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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]
Illustrated here is picture of a model of the Hexagon Hotel (and the only living daughter of David Galbraith, Elizabeth Sickels) that was taken about 1977. The model is now located in the Mineral Wells Historical Association's Rock School House. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20480/
Montgomery Ward & Co.
The front of the photograph obviously reads: Montgomery Ward & Co. A hand-written legend reads: Mineral Wells, Texas Aug 24th 1929 The back reads: North Oak Ave. Built in 1929 Copyright A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39178/
Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]
A view of Moore Street (now NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16284/
Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells
This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20225/
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]
A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20473/
[The Murphy Family]
A scene of children sitting in horse-drawn carriage, with a man leaning against the carriage house is illustrated here. A family home is shown in the background, with chickens, and a cow in the foreground. Information on back of photograph states "Looking west. Back of Murphy Home on East Mountain." Murphy was a builder in Mineral Wells with the firm of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors. They built many of the buildings in the early part of the 1900's, including Mineral Wells High School (1915), Bimini Bath House, and the Norwood Hospital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20230/
[The Murphy Home]
A picture taken of the Murphy home about, taken the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The home underwent several renovations during Mr. Murphy's residency. The family at the time of this photograph consisted of two adults and three children. The home is located on East Mountain, and can be seen from most of North Oak Avenue. It was later known as the Brewer home. Mr. Murphy, a contractor, built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School and the second First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20248/
[Newspaper Special - Rotary Convention, 1922]
A special "Rotary photogravure" edition for the Rotary Club Convention, Mineral Wells, that took place in 1922. The edition carries a panoramic view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, and pictures of twenty Rotary officials and Convention Committee Chairmen. George Holmgren, District Governor (third from left), had Mineral Wells' WELCOME sign built in his San Antonio Iron Works, and donated it to the people of Mineral Wells that year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25077/
[The North Entrance to Elmhurst Park]
The entrance to Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells is shown here. The number "7830" in the upper left portion of the picture remains unexplained. The park was a recreational spot for the resort city. The park was closed in 1913, when trolley service was discontinued for lack of customers. As a direct result, the casino no longer exists, being also a casualty of the state's reform of gambling laws. It is now the site of the city sewage disposal facility. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16312/
North Front of Old School House
A north (side) view of the West Ward School, Mineral Wells' first High School. Built in 1902, located at 205 NW 5th Avenue, north of and on the same property as the old Rock School. The school served as both a High School and Elementary school until the East Ward School was built in 1906. When Mineral Wells High School was built in 1915, the West Ward name was changed to Houston Elementary School. It was torn down when a new Houston School was built in 1930. A note on the back of this photograph states "From Howard Album." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25074/
[North Oak Avenue ]
A street scene in Mineral Wells (looking north on Oak Avenue) approximately at the corner of North Oak Avenue and West Hubbard Street is shown here. Street car (running from 1907 to 1913) tracks are visible in the foreground, and the guy wires required to keep the power wire of the trolley in place festoon the sky. The Hexagon Hotel (opened in 1897)is visible towards the back of the picture. The Vichy (later the Beach, and then later the Standard)well is barely visible across from the Hexagon Hotel. The streets of Mineral Wells were not paved until 1914. Please observe the utter absence of automobiles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16308/
[North Oak Avenue Street Scene]
A street scene of North Oak Avenue, looking north from Hubbard Street, taken about 1930, includes businesses as: Palace Drug Company, Owl Book Store, American Cafe, Poston Dry Goods, Max Miller's Shoe Store, Caldwell Hotel, Texas Power and Light, Bath House and Crazy Water Hotel. Please note that the street has been paved, and a traffic light is present. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16296/
[A North Oak Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]
A trolley car, and, presuably, passengers, are shown here at the front of entrance to Elmhurst Park. Elmhurst Park was active in the early years of the twentieth century,its career being ended by about 1940. People leaning against trolley car wear what is now [2008] considered "Vintage" clothing. One set of tracks seems to be overgrown by grass; tufts of grass also appear on the other set of tracks. No explanation has been put forward to clarify this situation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20317/
North Oak U. S. O.
This building was erected during World War II as a USO. Many Hollywood stars performed there for the troops during the war. It is now [2009] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39191/
NW 6th Street-1906
A legend on the photograph announces: "NW 6th Street: 1906." It shows two children on donkeys and a horse and wagon. The view is west from Welcome Mountain (now East Mountain.) It appears that the old McCutcheon home (now [2008] the Gil Hull home) can be seen on the right at 612 NW 6th Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16283/
Oak Street, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture purports to show North Oak Avenue,(the photograph reads "Oak Street")of Mineral Wells, Texas,in the 100 block--looking north. The Mineral Wells Electric Railway operated from 1907 to 1913, and streets were paved in 1914. Visible are: A horse-drawn hack with passengers, a streetcar, automobiles, numerous people on sidewalks, and businesses along the street. The streetcar (Apparently working on air: The electric line required to power it is nowhere in sight)is passing the Poston Dry Goods store on its right. The Hexagon Hotel (opened December 1897)is possibly visible in the distance. A steeple is barely visible on the skyline at the left (west) side of the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16307/
The Oaks
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60887/
The Oaks
The Oaks, at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, burned in 1908 along with the Presbyterian Church. The church steeple can be seen at the left. A later view of the building (with concrete sidewalks) is found on page 103 of A. F. Weaver's 1974 book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20320/
[Oden's Drive Inn]
This restaurant and grocery store was once located at 3403 Highway 280 east in Mineral Wells. It is no longer [2012] in existence. The photograph shows 1940's and 1950's cars parked in front. The Odens resided above the business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39193/
The [Old] City Hall
This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39176/
[An Old Home in Mineral Wells]
An old home, located in Mineral Wells, Texas, on 404 SW 3rd Street is shown here. The Baker Hotel faintly visible in the background, looking about half-way up the lowermost branch of the tree in front of the house, and looking towards the northeast. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20269/
[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]
An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16135/
[The "Old" Post Office]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16140/
[The Old Post Office]
This picture shows what is now [2101] known as "The Old Post Office Building." A horse, dragging a cart, is seen drinking out of a trough in front of it. The trough is now [2010]located in the Mineral Wells Commons park. The whereabouts of horse is unknown. The building now [2010] houses the Women's club. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 188. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39197/
On the Broadway of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas
The title on the Picture states, "On The Broadway Of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas." This picture shows a section of the Bankhead Highway, looking east where the main road to Millsap descends from the mountain on which the Mineral Wells Airport stands. Once identified as part of US Highway 281 south of town [Mineral Wells], it overlooks much of the scenery viewed from "Observation Point",at one time called one of the most scenic vistas in the state. The Bankhead Highway was America's first transcontinental highway, starting at Mile Zero on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D. C. It terminated in San Diego, California, and was named for Senator John Hollis Bankhead, head of the Good Roads Movement. It was once labeled "The Broadway of America." The road was approved by Congress in 1916, but construction was delayed by World War I. Hundreds of miles were built in the 1920's when it crossed Palo Pinto County. Mineral Wells' main streets, Hubbard Street and SE 6th Avenue were part of the Bankhead Highway. Hollis Bankhead was the grandfather of Broadway Actress, Tallulah Bankhead. His brother ran a Drugstore in Gordon, Texas, with the proud motto: "The best is none too good for our customers." The drugstore also advertised, "Everything from the cradle to the grave", selling products ranging from baby food to coffins. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16302/
One of the Residence Streets
Pictured here is a promotional brochure. The main part of the picture is a view looking west on Moore Street (now NE 6th Street). At the left (south) side of the street, in the middle distance, is the Hexagon House Hotel that was built by David G. Galbraith, inventor of the paper clip. The hotel opened in 1897. To the immediate left is the Gibson Well and Drinking Pavilion. At the far corner of the Gibson property, in the middle of the street, appears to be the public drinking fountain shown in a companion picture--AWO_1076P--which is also included in the Weaver Collection. The fountain was apparently removed from the intersection when the "Dinky cars" began operating to Lake Pinto in 1905. The poor quality of the image is due to print screening. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16292/
The Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells
A.F. Weaver obtained this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters", now in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.). The booklet is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and is not meant to be taken seriously. See also the cartoons "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20224/
[The Opening of the New Brick Highway - 1936]
A new, brick-topped highway was opened between Mineral Wells and Weatherford in 1936. In the opening ceremony, J. Pat Corrigan is identified cutting the symbolic ribbon held by Allan Wallace and W.A. Ross. The new brick highway began at [NE?] 9th Avenue, and extended along East Hubbard Street. Brick paving the 21-mile stretch of road was laid entirely by hand by two black men whose names, however, were never preserved for posterity. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25095/
The Original Baptist Church Building at SW 4th Avenue
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60897/
The Oxford Hotel
The Hubbard Street Trolley car is shown at Oak and Hubbard Streets on its way west to Pinto Lake, next to the Oxford Hotel. The First State Bank and Trust was located in the northwest (near) corner of the hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16272/
Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex[as]
Shown here is a photograph titled "Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex." It shows the completed building of the Oxford Hotel, and First State Bank and Trust Company, located at Oak and Hubbard. Note the period automobile. Written under the picture is: "I was just getting along alright [sic] write and let me know [lacuna?] you all are getting along. Will go to Wichita Falls next wk" [Signature illegible] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16208/
Pal-Pinto-Crystal Wells Bath House
The Pal-Pinto Crystal Wells Bath House is illustrated here, although its location is unknown. Thelma Doss wrote in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" that, "It was a long, rambling structure with a large number of rooms for bathing purposes for both ladies and gentleman. There was a grand selection of baths such as Plain, Turkish, Salt Glow, Russian Massage, and Vapor baths. This large rambling structure looked more like a house for a large family than a business." This picture occurs on page 65 of A. F. Weaver's book in both First and Second Editions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20335/
[The Palo Pinto County Courthouse]
This picture illustrates Palo Pinto County's third Courthouse, completed in 1941 by the WPA. The rock retaining wall was constructed out of materials taken from the second (1884) courthouse. A World War II Memorial stands in the foreground of the picture, and a granite marker at the far right commemorates the county's 1957 Centennial. Native pecan, elm and oak trees surround the county seat. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25098/
[The Palo Pinto County Fair Parade of 1912]
The Palo Pinto County Fair Parade of 1912 is shown, with a horse-drawn float, more horses, an automobile and people in parade. The "Queens Float" featured Queen Apolline Dow of Oran. The outriders were Ferdinand Dow, Ernest Clark, John T. Bowman. Maids of Honor were Alma Herndon, Carrie Stephenson, Ruby Johnson, Mae Belle Smith, Nina Mae Haynes and Cleo Frost. The parade is shown moving south in the 200 block of North Oak Street. (Please note the tracks of the trolley system, which operated from 1907 to 1913.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16300/
[A Panoramic View of Mineral Wells]
The southern half of a two-part panoramic view of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas, taken about 1910 occupies this photograph. In this view, the Crazy Flats drinking pavilion is seen at the upper left;First Methodist Church near the skyline to the right of the Crazy Flats; and the First Presbyterian Church (domed building) at the upper far right of the picture. The houses shown are predominantly in the Queen Anne style--a popular one at the time of the photograph. This picture occurs on page 133 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", first edition, 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20330/
[A Panoramic View of South Mountain From East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain to South Mountain is shown here. At the mid-right of the picture is the gap between South Mountain and West Mountain where U.S. Highway 180 is now located. Just below the gap is the West Ward School House ( Mineral Wells first High School), built in 1902. The Little Rock School House to the left (south) of the West Ward School, built in 1884, Mineral Wells' First public school, is now a museum. The two spires of the First Baptist Church can be seen near the center of the picture. This photograph was taken prior to 1914, at which time a new High School was built south of the Rock School. The photograph's poor quality may be ascribed to the print source. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16224/
[Parade at Highways 180 and 281 in Mineral Wells]
The bi-centennial parade, 1976 is shown here in progress. A covered wagon, horses, riders, and parade float are visible in the background. The view is taken from the corner of westbound Hubbard Street, (US Highway 180) at Oak Avenue, (US Highway 281.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16145/
[A Parade in 1925]
A military contingent of the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade is proceeding west in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street. Please note the Mineral Wells Sanatorium in the upper right of the photograph just east of the old Post Office. Please note also the double line of angle-parked automobiles on the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16298/
[A Parade in 1925]
A parade took placed during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce's convention of 1925. The parade is moving west on NE 2nd Street. The Whatley-Maddox Ford-Lincoln Motor Company (festooned with bunting)is shown on the corner with the U.S. Post Office across the street. East of the Post Office is the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16230/
[A Parade in Mineral Wells on North Oak Avenue]
The Chamber of Commerce float, with the Parade Princess, greets visitors in the 1936 Centennial Parade in Mineral Wells,Texas. It is shown proceeding along the 200 block of North Oak Avenue. Businesses in photograph include, (bunting-festooned)Perry Brothers 5- 10- and 25-cent store, City Bakery, and (to the left) part of Duke & Ayers 5- & 10-cent store. Angle-parked automobiles and spectators line the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16257/
[A Parade of Automobiles]
A parade of decorated automobiles is shown crossing the intersection at North Oak and NE 2nd Streets,as seen from the west. A sign for Lovera Cigars is visible on the front of the Crazy Drug Company (the gray building at right middle of the picture.) The large white building in the left center back-ground is the Presbyterian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16263/
[A Parade With a Rotary Club float]
The Rotary Club float in Mineral Wells' 1976 Bi-Centennial Parade featured riders, in clothes typifying the period, that represent a "Roaring Twenties" golfer dancing with "Flapper Fannies." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16141/
[A Park Gathering]
Three unknown men and seven unknown women gather in a park in front of the Gibson Well Drinking Pavilion in the early part of the twentieth century--presumably by the appearance of their clothes. Please observe the parasol that the lady on the right front is holding. The pavilion was located in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, a site now occupied by the First Christian Church. The exact date of the photograph is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20457/
[A party at the Wann home]
A photograph of a news article describing a party given by Mrs. Chloe Schillings at her home, located on NW 2nd Street and 4th Avenue--across the street and west of the Presbyterian Church. The party included Mrs. M. R. Birdwell, Mrs. S. A. Prostridge, Mrs. B. R. Beeler, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. Elizabeth Cushman, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Mrs. Gus Wicklund, Mrs. Millie Turner, Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. Mae B. Tiliord, Mrs. E. W. Rogers, Mrs, Vera Lang, Mrs. Ed Oliver, Mrs. F. C. Highsmith and Mrs. Chloe Wann Schillings At the time of the news article, the home, a large Queen Anne-style house, was said to be owned by Mrs. S. H. Smith. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16185/
Pasadena Heights
A July, 1906 plat of "Pasadena Heights, the Home Builders Addition to Mineral Wells, Texas." Developers of the addition were D. M. Howard, (Co-owner of Mineral Wells' first big department store, Howard Brothers), B. R. Strong, and Frank Richards (manager of the Star Well and owner of an early mineral water crystal plant). Street names were changed in 1912. This area came to be facetiously called "Jackass Flats" by locals. The Brazos Mall is currently [2008] located at the bottom of the plat, Wal-Mart, to the east of the plat. Elmwood Cemetery is at the southwest edge of the plat. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20282/
Paving Brick Plant
Shown here is a photograph of the Paving Brick Plant. In the lower right-hand corner is the legend: Young Studio Mineral Wells, Tex." It was established in 1921; electrified in 1925-1926; the company was sold in 1927, re-named "Reliance Brick Company." It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 162. Electrification was accomplished when the Texas Power and Light Company furnished an abandoned 500 h.p. stream-power plant for the job. It was fed natural gas by means of the Upham Gas Company's line. In 1927, the plant was the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi River, confining its production exclusively to vitrified shale material. The manager in 1927 has been identified as A. E. Eaton, who was also instrumental in locating the plant in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39179/
[Paving East Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells]
A group of men work on paving East Hubbard street in Mineral Wells. Electrical lines are present. Street paving in Mineral Wells began in 1914. On the right is the Richards House. Behind the house is Lamar Flats water pavilion, now [2008]the site of the Baker Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16288/
[Penitentiary Hollow]
A photograph of a woman and young boy at Penitentiary Hollow in Lake Mineral Wells State Park. A dam across Rock Creek east of Mineral Wells in Parker County was built to impound a new water supply for the city of Mineral Wells. A joint committee of nine named the new water source Lake Mineral Wells in December 1919. When it became necessary to dam up Palo Pinto Creek in the 1960's to obtain a larger source of water, the city gave Lake Mineral Wells to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission for a State Park. Penitentiary Hollow in the State Park is one of the few areas in Texas where rock climbers may gain mountain-climbing experience. As the photograph shows, spectacular vertical cliffs, 40 feet and more in height, are well-adapted to honing climbing skills. The area gets its name from the story that cattle thieves were thought to cache their booty there, preparatory to driving the hapless animals onward for sale. Anyone detected in the area was therefore likely to find lodging in a local penitentiary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25094/
[Penitentiary Hollow]
Three ladies (bearing bouquets), a man and a boy perch among the angular boulders of Penitentiary Hollow on the east side of Lake Mineral Wells. Their identities are unknown. This picture is probably a souvenir photograph, taken at some time during the late 1910's or early 1920's. A local story has it that the area gets its name from the "Fact" that cattle thieves were said to be accustomed to cache their booty here, in preparation to driving it on farther for sale. Therefore, anybody detected in this place (who could no give a good account of himself) was likely to find lodging in the nearest penitentiary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39231/
[The Penix Home ]
The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16161/