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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells]
A women's basketball game (at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells, taken about 1910) is shown in progress here. A "Dancing Pavilion" is visible in the background. Please note the players' uniforms. This scene shows a battle for the rebound after a shot at the basket. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16315/
[The Women's Corps, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense]
The Women's Corp, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense. The photograph pictures 13 (unnamed) women, a young girl, and A. F. Weaver during a flag presentation. Mr. Weaver, a Ham Radio operator, set up the Palo Pinto County Civil Defense on October 1, 1972 and was the director for 26 years. Mr. Weaver was also the author of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", a photographic history, first published in 1975. The book was revised and published again in three subsequent editions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25059/
[The Woodmen of the World -- 1905]
Mineral Wells was a popular convention city in its heyday. This photograph is part of the group attending a convention of the Woodmen of the World in Mineral Wells. The picture was taken around 1905 at the Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25086/
[The Woodmen of the World - 1911]
The picture was taken in 1911 during the Woodmen of the World convention. It shows the backside of the Crazy Flats, before the first Crazy Hotel sections were constructed. The buildings in the background are the four wings of the Crazy Well Water Company, "The Crazy Flats," where rooms for rent were also available. The first Crazy Hotel was built the following year, 1912, on the location where this convention gathering is pictured. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25083/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention, 1911],
This is another picture of the convention of The Woodmen of the World in 1911. Note the men holding symbolic axes. This picture represents half of a photographic panorama view. It was taken at the back of Crazy Flats, the Crazy Water Company's third Drinking Pavilion, that also offered rooms for rent. The first Crazy Hotel was built on this open lot the following year. Clark's Pharmacy and The Lithia Drug Company are also pictured behind and to the left of the "Crazy Flats." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16215/
The Woodruff Cottage
Copy around this picture states that the Woodruff Cottage was built by a Civil War veteran who came to Mineral Wells for his health in 1903. His health improved so much, writes the copy, that he decided to build a fine home here with rooms for visitors. A note on the back of the picture indicates the "Cottage" was opened in 1905. The copy also states that it was located one block north of the Crazy and Carlsbad wells, and became quite popular because of its convenient location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20331/
[The Yeager Block]
This picture shows a white sandstone building on NE 1st Avenue named "Yeager Block." The original home of (what was often called) the Lion Drugstore, it once sported a metal statue of a lion mounted on the roof, which gave rise to the legend that the business was called "The Lion Drug." (Current living descendants of Dr. Yeager do not ever remember the drugstore being referred to by than name. However, a casual reference to it in 1912 refers to the store as "The Lion Drug.") It housed the Baker Medical Supply at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back of the photograph gives the year as "1993." The coffee shop "H2J0" is located [in 2007] where "The Rural Route" used to be. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20433/
[The Yeager Building]
Shown here is a stone building named "Yeager Block" on NE 1st Avenue. The building originally housed what was called, (by some) "The Lion Drug Store", and once had a metal statue of a lion on its roof. It housed the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left (south) of the photograph was named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back is given as 1993. The coffee shop H2JO was located on the north part of the building in 2006. Mike Chamberlain Photography was located on the north end of the block in 2006. It is now [2008] closed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20422/
[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]
The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20417/
[Yet Another View of Mineral Wells]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60957/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 8, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 8, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505599/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 9, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 15, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505710/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 10, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 22, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505735/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 11, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 29, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505614/
Frontal Weather
This booklet gives an overview of frontal weather as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes a "Discussion of frontal weather systems to include identification, characteristics and flight techniques to be used when penetrating a given frontal system." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46579/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505631/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 13, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505744/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 19, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505673/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505588/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 16, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505725/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 17, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505746/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 18, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 19, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505709/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 19, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505713/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 20, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 2, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505687/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 21, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 9, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505584/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 22, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 16, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505601/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 23, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505609/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 30, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505602/
Weather Depiction Chart
This booklet gives an overview of weather depiction charts as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes, it includes information on "The ceiling and visibility at specific locations and the areas of IFR and VFR weather conditions." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46567/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 25, Ed. 1 Saturday, May 2, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505612/
Mountain Circulation
This booklet gives an overview of mountain circulation as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information to "Identify mountain circulation patterns, flight hazards, and recommended flight procedures for mountainous operations." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46572/
Atmosphere and Temperature
This booklet gives an overview of atmosphere and temperature as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Pressure scale measurement, isobars, forces that affect winds, high and low pressure systems and associate weather[-]formation prevailing wind belts." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46577/
Air Masses
This booklet gives an overview of air masses as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Explanation of the classification of air masses; weather associated with particular air masses; [and the] trajectory and source region of air masses that invade the United States." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46578/
Icing
This booklet gives an overview of icing as it relates to aviation. It includes information on "Three types of icing and associated cloud formations and temperatures" as well as "Hazards and flight procedures in icing", according to the scope notes on the title page. The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46570/
The Reporter (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 6, No. 52, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 4, 1971
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth476225/
Pressure and Wind
This booklet gives an overview of pressure and wind as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Explanation of the effects of pressure in the atmosphere to include altimeter error, identity of the standard reference plane, identity of and weather connected with high and low pressure systems plus associated winds." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46576/
Winds Aloft
This booklet gives an overview of winds aloft, as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Winds aloft, modes of observation, forecasts and charts." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46574/
Moisture and Clouds
This booklet gives an overview of moisture and cloud formations as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Cloud formation, international classification, abbreviations, and symbols" as well as "General flight conditions associated with stratiform and cumuliform clouds." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46580/
Radar Summary Chart
This booklet gives an overview of radar summary charts as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Introduction to Radar Summary Charts." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on page 14. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46566/
[The Welcome Sign]
The WELCOME Sign (shown here) was built in 1922 by George Holmgren, the Texas Rotary Club's Governor,in his San Antonio iron works following the State Rotary Club's Convention in Mineral Wells. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain the world's largest non-commercial lighted sign. The original incandescent bulbs were later replaced with lower-maintenance red neon lights by the Mineral Wells Jaycees. A Warrant Officer Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from its original site on East Mountain to the east side of Bald Mountain (now called Welcome Mountain), overlooking Elmwood Cemetery, in 1972. It remains there today [2008], lighted at its base with flood lights, to greet visitors from the east. This is a picture, taken in 1972, of the restored sign. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29410/
Medical Facts for Pilots
This pamphlet gives an overview of information for pilots to maintain good health and recognize warning signs of problems they might face specific to flying. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46559/
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [], No. [], Ed. 1 Monday, October 2, 1972
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477386/
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20338/
[The Sangcura Sprudel Fire]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well drinking pavilion was originally located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. It was moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches on the building were enclosed, and it was converted to a rooming house. It burned December 5, 1973, just five minutes before the start of the Mineral Wells Christmas Parade. The remaining part of the Period Hotel on N.W. 4th Avenue, which also burned at another date, was converted into apartments that can be seen through the smoke in the upper left of the picture. This photograph is found on page 64 of A.F Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells,"' First Edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20304/
[The Austin Well]
This photograph shows the Austin Well as it was in 1974. A legend on the back of photograph reads: "Looking south shows remains of Austin Well in the foreground with the remains of what used to be the crystal plant. Across the street may be seen the St Regis box plant." The former Crazy Water Crystal plant, at the left edge of the picture, is now the St. Regis box factory This well is associated with a unique and romantic history: A cowboy rode a blind mare into Mineral Wells and auctioned her off for a dollar and a half. Mr. Austin acquired the horse, and put her to work drawing water from the well by turning a wheel to which was attached a rope, which with each revolution of the wheel, pulled a bucket of water from the well to ground level. Nellie was trained to pause at a point in her circular route long enough for the bucket to be emptied, then continue on to pull up the next bucket when it was filled. Blind Nellie was retired in her old age, but continued to walk a similar circular route in the pasture to which she was retired, pausing in each revolution, as before, until her death. Texas Packaging Company, Incorporated, has occupied the box plant since 1980. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29822/
[The Crazy Hotel Barber Shop]
This photograph shows the barber Shop in the Crazy Hotel in 1974. "Shoe Shine Boy" Leon Cross is shown seated at his shoe-shine stand. Leon worked in the First Crazy Hotel before it burned in 1925, and (in 1974) he had been employed by the hotel in various capacities since. The new Crazy Hotel opened in 1927. After the Nazareth Hospital closed, rooms on the first two floors of the Crazy were used as a hospital while the new Palo Pinto General Hospital was under construction. The Crazy Hotel is now [2009]a retirement Home. It was forcibly closed down in 2010. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20426/
[The Crazy Well]
This picture was taken in 1974, looking south on NW 1st Avenue from NW 4th Street, showing the metal cover, in the sidewalk corner, of the Crazy Well. It is full of Crazy water, ready to be pumped out and used. The building on the left is the west side of the present [2008] Crazy Water Retirement Hotel. This information was taken from Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", page 29. This well was the third one dug in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20415/
[The Mineral Wells Police Force and City/County Ambulance Service]
Shown here is a picture of the Mineral Wells Police force and the City/County Ambulance Service, taken in 1974. From left to right are: Bennie Hutcheson, R.A. Hodges, Jim Elmore, Jimmy Davis, Walter Graves, Orville West, Montiford Parker, Henry Childress, Don Farriel, Larry Brandenburg, Bill Meaders, Raymond Jones, Mike Poe, Ricky Shank, Fred Foreman (Police Chief), Gene Knerr, Gilbert Sommerfield (Investigator), David Jared, and Ronnie Edwards. The information was taken from the back of photograph, which itself was taken at the West City Park. It is published on page 153 of A.F.Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29831/
[The Rock School House]
The Rock School, erected in 1884, was Mineral Wells' first public school. It was last used in 1957 as a band hall. It was leased to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association in 1974, renovated and converted to a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the City of Mineral Wells. This picture appears to have been taken at the time of its renovation and conversion, as the worker on the ladder makes evident. The bell tower has been enclosed, and window screens and doors have been painted or replaced. The property now belongs to the Fifty Year Club, but the museum is still operated by the non-profit Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25048/
[The Thompson House, at 215 NE 2nd Street]
Photograph of the front of the Thompson House (later the "Cunningham House"), a two-story, Queen Anne-style home located at 215 NE 2nd Street in Mineral Wells, Texas, just north of the Baker Hotel. Architectural elements include decorative woodwork around the eaves in the gable ends and across the front porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16175/