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[A Street Scene: Highways 281 and 180]
A picture, looking north on US Highway 281 from NW 1st Street to its intersection with US highway 180 (Hubbard Street). The first building on the right is Lynch Plaza, the location of the discovery of the mineral water well that gave Mineral Wells its name and made it the leading health spa in the state. Other businesses are: Cole's Florist on the west (left) corner of the block opposite Lynch Plaza, Poston's Dry goods (the low building in middle of block north of Cole's), First State Bank on the corner north of Lynch Plaza. The Crazy Hotel can be seen in the distance; three blocks up the street on the left. Oak Street was widened, with turn lanes, in 2005. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20432/
[The Baker Hotel Roof Garden]
This photograph is identified as "Baker Hotel Roof Garden February 1999." Two chandeliers are still in place on the ceiling, but the missing floor boards, the peeling paint, and the deserted condition of the room are indicative of the sad condition of a once beautiful ballroom. A ballroom on the twelfth floor was titled "The Cloud Room" by virtue of the clouds painted on its ceiling. A picture of it has yet [2014] to be found. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39163/
[A Panorama of Mineral Wells, Texas: Looking East]
Shown here is Mineral Wells, Texas looking east. This photograph was taken from Northwest Mountain, by A.F. Weaver on September 5, 1997. The Baker Hotel is in the center of the picture, with the Second Crazy Water Hotel in front of and left of the Baker; and the Nazareth Hospital, to the left of the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20346/
Baker Hotel Swimming Pool
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39156/
[The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, Northwestern Railroad Depot]
The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, and Northwestern (WMW&NW) Railroad began operations October 1,1891. The Texas & Pacific Railway bought out the WMW&NW in 1902, and shortly thereafter built this depot to replace a former wooden structure that had been destroyed by fire. The rail line had a colorful history, operating through World War II and into the 1990's. Construction of an extension of the line to the city of Oran was completed in 1907, and on to Graford the following January. In 1912 two McKeen motor coaches (called "Doodlebugs" by the locals)were added. These were self-contained, 200 Horsepower, 70-foot long, gasoline-powered, 80-passenger coaches which provided service between Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Fort Worth and Dallas. A round trip took less than six hours, and two "Doodlebugs" provided service in each direction every three hours. In 1913, the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad, building south from Seymour, Texas, began operations over the WMW&NW line from Salesville to Mineral Wells, thus connecting the cities of Seymour, Olney, Jacksboro, Graford, Oran, Salesville, Mineral Wells, and Weatherford with daily round-trip service to Dallas. In 1928, passenger traffic had declined to a point that passenger service was discontinued, and did not resume until the nation began mobilizing for World War II in 1940. Nearly a half million troops (429,966) passed through the depot during the war years in transit to and from Ft. Wolters training base. The City of Mineral Wells bought the 22.8 miles of track to Weatherford October 1, 1989. It was the last operator, and kept the road open for freight traffic, for the benefit of local businesses. The passenger depot was restored after the trains ceased operations, and it is now [2008] the offices of the Elliott Waldren Abstract Company, and lawyer George Gault. The right-of-way from Mineral Wells to Weatherford was converted to a Texas Parks and Wildlife trail in June 1998. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29853/
[Lynch Plaza, 2 of 3, Different View]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29859/
[Lynch Plaza 3 of 3]
Lynch Plaza, in the center of this picture, is located on the corner of North Oak and East Hubbard Streets. This structure, originally called the Firstron Building, replaced the First National Bank at this location. The bank was located in the northwest corner of the Oxford Hotel. The hotel building, including the bank, was destroyed by fire in 1983. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29857/
[The East Side of the (Third) First Presbyterian Church Building]
This picture shows the back (east) side of the third First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. It features an arched window, and (presumably) the dedicatory cornerstone. Due to structural damage, this building was torn down in the 1980's, and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church - the third building at 300 NW 4th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25008/
[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]
This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25015/
[First Presbyterian Church - 3 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fourth in a series of pictures, showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows the dome over the Sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25032/
[First Presbyterian Church - 4 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fifth in a series of pictures of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. This picture shows the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church and the dome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25035/
[First Presbyterian Church -7 of 13: Dome Detail]
The eighth in a series of pictures of architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this picture is a close-up of the dome atop the sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25024/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 8 of 13: Gable Over the Entrance]
The ninth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this view is a close-up of the pediment over the front entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25039/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 9 of 13: South Side]
This photograph is the tenth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church. This picture is a view of the south side of the church, including, at left, the main entrance at southwest corner of building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25012/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 10 of 13: Close Up of Dome]
This is the eleventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church, being a close-up of the unique dome that topped the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25005/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 11 of 13: Close Up of the Dome]
This picture is the twelfth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of The First Presbyterian Church. This picture details the dome atop the church in a close-up view. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25023/
[First Presbyterian Church - 12 of 13: Front View]
This is the twelfth picture in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church prior to its demolition. This is a general view of the church from the southwest corner of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25030/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 5 of 18: Door Leading to Steeple]
The door at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. It leads to the steeple. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25003/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 9 of 18: Steps in Front of Church]
A view of the roof of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, as seen from the south. This view shows some of the rockwork landscaping on the south side of the church, located at 1201 SE 25th Avenue in Mineral Wells texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25006/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 10 of 18: Sun Shining on Roof]
The south gable of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, a detail of the roof of the Sanctuary and the roof of the hallway connecting the attached Fellowship Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25043/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 11 of 18: Retaining Wall Leading to Church]
The south entrance to St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas), is shown here, with some of the rockwork landscaping. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25029/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 12 of 18: Close Up of Wood Shingles]
The wooden shingles (shakes) on roof of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas are shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25044/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 13 of 18: Curved Wood of Steeple]
A tilted picture of the peak of the gable on the north end of the roof, St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) is shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25036/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 14 of 18: Side View of Wood Shingles]
The roof at the south end of St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25027/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 15 of 18: Close Up of Rockwork]
The gable at the south end of St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25026/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 18 of 18, Architectural Close Up View of Steeple]
Looking vertically up the gable at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25018/
[Dedication of Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum: Senator Tom Creighton Addresses an Audience]
This is yet another picture of the dedication of "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum. [See previous photographs for more details.] Senator Tom Creighton is shown addressing an attentive audience. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29869/
[Dedication of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum: A Marker is Unveiled]
A marker commemorating the conversion of Mineral Wells' first school to a museum. "The Little Rock Schoolhouse" was built in 1884, and though tuition was charged to the students to pay the teacher, the school building, itself, was built by the city. A granite marker to commemorate the conversion of the school to a museum was unveiled at this dedication. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29873/
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16139/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 4 of 21, Fire Inside the Structure]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire received extensive photographic coverage. Note the height of the flames in this picture, taken in the later stages of the fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29900/
[The Brewer Home]
The Brewer home on East Mountain is shown here, from a picture taken April 4, 1976. It is visible from most of North Oak Avenue. Originally the Murphy Home, the building underwent many renovations during the period of Mr. Murphy's residence. Mr. Murphy was a contractor who built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School (1914) and the third First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20249/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29918/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 4 of 4: Spillway]
Shown here is the lower end of the spillway from Lake Mineral Wells after the flood in March 1976. The dam is barely visible at the upper end of the spillway in the middle of the picture. The road directly below the dam is under water, and is not visible in any other pictures of this flood. It suffered such severe damage that it had to be rebuilt. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29916/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 4 of 5]
A holograph legend on the back of this picture states: "Tearing down Convention Hall 1976." The photograph illustrates the demolition of the building in full swing. Only the skeleton of the roof remains, and the walls are in ruins. This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39234/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 5 of 21: View from the Rear of the Building]
The Damron Hotel was built in 1906 as the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt. It was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in 1917 in exchange for a ranch, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, the hotel burned completely on December 22, 1975 in a spectacular fire that was extensively photographed. Shown here is one of many views of the fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29901/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 6 of 21: Bystanders Observing the Fire]
The Damron Hotel was destroyed (on December 22, 1975) in a spectacular fire that received extensive photographic coverage. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard. This is another picture of that immense conflagration. Originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 , the name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29899/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 9 of 21: Firemen and a Fire Truck Near the North Side of Budiling]
This photograph shows another view of the early response to the holiday conflagration that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The Damron was built in 1906, during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort city. Originally named the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt, and built for his second wife, the name of the hotel was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard, and the spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29896/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 11 of 21: Fighting the Fire on W. Hubbard St.]
Shown here is another picture in the series of photographs of the fire that destroyed the Damron Hotel during the holiday season of 1975. This smoke-shrouded scene of W. Hubbard, shows the front entrance to the hotel in the earlier stages of the fire's progress. The Damron was built in 1906, during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa. It burned completely on December 22,1975. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, between Hubbard and S.W. 1st Streets, and was originally built as The Colonial Hotel by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The hotel's name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was a very popular hotel through the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29894/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 12 of 21: Numerous Fire Hoses Lying in Front of the Hotel]
Another view of the front entrance to the Damron Hotel at 109 W. Hubbard during the earlier stages of the fire that completely destroyed it on December 22, 1975. The hotel was originally built in 1906 during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort spa. It was built by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. Originally named The Colonial Hotel, the name was changed 1n 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. The spectacular Holiday fire that destroyed the hotel received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29893/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 15 of 21: Passenger Cars on a Back Street]
The Damron Hotel, built in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street. This picture shows the dense cloud of smoke that resulted from the holiday catastrophe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29890/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 17 of 21: Two Individuals on the Street Northwest of the Fire]
Shown here is another view of the plume of thick black smoke at the height of the fire that completely destroyed the Damron Hotel December 22, 1975, along with two hard-hatted individuals (presumably fire-fighters) standing in the street. The hotel was originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife, because the second Mrs. Holt said that she would not live in the country. Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch in 1917, and the hotel's name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was a very popular hotel during the mineral water industry's heyday through the Roaring Twenties, Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29888/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 1 of 8, Mayor H. Authur Zappe ]
When the book, "Time Was in Mineral Wells," First Edition, by A. F. Weaver was published in 1975, the first ten copies were autographed by the author and auctioned to the highest bidder. The auction was held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse", and shows Mayor H. Arthur Zappe addressing the crowd in attendance at the auction. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29431/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 2 of 8, A. F. Weaver]
This picture shows Ed Ford, standing before the picture he had painted of Mineral Wells' First Public School. It was built in 1884, and restored in 1975 by The Mineral Wells Heritage Association as a museum to preserve the history of the city. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29422/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 3 of 8, Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore]
The picture shows the auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, acknowledging a bid on a First Edition print of A. F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells." To the auctioneer's right is author A. F. Weaver. The author's wife, Patsy, is standing in the window to the author's right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29429/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 4 of 8, Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore Auctioneer ]
The auction of copies of the first Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, was held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." The auctioneer, the Reverend Bobby Moore, is asking for bids on a copy in this picture. The author, A. F. Weaver, stands between the windows to the auctioneer's right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29428/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 8 of 8, Auctioneer]
The auction of copies of the first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." This picture shows the auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, with the autographed Copy Number 1. Author A.F. Weaver looks on in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29430/
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20247/
[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]
Trees in full foliage (in July of 1975) obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2009] owned by David Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16153/
[416 NW 6th Street]
Shown here is a photograph of the front and west side of a multi-story Queen Anne-style, cement block house located at 416 NW 6th Street in Mineral Wells, Texas. It has many architectural features displaying sub-types including Patterned Masonry and Free Classic, such as the shaped parapets on the tower, and on the gables (Patterned Masonry), as well as the Palladian window on the tower (Free Classic). The rectangular tower is unusual. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16173/
[The Calvary Baptist Church]
The Calvary Baptist Church was originally located at 708 SE 5th Street. This picture was taken in 1975, shortly before the building was torn down and replaced by a more modern facility. Both the red-brick-trimmed native rock church and parsonage suffered substantial structural deterioration, which necessitated replacement. This series of pictures was probably taken for both a pictorial history of the old church, as well as photographic evidence of the deterioration of the structure that warranted its destruction and replacement. The new church, at this same location, now faces SE 6th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29455/
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