You limited your search to:

  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
 Decade: 1920-1929
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]

[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]

Date: 1920?
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: A panoramic view of Mineral Wells looking southwest from East Mountain, Poston's Dry Goods store may be seen in the middle left of the picture, and the Old High School, Rock Schoolhouse, and West Ward School are visible next to West Mountain skyline in the upper right corner of the picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Crazy Well Water Company

The Crazy Well Water Company

Date: 1920?
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. The recto folio describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The First Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats]

[The First Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats]

Date: 1920?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of the Crazy Flats and first Crazy Hotel, as seen from East Mountain. Crazy Flats, at the right middle of the picture, was the second Crazy Drinking Pavilion--also with Rooms for Rent--was built in 1909. One feature of the Flats was "Peacock Alley", where the men gathered on Sundays to watch the ladies parade and show off the latest fashions in female gear. The first Crazy Hotel is to the left rear of the Flats; the first section of the Hotel, on the right, was built in 1912, and the second section, on the left, to its left, was built in 1914 and connected to the first with a common lobby. The Crazy Bath house adjoined Crazy Flats on the left, and a drugstore was located in the left corner of the Bath house building. A fire, starting in the drugstore on March 15, 1925, burned the entire block, sparing only the small building housing the first Crazy Pavilion (the right rear of the Flats.) The current (second) Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and replaced all of the former businesses in this block.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
In The Good Old Days

In The Good Old Days

Date: 1920
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture is accompanied by a newspaper article that chronicles the activities of a group of men repairing the public highway between Mineral Wells and Palo Pinto in the year 1920--before the Texas Highway Department was created. Pictured are the following people: Harold Guinn on left with spade. J. L. Miller on truck fender. Standing, left to right: Red Taylor, George Oliver, Johnnie Liveley; Irl Preston and W. T. Tygrett shaking hands, with Joe Dillon standing between them. Also standing in the background are Clarence Wewerkka, W. C. Caldwell, W. I. Smith, and Lawrence Davis. The photograph is listed as courtesy of W. T. Tygrett.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]

[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]

Date: 1920?/1929?
Creator: unknown
Description: The gazebo-like structure shown in the picture protects a water pump in front of the Milling Sanitarium. The sanitarium was built about 1929 on what was then the 2500 block of SE Sixth Avenue. It later became the Irvine Sanitarium. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (Post 2399) occupies the building as of 2010. The fate of the structure shown here is unknown.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]

[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]

Date: 1920?/1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: Please note the men in golf attire standing on bank, one of whom is holding a bag of golf clubs. Knee-length knickers with decorated socks were typical golf wear in the Roaring Twenties. Others are lounging around on the bank between club house and lake on a typical lazy Sunday afternoon.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The New Suspension Bridge at Lover's Retreat, Near Mineral Wells, Texas

The New Suspension Bridge at Lover's Retreat, Near Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1920?
Creator: unknown
Description: A suspension bridge for pedestrian traffic across Eagle Creek at Lover's Retreat is shown here, from what must be a picture post-card. Formerly a public park, and now on private property, it was located four miles west of Palo Pinto on the old Bankhead Highway (now U.S. Highway 180).
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Two  Men at Inspiration Point

Two Men at Inspiration Point

Date: 1920?
Creator: unknown
Description: Two men are here seen sitting on a bench at Inspiration Point. The photograph is believed to have been taken about the year 1920. The bluffs above the Brazos River are visible in the background. The man at the far left has been identified as Bealer Beard, at one time an owner of a construction company in Mineral wells.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View of Mineral Wells From South Mountain]

[A View of Mineral Wells From South Mountain]

Date: 1920?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of Mineral Wells, looking north from South Mountain, taken after 1929, is pictured here. The front of the old Mineral Wells High School is visible in the lower left corner. The Crazy Hotel is just to the right of center. This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the remark "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1920?/1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a picture that was found in Mr. Weaver's collection, and captioned "We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas." This type of advertising was used by most of the drinking pavilions in this popular health resort to tout the beneficial effects of Mineral Wells' waters. There were numerous testimonials attesting the truth of such claims. When the Food and Drug Administration began to enforce the nation's drug laws vigorously in the mid- 1930's, however, there were no rigorous scientific test data to document such claims or to warn of possible side effects that taking the mineral water might bring about. Consequently, this sort of advertising was banned after the 1930's.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 NEXT LAST