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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1970-1979
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16139/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29917/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 4 of 21, Fire Inside the Structure]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. The fire received extensive photographic coverage. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29900/
Woodman of the World Camp Meeting , June 19, 1947
A white-ink legend on the face of this photograph reads: Woodman [sic] of the World Camp Meeting----6-19-47 Mineral Wells, Texas. phillips [sic] photographic [sic] Service [sic] A typed legend on the back of the photograph reads: WOW MEETING 6-19-47 held in Convention Hall. Recognized Front [sic] row from left: #1 Ezra Wortham. #5 Charlie Sheridan, #6 George Oliver 3rd. Row standing #1 John Birdwell, #5 Louis Fryer, #6 John Miller, #7 Ben Yeager, #12 Bill Teichman. 4th row: #1 Charlie Langley #15 Roy Langley [Unreadable deletions in green ink above appear this caption] This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39237/
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and was designed as an entertainment and social center. The style of the house has been tentatively identified as Italian Renaissance. This house was also home to the John Moore family, and to the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of house was taken April 4, 1976. This photograph is to be found on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16165/
[The Brewer Home]
The Brewer home on East Mountain is shown here, from a picture taken April 4, 1976. It is visible from most of North Oak Avenue. Originally the Murphy Home, the building underwent many renovations during the period of Mr. Murphy's residence. Mr. Murphy was a contractor who built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School (1914) and the third First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20249/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4,]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29918/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 4 of 4: Spillway]
Shown here is the lower end of the spillway from Lake Mineral Wells after the flood in March 1976. The dam is barely visible at the upper end of the spillway in the middle of the picture. The road directly below the dam is under water, and is not visible in any other pictures of this flood. It suffered such severe damage that it had to be rebuilt. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29916/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall]
A holograph legend on the back of this picture states: "Tearing down Convention Hall 1976." The photograph illustrates the demolition of the building in full swing. Only the skeleton of the roof remains, and the walls are in ruins. This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39234/
Three Railroads to Mineral Wells
Pamphlet containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20345/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 1 of 21, Dec. 22, 1975]
The fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975. The hotel was located at 109 West Hubbard Street, facing north, before the unfortunate conflagration. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, located in the same block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20222/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 2 of 21: View South/Southeast ]
The Colonial Hotel was built in 1906 by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store on S. Oak at the back of the hotel. The name of the hotel was changed to The Damron Hotel around 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. A hardware store, hard by, was sold to Mr. Holt's manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel, located at 109 W. Hubbbard, and Davidson Hardware, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Please note the Christmas decoration, symbol of the season, on the telephone pole above the fire truck. The main entrance to the hotel is faintly visible through the dense smoke to the rear of the fire truck. The Crazy Hotel can be seen at the lower left edge of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29903/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 3 of 21: Baker Hotel in Background]
The Damron Hotel (very popular in the resort city of Mineral Wells through the periods of the Roaring Twenties, The Great Depression and World War II) was originally built as The Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J.T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store at the back of the hotel facing S. Oak Ave. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron around 1917 for a ranch, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Mr. Holt sold the hardware store to his manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel and Davidson Hardware burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture of the fire was taken looking east on Hubbard Street. The Baker Hotel in the left middle of the photograph is to the north of most of the smoke. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29902/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 5 of 21: View from the Rear of the Building]
The Damron Hotel was built in 1906 as the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. It was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in 1917 for a ranch, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, the hotel burned completely on December 22, 1975 in a spectacular fire that was extensively photographed. Shown here is one view of the fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29901/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 6 of 21: Bystanders Observing Fire]
The Damron Hotel was destroyed (on December 22, 1975) in a spectacular fire that received extensive photographic coverage. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard. This is another picture of that immense conflagration. Originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29899/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 7 of 21: The Parking Lot Behind the Hotel]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 Christmas Season. The Damron was originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. The fire was covered extensively by free-lance photographers. The hotel was formerly located on at 109 W. Hubbard Street, on the corner of the block that included SW 1st Avenue and SW 1st Street. This picture was taken during the later stages of the fire, and shows the gutted rear of the hotel, with huge flames still burning in the front portion of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29898/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 8 of 21: An Early Stage of the Fire, Looking North]
This view of the spectacular holiday fire that consumed the Damron Hotel completely on December 22, 1975, was taken from SW 1st Street at the southwest corner of the block in the early stages of the fire. The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when it was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard, and the fire received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29897/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 9 of 21: Firemen and a Fire Truck Near the North Side of Budiling]
This photograph shows another view of the early response to the holiday conflagration that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The Damron was built in 1906, during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort city. Originally named the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt, and built for his second wife because she would not live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard, and the spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29896/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 10 of 21]
Another in the extensive series of photographs that covered the spectacular holiday fire that completely consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 holiday season. This picture shows some of the early response to the fire. Note, for example, the electrical utility truck, which has arrived to cut off electrical power to the buildings. The Damron Hotel (which was built during the days when Mineral Wells was a resort) was originally named the Colonial Hotel. It was built in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage. The sign "Pemberton Appliance and Plumbing", located across the street west, is visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29895/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 11 of 21: Fighting the Fire on W. Hubbard St.]
Shown here is another picture in the series of photographs of the fire that destroyed the Damron Hotel during the holiday season of 1975. This smoke-shrouded scene of W. Hubbard, shows the front entrance to the hotel in the earlier stages of the fire's progress. The Damron was built in 1906, during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa. It burned completely on December 22,1975. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, between Hubbard and S.W. 1st Streets, and was originally built as The Colonial Hotel by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The hotel's name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was a very popular hotel through the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29894/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 12 of 21: Numerous Fire Hoses Lying in Front of the Hotel]
Another view of the front entrance to the Damron Hotel at 109 W. Hubbard during the earlier stages of the fire that completely destroyed it on December 22, 1975. The hotel was originally built in 1906 during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort spa. It was built by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. Originally named The Colonial Hotel, the name was changed 1n 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. The spectacular Holiday fire that destroyed the hotel received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29893/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 15 of 21: Passenger Cars on a Back Street]
The Damron Hotel, built in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street. This picture shows the dense cloud of smoke that resulted from the holiday catastrophe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29890/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 16 of 21: Black Smoke Billowing Over Businesses]
Shown here is another view of the huge column of black smoke accompanying the Damron Hotel fire that completely destroyed the hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built in 1906 as the Colonial Hotel by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The popular hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in 1917 for a ranch, and its name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, and the spectacular fire that destroyed it received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29889/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 17 of 21: Two Individuals on the Street Northwest of the Fire]
Shown here is another view of the plume of thick black smoke at the height of the fire that completely destroyed the Damron Hotel December 22, 1975, along with two hard-hatted individuals (presumably fire-fighters) standing in the street. The hotel was originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife, because the second Mrs. Holt would not live in the country. Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch in 1917, and the hotel's name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was a very popular hotel during the mineral water industry's heyday through the Roaring Twenties, Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29888/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 18 of 21: Individual in Front of the Burning Hotel]
The Damron Hotel, built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was built by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country. It was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917 and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Shown here is another view of the front entrance to the hotel as flames burst through the front wall of the building. The gesturing individual with the hard hat has not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29887/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 19 of 21, Two People Looking South from North]
The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the heyday of Mineral Wells as a popular resort city. Mr. J. T. Holt built it for his second wife, who would not live in the country. It was traded in 1917 for a ranch to Agnew and Bessie Damron, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture shows the front entrance under a dark plume of black smoke, with flames breaking through the upper floors of the front wall. Two people (one with a hard hat, and one without)stand observing the proceedings. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29886/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 20 of 21: Different View of the Fire]
Shown here is yet another view of fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975 is shown here. The hotel was located in the 109 W. Hubbard Street. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, which was in the same building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20302/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 21 of 21: An Early Stage, Looking East, Smoke Billowing]
Here is a view of the Damron Hotel (formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street)during the early stages of the fire (on December 22, 1975) that completely destroyed it. Built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country, and traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was a popular hotel during the heyday of Mineral Wells--through the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29885/
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the purchaser who bought the first copy of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", and his wife. Left to right are: Rev. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Jack Dickens, purchaser; A.F. Weaver, author; Mrs. Jean Dickens. Copy Number One sold for $153.57. (H. Arthur Zappe D.D.S., bought copy Number Two for $45, and Bill Bennett bought copy Number Three for an undisclosed price.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20410/
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the auction of the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1975. Identified (facing the crowd in front row) are Mrs. Richard Warren (with arms folded); Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; A.F. (Art) Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore, Auctioneer. The auction took place inside the restored "Little Rock School", Mineral Wells' first public school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20409/
[A Scene at auction of First Edition of TIME WAS]
Attendants at an auction of the First Edition of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" shown here, are, left to right: Mrs. Richard Warren;, Mrs. Morris Thompkins; Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; Mr. A.F. Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore; Auctioneer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20411/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 1 of 8, Mayor H. Authur Zappe ]
When the book, "Time Was in Mineral Wells," First Edition, by A. F. Weaver was published in 1975, the first ten copies were autographed by the author and auctioned to the highest bidder. The auction was held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse", and shows Mayor H. Arthur Zappe addressing the crowd in attendance at the auction. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29431/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 2 of 8, A. F. Weaver]
This picture shows Ed Ford, standing before the picture he had painted of Mineral Wells' First Public School. It was built in 1884, and restored in 1975 by The Mineral Wells Heritage Association as a museum to preserve the history of the city. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29422/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 3 of 8, Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore]
The picture shows the auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, acknowledging a bid on a First Edition print of A. F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells." To the auctioneer's right is author A. F. Weaver. The author's wife, Patsy, is standing in the window to the author's right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29429/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 4 of 8, Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore Auctioneer ]
The auction of copies of the first Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, was held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." The auctioneer, the Reverend Bobby Moore, is asking for bids on a copy in this picture. The author, A. F. Weaver, stands between the windows to the auctioneer's right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29428/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 5 of 8, Mr. & Mrs. Jack Dickens purchased 1st Book]
The auction of copies of the first Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." Pictured here are auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, and successful bidders on Copy No. 1: Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dickens. The author, A.F. Weaver, stands in the background, and Mrs. Bea Harris is in the corner to the right of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29425/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 6 of 8, Community Leaders]
The auction of the first ten numbered copies of the First Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", was held in the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." The auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, stands with Mayor H. Arthur Zappe, successful bidder for copy Number 2 in this picture. Author A. F. Weaver stands to the rear of Reverend Mr. Moore and Mayor Zappe. Banker Frost Bowman, successful bidder for Copy Number 4, is in the corner at right of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29426/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 7 of 8, Jack Dickens and Unknown Man Displaying Their Books]
The auction of copies of the first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29424/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 8 of 8, Auctioneer]
The auction of copies of the first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." This picture shows the auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, with the autographed Copy Number 1. Author A.F. Weaver looks on in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29430/
[The TIME WAS Book Auction]
The auction of first edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." The men in picture were: (left to right) the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Art Weaver, author; H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, Mayor of Mineral Wells; and Frost Bowman, Banker. The Reverend Mr. Moore was pastor of the First Baptist Church at the time. Mr. Weaver was a photographer, and the first president of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Dr. Zappe was a dentist, and Mr. Bowman was a Director of Mineral Wells Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20412/
[612 NW 6th Street]
This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16172/
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20247/
[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]
Trees in full foliage in July of 1975 obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2011] owned by an oculist, Dr. Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16153/
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60945/
[The Crazy Hotel]
This pictures shows the east side of the Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927, and occupies the entire west side of the 400 block of N. Oak Avenue. The Crazy is now [2008] a retirement home. Across N. Oak Avenue (the main street in the picture) and on the right (east) of the Crazy, is the building (with the Community Aerial Cable Company sign) that once housed Stoker Pontiac. It is now [2008] occupied by Bennett's Office Supply. The Grand Theater (originally the Crazy Theater at 400 N. Oak, and now [2008] The Faith Covenant Church) can be seen at the far end of that block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29963/
[Bill Cameron in Front of Old "Index" Building]
Bill Cameron stands before the old "Index" Building--on Northwest First Avenue (across from the Crazy Water Building). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39254/
[The Calvary Baptist Church]
The Calvary Baptist Church was originally located at 708 SE 5th Street. This picture was taken in 1975, shortly before the building was torn down and replaced by a more modern facility. Both the red-brick-trimmed native rock church and parsonage suffered substantial structural deterioration, which necessitated replacement. This series of pictures was probably taken for both a pictorial history of the old church, as well as photographic evidence of the deterioration of the structure that warranted its destruction and replacement. The new church, at this same location, now faces SE 6th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29455/
[The Calvary Baptist Church in 1975]
The Calvary Baptist Church, as it appeared in 1975, is shown here. Note the combined use of native stone and brick and the lack of a peaked roof. The upper part of the windows appear to be stained glass. This one of a series of pictures of the church and parsonage, showing structural damage prior to their demolition. This native rock and red brick church faced south on SE 5th Street, and the white brick structure which replaced it is built on the same city block but faces west on SE 6th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24992/
[ A Close-up of Calvary Baptist Parsonage]
This home was the parsonage of Calvary Baptist Church in 1975, according to a note on back of the picture. Note the brick crosses worked into the stone-work above the front door and on the chimney. The picture also shows some structural cracks in the native sandstone rockery above the entrance and window, probably indicating foundation damage. There are also some weathered holes in the structurally- sound, but odd, limestone rocks used in construction. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24994/
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 1 of 3, The Baker Hotel is in the Background]
This series of photographs was taken in 1975, during the construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Howard Brothers Department Store was an early occupant of the site. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan. A new First State Bank currently occupies this entire city block. A good view of the south side of the Baker Hotel is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29421/
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