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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[612 NW 6th Street]
This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16172/
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20247/
[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]
Trees in full foliage in July of 1975 obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2011] owned by an oculist, Dr. Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16153/
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60945/
[The Crazy Hotel]
This pictures shows the east side of the Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927, and occupies the entire west side of the 400 block of N. Oak Avenue. The Crazy is now [2008] a retirement home. Across N. Oak Avenue (the main street in the picture) and on the right (east) of the Crazy, is the building (with the Community Aerial Cable Company sign) that once housed Stoker Pontiac. It is now [2008] occupied by Bennett's Office Supply. The Grand Theater (originally the Crazy Theater at 400 N. Oak, and now [2008] The Faith Covenant Church) can be seen at the far end of that block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29963/
[Bill Cameron in Front of Old "Index" Building]
Bill Cameron stands before the old "Index" Building--on Northwest First Avenue (across from the Crazy Water Building). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39254/
[The Calvary Baptist Church]
The Calvary Baptist Church was originally located at 708 SE 5th Street. This picture was taken in 1975, shortly before the building was torn down and replaced by a more modern facility. Both the red-brick-trimmed native rock church and parsonage suffered substantial structural deterioration, which necessitated replacement. This series of pictures was probably taken for both a pictorial history of the old church, as well as photographic evidence of the deterioration of the structure that warranted its destruction and replacement. The new church, at this same location, now faces SE 6th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29455/
[The Calvary Baptist Church in 1975]
The Calvary Baptist Church, as it appeared in 1975, is shown here. Note the combined use of native stone and brick and the lack of a peaked roof. The upper part of the windows appear to be stained glass. This one of a series of pictures of the church and parsonage, showing structural damage prior to their demolition. This native rock and red brick church faced south on SE 5th Street, and the white brick structure which replaced it is built on the same city block but faces west on SE 6th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24992/
[ A Close-up of Calvary Baptist Parsonage]
This home was the parsonage of Calvary Baptist Church in 1975, according to a note on back of the picture. Note the brick crosses worked into the stone-work above the front door and on the chimney. The picture also shows some structural cracks in the native sandstone rockery above the entrance and window, probably indicating foundation damage. There are also some weathered holes in the structurally- sound, but odd, limestone rocks used in construction. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24994/
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 1 of 3, The Baker Hotel is in the Background]
This series of photographs was taken in 1975, during the construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Howard Brothers Department Store was an early occupant of the site. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan. A new First State Bank currently occupies this entire city block. A good view of the south side of the Baker Hotel is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29421/
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 2 of 3: A Piggy Wiggly Is in the Background]
The construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, at 101 SE 1st Avenue in 1975, was documented in this series of photographs. The Howard Building, the first of the complex of Howard Brothers Department Stores, had been built on this location in the early 1900's. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. The Piggly Wiggly Grocery Store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the Green Stamp Store are visible across SE 1st Avenue, south of the Savings and Loan. The new First State State currently covers the entire city block at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29420/
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 3 of 3: The East Side of the Construction]
This series of photographs of the construction of Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was taken in 1975. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. D.M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive from North Carolina. He later sent for his other brothers to establish the Howard Brothers Department Stores complex in the early 1900's. The Baker Hotel, directly across E. Hubbard north of the Savings and Loan, is seen to the left of the picture. Across SE 1st Street, to the south, were the Piggly Wiggly Grocery store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the S & H Green Stamp store. The First State Bank now occupies this entire city block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29419/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall--1 of 2: Front View]
The metal framework of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall is all that it readily visible during its demolition in 1975. Built on the rock foundation of the Hexagon House Electric Plant (for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention in 1925), it served as the site of numerous local functions including High School Graduation Exercises. The landmark Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the left foreground of this picture from 1897 to 1959. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29412/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 2 of 2: From a Block Away]
This photograph was taken at an early stage of the demolition of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall on N. Oak Avenue. Built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, it was constructed on the rock foundation of the Hexagon Hotel's electric power plant. The Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the foreground of this picture. It was torn down in 1959. When the Convention Hall was torn down in 1975, a member of the demolition crew said the new owner of the former London Bridge (to be re-erected at Havasu City in Arizona)was interested in acquiring the rocks to build the foundation for a fort to be constructed at the same site. (One local story credits that interest in the foundation stones as the reason for the demolition of the Convention Hall.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29413/
[The Mineral Wells Fire Department in 1975 ]
Shown in the top row are: Rene James, Weldon Hood, Jerry Kidwell, Walter Carter, Jerry Loftis. In the middle row: Eddie Bell, Eldred Fryer, Horace Roe, Bud Smith, Joe Knight, Kenneth Kinder. In the front row: B.H. Gilstrap, Eddie Fryer, Melton Brewton (Chief), Jerry Van Natta, Allen Fryer, Rickey Epperson, Larry Clutts, Louis Clutts, Butch Clutts, Gene Knerr, Davis Light, John Gilbert, Byron Kizziah, Bazil Wright, R.S. Purcell, W.G. Mullins, Sam Smith, Arthur Schulte, Cecil Holifield. Information for these names was taken from the back of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29828/
[A Piano Recital, 1 of 10]
A photograph of a piano recital, from a roll of film labeled "Ina Howard Ramsey." Mrs. Ramsey's parents once operated the former Star Boarding House on NW 2nd Street. She is shown playing an upright piano at the base of a stage in the First Presbyterian church's Fellowship Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29441/
[A Piano Recital, 2 of 10]
According to the notes that accompanied this series of negatives, a piano recital was held about the same time as the auction of Mr. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." Mr. Weaver photographed both events. The piano recital was given in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church. Ina Howard Ramsey is the pianist. Mrs. Ramsey was visiting her native home of Mineral Wells at the time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29440/
[A Piano Recital, 3 of 10]
This photograph was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The note included in this series of pictures suggests that a piano recital was held about the same time as the auction of Mr. Weaver's book. Mr. Weaver photographed both events. The site of the recital was the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church. Ina Howard Ramsey is the pianist. The recital was an entertainment for the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29439/
[A Piano Recital, 4 of 10]
This photograph is taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Mrs. Ramsey gave a piano recital in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church on August 28, 1975 as an entertainment for the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Mr. Weaver photographed this event, as well as the auction of his book. Mrs. Ramsey was born in Mineral Wells. Her parents owned the Star House--a boarding house--at what was then 315 Coke Street, but is now [2008] 315 NW 2nd Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29438/
[A Piano Recital, 5 of 10]
This photograph, along with nine others, was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Thelma Doss, a local radio personality and historian, is pictured with the pianist in this photograph. The recital was given in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29437/
[Piano Recital, 6 of 10]
This picture was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The photograph seems to be of a registration table at a piano recital featuring Mrs. Ramsey. The table in the background contains art work. Other pictures in this series indicate that an art show was held in conjunction with the piano recital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29436/
[A Piano Recital, 7 of 10]
A picture taken from from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The label with this roll of pictures, along with others in this series, shows Ina Howard Ramsey, the pianist, greeting Jo Losen, the Layout and Artwork Editor of "Time Was...", after her performance. Art exhibits along the wall in this picture, along with a stack of books in another photograph in this series, suggests a piano recital may have been part of a combination piano recital/art show/book sale. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29435/
[A Piano Recital, 8 of 10]
An image taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Mrs. Ramsey is shown signing Jo Losen's copy of "Time Was..." Art work in this picture seems to indicate the event was a combination piano recital and sale of Mrs. Ramsey's art work. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29434/
[A Piano Recital, 9 of 10]
Taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey", this series of pictures seems to have covered a combination piano recital/art sale. This picture is of the pianist, Ina Howard Ramsey, visiting with some of the younger members of the audience following the recital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29433/
[A Piano Recital, 10 of 10]
The pianist, Ina Howard Ramsey, seems to be announcing her next selection to the audience of a piano recital given August 28, 1975.The event took place in the Fellowship Hall of First Presbyterian church. The recital was held about the same time as the auction of the first ten copies of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells . . . .", and Mr. Weaver photographed both events. Mrs. Ramsey was an artiste as well as a pianist, and she displayed some of her art work as well as playing the piano. Mrs. Ramsey, though born in Mineral Wells in 1896 to parents who were owners of the Star House (a boarding house), was visiting Mineral Wells from her home in Oklahoma at the time of this photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29432/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 1 of 15: Will Poston]
Will Poston is shown standing in the cashier's station of his department store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). Note the conveyor system by which the cashier received cash and statements from various departments, and distributed change and receipts. Central cashiers were common in department stores from the years of the Great Depression through the time of World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29959/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 2 of 15: Will Poston Inside His Store]
Will Poston stands at the cashier's station, preparing to dispatch a runner to a clerk in his store, Poston Dry Goods, It was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29957/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 3 of 15: Will Poston Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston, seated at the cashier's station in his store, Poston Dry Goods, located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29954/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 4 of 15: Will Poston Holding Cable System]
Will Poston, standing, is poised in preparation to dispatch a container along a cable from the central cashier's office in his store, Poston Dry Goods in 1975. The store was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29951/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 5 of 15: View of Safe]
Will Poston sits next to the safe in Poston Dry Goods store in 1975. Note the lettering on the safe "Baker, Poston and Co." Also note the many ledger books, which contained the numerous accounts and records required by the store's manual bookkeeping system, around Mr. Poston. Poston's was the largest apparel store in Mineral Wells after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the glass show cases in Poston's had come from the earlier Howards' store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29940/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 6 of 15: With Display Case]
Will Poston stands with an antique [in 2008] thread (Please not the markings, "Clark", "O.N.T." "White" "Colors" on the drawers) cabinet in his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). The year of the picture is 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29939/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 7 of 15: With Display Case, Drawers Open]
Will Poston stands in the sewing department of his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). The display case is open to show the different types and colors of sewing thread in stock. Colored threads were separated from white for easier selection, and both were available in various brands, spooled quantities and thread sizes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29937/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 8 of 15: Royal Society Display Case]
The Royal Society embroidery and tatting thread display case with its owner, Will Poston standing next to it, is shown in the photograph. Poston Dry Goods stood at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29933/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 9 of 15: Outside of Store Front]
Will Poston stands in front of his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). Poston's was the largest department store in Mineral Wells after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the glass show cases in Poston's came from the earlier Howard Brothers store. These cases are on display in the store. The store itself is now the Mineral Wells branch of the Palo Pinto County courthouse. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29928/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 11 of 15: Inside View of Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The picture gives a broad view of the boot department of the Western attire carried by the store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29942/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 12 of 15: Inside View of his Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, preparing to dispatch a container to his cashier's department. A view of the boot department, with a typical stock of Western boots, is displayed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29946/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 13 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston stands in his store, Poston Dry Goods, located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, prepaaring to dispatch a container with change to a clerk along the messenger system in use in his store. The photograph was taken in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29949/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 14 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston surveys the domain in his store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The photograph was taken about 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29947/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 15 of 15; Dry Goods case]
A sewing-thread display case, bearing the Corlicelli brand name, inside the Poston Dry Goods store (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). Poston's was the largest dry goods store in town after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the display cases in Poston's (perhaps this was one of them) had come from the earlier Howard Brothers' store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29924/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 16 of 18: Roof Reaching Towards the Heavens]
A detail of the gable and roof at the south end of St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25025/
[A Marina on Possum Kingdom Lake]
Shown here is a view of Possum Kingdom Lake, at possibly Harmar Harbor, showing one of its many marinas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38093/
[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]
A view of part of Possum Kingdom Lake from Observation Point, taken August 11, 1974. Although it is not readily visible, the Morris Sheppard Dam, which impounds the Brazos River to form Possum Kingdom Lake, is on the far right edge of the picture. The view is from a vantage point approximately 150 feet above the water, which in its turn is approximately 190 feet deep at this point. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38094/
[Panorama 1974 (fourth)]
A view of Mineral Wells,is shown, looking southwest from East Mountain over the First National Bank (now Bank of America). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16242/
[Panorama 1974 (ninth)]
A panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church (in front) is show, taken from Welcome Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16237/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (eleventh)]
A panorama of East Hubbard Street, taken from Welcome Mountain, showing Elmwood cemetery is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16235/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (fifth) ]
A panoramic view, probably from South Mountain, looking north-east is shown here. A portion of the mountain has been dug out and leveled for a gasoline station. Also visible are the Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) to the left of center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16241/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16245/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (second)]
This picture shows a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16244/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (seventh)]
A panoramic view of the city from Welcome Mountain is shown. Elmwood Cemetery is visible in the upper left part of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16239/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (sixth)]
A panorama, taken from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over North Oak Street in Mineral Wells. The Convention Center, Box Factory, and The Crazy Water Hotel are visible. Native plants are visible in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16240/