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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1910-1919
 [The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]

[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]

Date: 1911
Creator: unknown
Description: The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men in two of the trees to the right of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

Date: 1912?
Creator: unknown
Description: Mineral Wells had an early horse-drawn fire wagon, pulled by two white horses (named Joe and Frank) and driven by a man named Cogdell. This picture is included on page 189 of the Second Edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", by A. F. Weaver. The city's first fire station was located at 202 N. Oak Avenue, but the horses had difficulty responding to emergency calls from this fire station because the fire wagon's wheels tended to get trapped in the street car tracks that ran down the center of Oak Avenue, which was not paved at that time. This fire was in the central business district (note the roofs of two multistory buildings, visible at the upper left edge of the picture.) Fire hoses laid along the street are being used by two men in the left middle background to furnish water to fight the fire. The location of this particular fire is not specified, but is probably the Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas.) Mineral Wells has experienced several disastrous fires in the past; one in 1914, two blocks west of the Delaware' location, destroyed six city blocks.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Mesquite Street, Looking South]

[Mesquite Street, Looking South]

Date: 1912?
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a view of Mesquite Street (Now--2008--NE First Avenue) from its upper end at Coke Street (now NE 2nd Street). Horse-drawn vehicles are present. The building at the left middle of the picture with the "DRUGS" sign and the stone lion statue on its roof is the Yeager Building, home of what was popularly called "The Lion Drug Store." The first building on right, 205 NE First Street (with arched windows) was H. M. Coleman's clothing store for men, which even at this early date, appears to be undergoing renovation.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Our City

Our City

Date: 1912?/1915
Creator: unknown
Description: A photograph, taken from Welcome Mountain looking West down NW 4th Street, of unknown date is illustrated here. The small brick building in 4th Street is the Crazy Well. The first Crazy Water Hotel (left middle of picture) was built on same location as present Crazy Water hotel. The present hotel is much larger and extends to the Crazy Well. Note the Crazy Flats (drinking pavilion with apartments) in foreground. Note the first Catholic Church, on West Mountain. The West Ward School and the High School are in upper left quadrant of picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View From South Mountain Toward East Mountain]

[A View From South Mountain Toward East Mountain]

Date: 1912?/1929?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view from South Mountain, toward East Mountain, before the Baker Hotel was built in the 1929 is shown here. The Old Post Office building, built in 1912, is in the upper left quadrant. This picture is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975", and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 [The Construction of  the Post Office]

[The Construction of the Post Office]

Date: May 3, 1912
Creator: unknown
Description: Written on front of picture is the partial holograph legend: ".ade from the North east ...ner looking Southwest made May the 3rd 1912" It shows the construction of what would eventually be the third Post Office at 201 N.E. 2nd Street. A shear-legs is shown on the extreme left. The workers have clearly stopped work for the taking of the photograph, which is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 150. The building now [2014] houses the Women's Club.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office

Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office

Date: May 13, 1912
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1913

The Burro, Yearbook of Mineral Wells High School, 1913

Date: 1913
Creator: Mineral Wells High School (Mineral Wells, Tex.)
Description: Yearbook for Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas includes photos of and information about the school, student body, teachers, and organizations.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Contributing Partner: Mineral Wells Heritage Association
Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Carlisle House was owned and managed by Mrs. A[lexander] E[mmett] Carlisle, after the death of her husband in 1911. It was one of the largest hotels of its day, boasting sixty rooms. It was destroyed in a fire on July 4, 1914. The Abilene "Reporter" of July 5, 1914 reports that fire began its course at the Tourist Hotel (located, at the time, at 315 NW 4th street). It spread to the New Hazel Hotel (at 305 NW 4th Street), took in the Harrel House, (at 301 NW 4th street), the Lake Charles, Louisiana (511 NW 2nd Street), and the Burk House, 601 NW 3rd Avenue, as well as seven houses that were not hotels. The fire was so thorough that in 1921, the area was still devoid of buildings. It was on this site that Mordecai Ham (he who converted Billy Graham) put up a tent for a revival on March 23, 1927. He accepted the position of pastor at the First Baptist Church in Oklahoma City on June 19, 1927. He remained in that position until June 16, 1929, when he returned to the revival circuit. The Carlisle House was located in the same block as the ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]

[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]

Date: 1913
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the First Crazy Hotel Lobby in 1913. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections; the first section, which contained this lobby, was built in 1912. The second section was added in 1914, and joined to the first with the two sections sharing this same sky-lighted lobby. A fire on March 15, 1925 destroyed the first Crazy Hotel along with all the other businesses in this block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering the entire city block, opened in 1927. It is now [2008] a retirement home.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library