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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Rock School House]
The Rock School, erected in 1884, was Mineral Wells' first public school. It was last used in 1957 as a band hall. It was leased to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association in 1974, renovated and converted to a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the City of Mineral Wells. This picture appears to have been taken at the time of its renovation and conversion, as the worker on the ladder makes evident. The bell tower has been enclosed, and window screens and doors have been painted or replaced. The property now belongs to the Fifty Year Club, but the museum is still operated by the non-profit Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25048/
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20338/
[The Sangcura Sprudel Fire]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well drinking pavilion was originally located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. It was moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches on the building were enclosed, and it was converted to a rooming house. It burned December 5, 1973, just five minutes before the start of the Mineral Wells Christmas Parade. The remaining part of the Period Hotel on N.W. 4th Avenue, which also burned at another date, was converted into apartments that can be seen through the smoke in the upper left of the picture. This photograph is found on page 64 of A.F Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells,"' First Edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20304/
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [], No. [], Ed. 1 Monday, October 2, 1972
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477386/
Medical Facts for Pilots
This pamphlet gives an overview of information for pilots to maintain good health and recognize warning signs of problems they might face specific to flying. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46559/
[The Welcome Sign]
The WELCOME Sign (shown here) was built in 1922 by George Holmgren, the Texas Rotary Club's Governor,in his San Antonio iron works following the State Rotary Club's Convention in Mineral Wells. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain what was, at the time, the world's largest non-commercial lighted sign. The original incandescent bulbs were later replaced with lower-maintenance red neon lights by the Mineral Wells Jaycees. A Warrant Officer Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from its original site on East Mountain to the east side of Bald Mountain (now called Welcome Mountain), overlooking Elmwood Cemetery, in 1972. It remains there today [2008], lighted at its base with flood lights, to greet visitors coming from the east. This is a picture, taken in 1972, of the restored sign. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29410/
Radar Summary Chart
This booklet gives an overview of radar summary charts as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Introduction to Radar Summary Charts." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on page 14. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46566/
Moisture and Clouds
This booklet gives an overview of moisture and cloud formations as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Cloud formation, international classification, abbreviations, and symbols" as well as "General flight conditions associated with stratiform and cumuliform clouds." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46580/
Pressure and Wind
This booklet gives an overview of pressure and wind as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Explanation of the effects of pressure in the atmosphere to include altimeter error, identity of the standard reference plane, identity of and weather connected with high and low pressure systems plus associated winds." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46576/
Winds Aloft
This booklet gives an overview of winds aloft, as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Winds aloft, modes of observation, forecasts and charts." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46574/
The Reporter (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 6, No. 52, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 4, 1971
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth476225/
Air Masses
This booklet gives an overview of air masses as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Explanation of the classification of air masses; weather associated with particular air masses; [and the] trajectory and source region of air masses that invade the United States." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46578/
Icing
This booklet gives an overview of icing as it relates to aviation. It includes information on "Three types of icing and associated cloud formations and temperatures" as well as "Hazards and flight procedures in icing", according to the scope notes on the title page. The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46570/
Atmosphere and Temperature
This booklet gives an overview of atmosphere and temperature as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Pressure scale measurement, isobars, forces that affect winds, high and low pressure systems and associate weather[-]formation prevailing wind belts." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46577/
Mountain Circulation
This booklet gives an overview of mountain circulation as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information to "Identify mountain circulation patterns, flight hazards, and recommended flight procedures for mountainous operations." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46572/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 25, Ed. 1 Saturday, May 2, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505612/
Weather Depiction Chart
This booklet gives an overview of weather depiction charts as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes, it includes information on "The ceiling and visibility at specific locations and the areas of IFR and VFR weather conditions." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46567/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 30, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505602/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 23, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505609/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 22, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 16, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505601/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 21, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 9, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505584/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 20, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 2, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505687/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 19, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505713/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 18, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 19, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505709/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 17, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505746/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 16, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505725/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505588/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 19, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505673/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 13, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505744/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505631/
Frontal Weather
This booklet gives an overview of frontal weather as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes a "Discussion of frontal weather systems to include identification, characteristics and flight techniques to be used when penetrating a given frontal system." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46579/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 11, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 29, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505614/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 10, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 22, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505735/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 9, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 15, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505710/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 8, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 8, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505599/
[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]
This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable and hipped roof, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16171/
[612 N. W. 6th Street]
This house is currently [2007] owned and occupied by Gil Hulls. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The style is tentatively thought to be neo-classic. The two-story porch is unusual. It shows evidence of much remodeling. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20264/
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
This home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first "Elegant" home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. This house has also been home to the John Moore family and the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of the house was taken in June 1974. Another photograph of the house, without the obscuring of the trees in full leaf, may be seen in the preceding photograph;or on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16170/
The 112th Cavalry Band, Mineral Wells, Texas
The writing on the drum identifies this band as being associated with the 112th Cavalry, which was stationed in Mineral Wells, Texas. A National Guard Cavalry unit was established on West Mountain in 1919. This photograph appears to be taken in front of the cavalry stable sometime between World Wars I and II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25070/
Aerial View of Camp Wolters
The only information about this photograph appears to be the written legends on it: [At its top] MW-4 AERIAL VIEW OF CAMP WOLTERS, TEXAS [At its bottom] PHOTO BY AERIAL PHOTO SERVICE KALAMAZOO--DALLAS 1B-H586 Camp Wolters was the predecessor of Fort Wolters in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39205/
[An Aerial View of Early Mineral Wells]
Two very early panoramic views of Mineral Wells are shown here, one of them, the UPPER PICTURE, being the north-west Business District of the city looking southwest. Note the horse-drawn transportation in the streets, and Poston's Dry Goods store in the upper middle. In the LOWER PICTURE looking northwest, a livery stable shows in the lower left corner; the Hawthorn Water Pavilion (with spire) is shown in the left middle above and right of the livery stable barn; the Crazy Drinking Pavilion is the large two-story building at upper middle of lower photograph; and the Hexagon Hotel is near the skyline at the upper right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16213/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
Illustrated here is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east looking west. The Parkwood apartments and the brick factory are in the background. The Sands Motel is in the bottom part of the picture, and East Hubbard Street (Highway US 180) is in the far lower left corner of the picture. The large vacant area was later developed, with Lakewell House Retirement Home built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16199/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, looking northwest. Identified buildings include the Baker Hotel (center), the Hexagon Hotel (right, north of Baker), the Convention Hall (next to and right of the Hexagon), the Box Factory (formerly the Crazy Water Crystal plant, left and west of the Hexagon Hotel), the First Methodist Church (across street right and northeast of Baker), the Baker Parking Garage (across the street, south of and immediately in front of the Hotel in this picture), and the Baker Water Works (extreme right middle, up the slope of East Mountain.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16222/
[An Aerial View of Northwest Mineral Wells]
An aerial view of northwest Mineral Wells that was taken between 1959 and 1969 is shown here. The Hexagon Hotel on North Oak Street can be seen in the center left foreground with the Convention Center immediately north (to the right)of it, and the Crazy Water Crystal plant two blocks northwest. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16234/
[Another View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows several different styles of house prominent in Mineral Wells, ranging from Colonial Revival (center) Queen Anne (upper tier, right), to Classical Revival (Upper tier, center). The Convention Hall is barely visible in the lower left corner, so the picture clearly antedates its demolition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60952/
[The Arlington Hotel]
The Arlington Hotel--the largest hotel in Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas--with its famous thermal baths, is shown here. It is under the regulation of the United States Government. There is a beautiful "Cascade" swimming pool for guests. This picture is taken from a POST CARD titled "Plastichrome [Registered] by COLOUR PICTURES, INC. Boston, 10, Massachusetts U.S.A." This hotel was said to be the model for the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39167/
[Art Weaver 's Studio]
This picture shows the 400 block of North Oak Avenue as it was in 1975. Art Weaver Photography (412 North Oak Avenue) is shown, adjacent to and right of the Grand theater (formerly the Crazy Theater). (This picture collection is part of the lifetime collection of pictures of Art Weaver.) The Baker Hotel is in the background on the skyline at the far right of the picture. NOTE: The camera angle and its lens make this picture appear to be a street corner. However, North Oak Avenue is actually a straight street, running North-South. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20436/
[Ashburn Ice Cream Company]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60943/
[The Auction of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells, First Edition]
Shown here are the successful bidders for the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," first edition, 1975. Identified in the picture are Reverend Mister Bobby Moore (front row left) who was the auctioneer; Mr. Jack Dickens (next to Rev. Mr. Moore); and Mrs. Jack Dickens (behind her husband), who bought book number one; Frost Bowman (barely visible behind Mrs. Jack Dickens) bought the fourth book; Bill Bennett (back row fourth from right) bought book number three; A.F. Weaver (back row second from right) is the author of the book. (H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, former mayor of Mineral Wells, [not shown], bought copy No. 2 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20408/
The Avalon
The Avalon Hotel was located at NW 3rd Street and NW 3rd Avenue. Assembled here in front of the hotel is a group of people, possibly hotel guests. A reversed-image of this picture appears on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20306/