaware' location, destroyed six city blocks. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38080/
[A View From South Mountain Toward East Mountain]
A view from South Mountain, toward East Mountain, before the Baker Hotel was built in the 1929 is shown here. The Old Post Office building, built in 1912, is in the upper left quadrant. This picture is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975", and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20382/
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office
Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20419/
[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]
This picture shows the First Crazy Hotel Lobby in 1913. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections; the first section, which contained this lobby, was built in 1912. The second section was added in 1914, and joined to the first with the two sections sharing this same sky-lighted lobby. A fire on March 15, 1925 destroyed the first Crazy Hotel along with all the other businesses in this block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering the entire city block, opened in 1927. It is now [2008] a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29443/
[Ladies with parasols]
"Sllew La Renim" (a social club) was "Mineral Wells" spelled backwards. Its members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913. Identified in the photograph are: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers. Note the Mineral Wells Sanitarium in the left background. This photograph may be found on page 118 of "TIME WAS...", First Edition by A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16273/
[Sllew La Renim]
The caption on page 118 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" (first edition, 1974) by A. F. Weaver, states: "The "SLLEW La RENIM Club was 'Mineral Wells' spelled backwards. The members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers." The ladies of the time used parasols to shade themselves from the sun. (There are seven ladies in the picture, but only six are identified. As deduced from the notes on the back of the picture, Mary Lee Hayes is believed to be the third lady in line in the picture.) The Mineral Wells Sanitarium, originally known as The Exchange Hotel, is shown in the upper left of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38074/
[The Crazy Flats and First Crazy Hotel]
A view of early Mineral Wells from East Mountain shows the Crazy Flats in the foreground, and the first Crazy Hotel at the left, at the rear of it. The small building at the right, rear of the Crazy Flats housed the "Crazy Woman's Well" that contributed the generic "Crazy Water" name to the local mineral water. Crazy Flats, the second Crazy Drinking Pavilion with "Rooms for Rent" on the second floor, was built in 1909. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections: The first section, at the left rear of Crazy Flats, was built in 1912, and the second section, left of it, was built in 1914, and joined to the first with a common lobby. The low building to the left of Crazy Flats and in front of the Hotel was the Crazy Bath House and Drugstore. A fire started in the drugstore March 15, 1925, and destroyed the entire city block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering this entire city block, opened in 1927. The original Crazy Well is now situated in the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Hotel with a cover over it. The second Crazy Hotel is now [2008] a Retirement Home. It was forcibly closed down in 2010. Also visible in the picture above the "Crazy" Complex and below the gap between West Mountain and South Mountain are the "Old High School", the "Little Rock School" and the Fourth Ward School. Four blocks behind and above the Hotel in the picture, the domed First Presbyterian Church is visible midway between the "Crazy Block" and the schools. The Roman Catholic church with its white steeple is at the far upper right, and the second Carlsbad Pavilion is across First Avenue, directly to the west (right rear) of the Crazy Flats. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29442/
[Two Women in Wylie Park]
Two women are pictured strolling in Wylie Park. Notes on back of the photograph read: "Corner of N. Oak and N.E. 1st Street, the West side of Wylie Park, a popular place for strolling." N. Oak Avenue is in background, with North to the right in the picture. Hazelwood Drugs is on the west side of Oak Ave, opposite the park. Mineral Wells. The streets of Mineral Wells were paved in the summer of 1914. A wagon can be seen traveling north on Oak Avenue. What appears to be a work crew may be seen at the corner indicates that the finishing touches may have been in the process of being applied to the paving as the picture was taken. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20441/
[A View from West Mountain, about 1912]
This photograph was taken after the Chautauqua was demolished (that is, about 1912). The foundation can be seen in the upper right quadrant. The Post Office, completed in 1913, is visible to the right of the Chautauqua ruins. The old viewing tower on the top of the hill, destroyed by a tornado in 1930, is just barely visible in the trees on top of the hill. The first Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats drinking pavilion, which burned in 1925, are seen one block northwest of the Post Office. The Murphy home is on top of the hill in the middle of the photograph. The Hexagon Hotel (torn down in 1959) is just above and left of the center. The Vichy Well is just to the right of the Hexagon House, and is now the location of the North Oak Community Center. In the the next block north (left) of the Hexagon House, facing west, is the Fairfield Inn with a ground-level entrance on each floor. Note the city's water tower at left center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20256/
[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]
An early scene of Mesquite Street (now [2008] NE 1st Avenue) looking North toward old U.S. Post Office from the corner of East Hubbard Street. Electrical lines are present as are cars and trucks typical of the post-1914 era, when the streets of Mineral Wells were paved. The cornerstone for the Post Office was laid in May, 1912. The building on the near right housed Campbell's Bargain store. It occupied the site of the current Baker Hotel (Opened in 1929.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16286/
[The Carlsbad Well: Second Building]
Shown here is a picture of the second Carlsbad Well building, as it appeared around 1915. The stained glass windows are shown installed, and the "Ben Hur" street car tracks have been removed. This picture appears in Weaver, A. F., "TIME WAS ...", 1st Edition, on page 63. The original Carlsbad Pavilion was on the northeast corner of NW 1st Avenue and NW 6th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway provided a gasoline-powered motor car, a "Dinky Car", which provided service every 1/4 hour to Lake Pinto from 1903 to 1909. The "Ben Hur" was the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars" whose tracks, on NW 1st Street, passed the Carlsbad pavilion and turned west on NW 6th Street. The building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for the Crazy Laundry and Dry Cleaning after the drinking pavilion was closed in the 1930's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24967/
[Downtown Mineral Wells, Texas : January 11, 1919]
Downtown Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here, as taken on January 11, 1919. The first Crazy Hotel is the prominent building in the right middle portion of the picture. The first Roman Catholic Church can be seen on the side of West Mountain in the upper middle of the picture and the old High School, the "Little Rock School", and the West Ward School are at the base of West Mountain in the far upper left part of the picture. The Dr. A.W. Thompson home is at the foot of East Mountain in the lower middle foreground of the picture. The wide street in the left middle of the picture is NW 2nd Street, looking west. The First Presbyterian Church is the domed building on the right of 2nd Street at NW 4th Avenue, near the far end of NW 2nd Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29459/
[A View of Mineral Wells]
A panoramic view of Mineral Wells, possibly taken from East Mountain. This picture was sent to A.F. Weaver, in 1975, from Charles Windell Simonds of Norman, Oklahoma, with a note indicating they were taken by his father (Clarence Winfield Simonds) on January 11,1919. The view appears to be from East Mountain looking southwest. A power plant is visible in the right center of this picture, but other landmarks have not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29458/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
A panoramic view of Mineral Wells looking southwest from East Mountain, Poston's Dry Goods store may be seen in the middle left of the picture, and the Old High School, Rock Schoolhouse, and West Ward School are visible next to West Mountain skyline in the upper right corner of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20305/
[The First Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats]
A view of the Crazy Flats and first Crazy Hotel, as seen from East Mountain. Crazy Flats, at the right middle of the picture, was the second Crazy Drinking Pavilion--also with Rooms for Rent--was built in 1909. One feature of the Flats was "Peacock Alley", where the men gathered on Sundays to watch the ladies parade and show off the latest fashions in female gear. The first Crazy Hotel is to the left rear of the Flats; the first section of the Hotel, on the right, was built in 1912, and the second section, on the left, to its left, was built in 1914 and connected to the first with a common lobby. The Crazy Bath house adjoined Crazy Flats on the left, and a drugstore was located in the left corner of the Bath house building. A fire, starting in the drugstore on March 15, 1925, burned the entire block, sparing only the small building housing the first Crazy Pavilion (the right rear of the Flats.) The current (second) Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and replaced all of the former businesses in this block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29449/
[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]
The gazebo-like structure shown in the picture protects a water pump in front of the Milling Sanitarium. The sanitarium was built about 1929 on what was then the 2500 block of SE Sixth Avenue. It later became the Irvine Sanitarium. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (Post 2399) occupies the building as of 2010. The fate of the structure shown here is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60948/
[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]
Please note the men in golf attire standing on bank, one of whom is holding a bag of golf clubs. Knee-length knickers with decorated socks were typical golf wear in the Roaring Twenties. Others are lounging around on the bank between club house and lake on a typical lazy Sunday afternoon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16269/
Two Men at Inspiration Point
Two men are here seen sitting on a bench at Inspiration Point. The photograph is believed to have been taken about the year 1920. The bluffs above the Brazos River are visible in the background. The man at the far left has been identified as Bealer Beard, at one time an owner of a construction company in Mineral wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16226/
[A View of Mineral Wells From South Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells, looking north from South Mountain, taken after 1929, is pictured here. The front of the old Mineral Wells High School is visible in the lower left corner. The Crazy Hotel is just to the right of center. This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the remark "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20384/
[The First Mineral Wells Golf Country Club]
The first clubhouse of The Mineral Wells Golf and Country Club is shown here. This picture comes from Knights of Pythias Album, 1925. The swimming area and lifeguard station can be seen at the far left of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20348/
[Excavation for the Baker]
Excavation work and clearing of the two blocks in downtown Mineral Wells for the Baker Hotel is shown here. In the background is the Dr. Thompson home, the old First Methodist church and parsonage. The parsonage was moved to the corner of SE 3rd Street & SE 5th Avenue. The filling station in the foreground was located where Murray's Grill parking lot once was [ca. 1950]. The Piedmont Hotel was across the street (NE 1st Avenue.) where the Baker Hotel garage building is now [2009]located. The work has just begun clearing the lots. The tower on top of East Mountain is barely visible above the welcome sign that was erected there in 1925. This photograph comes from the Young collection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39166/
[D. W. Griffith]
D. W. Griffith is shown standing on the roof of the new Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927 and replaced the First Crazy Hotel which had burned in 1925. Mr. Griffith, who produced silent movies including the "Keystone Kops" comedies, and the classic film "Birth of a Nation", was a guest at the Crazy Hotel while visiting Mineral Wells in 1929. A commemorative postage stamp was issued in his honor on May 27, 1975. Mr. Griffith was impressed by the "WELCOME" sign on East Mountain (the world's largest non-commercial, electrically-lighted sign at the time). He developed the "HOLLYWOOD HILLS" addition with other partners when he returned to California, and he erected what is probably the most recognizable landmark in America: The HOLLYWOOD sign in Los Angeles. Both signs have survived similar difficult times in their histories. This picture appears on page 19 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38073/
[Crazy Crystals]
Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29969/
[Crazy Fiz]
Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29971/
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