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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1900-1909
[A Mineral Wells Advertisement]

[A Mineral Wells Advertisement]

Date: 1906
Creator: unknown
Description: A 1906 seasonal advertisement, compliments Central Texas Realty Association, depicts a young lady (An Art Nouveau goddess?) half-kneeling before a frame that suggests stained glass. She is holding a water jug, from which pours a stream of healing elixir that splashes into the lowermost center of the brochure. Decorative scrolls reminiscent of wrought iron sculpture decorate the advertisement. Stars, both in the advertisement and on the lady's tiara, hint that Mineral Wells is the City of Light. What appears to be a coffee stain shows at the upper left. Someone has penciled "1905" in the upper right corner.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Souvenir...Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department

Souvenir...Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department

Date: 1906
Creator: Robinette, Alan M.
Description: Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet about the Mineral Wells, Texas, Volunteer Fire Department,published in 1906.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Convention, West Texas Chamber of Commerce

A Convention, West Texas Chamber of Commerce

Date: May 1905
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph shows a view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain. It is inscribed "Convention West Texas Chamber of Commerce." A companion picture is dated "May 4-5-6, 1925". The train depot is in the left middle background. The church in the middle foreground is the First Methodist Church, and immediately behind and above it is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel. The home to the left (east) of the Methodist Church was the home of Pharmacist C. Y. Yeager.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells

Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells

Date: 1905?
Creator: unknown
Description: Two contiguous negatives, taken from East Mountain, looking Southwest are shown here. Please note that some landmarks have been numbered in ink on the photographs. On the first [upper] photograph (No. 3), the pavilion with the steeple on the roof,is the Hawthorne well, located at 314 NW 1st Ave. (No. 4), the large two-story structure, is the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Lithia Pavilion is the structure between the Hawthorne and Crazy pavilions. Note also the Hawthorn House (No. 5?), located on North Oak. The large livery stable in the left foreground has not been identified by name. Please note the Poston Building on the second [lower] photograph, on North Oak (not numbered, but the three-part building in the middle left of the photograph). Also, please note the two steeples of the first Catholic Church on NW 3rd Street, in the 600 block, on the side of West Mountain. The large two-story frame hotel (No. 2) in the left foreground has not been identified.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Gibson Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Gibson Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1905?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Gibson Well, in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, was one of the first wells in Mineral Wells to establish a drinking pavilion for the convenience of its customers. In time it became one of the largest pavilions and parks in the city. The gasoline-powered "Dinky cars" of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway passed the Gibson Well (from 1905 to 1909) every quarter hour on their journey to Lake Pinto. The "Dinky car" tracks are barely visible in this photograph, but the well's extensive gardens had not yet been developed at this time. Drinking and bathing in the mineral water was believed to alleviate a variety of ailments and restore the body to health.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Group of Hikers]

[A Group of Hikers]

Date: 1905
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph shows group of two young men and six ladies on an outing in 1905. Note the walking "canes" held by several of the ladies. They appear to be resting at the souvenir photograph stand on the mountain trail about half-way to the top of East Mountain. Hiking to the top of East Mountain was a popular pastime for health seekers in the "City Built on Water" around the turn of the century.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A LakeWood Park Scenic Railway, Dinky Car "Esther"]

[A LakeWood Park Scenic Railway, Dinky Car "Esther"]

Date: 1905/1909
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph shows the "Dinkey Car", Esther, that operated on The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway to Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1907, at which time the lines were removed. The background indicates the picture was taken near Lake Pinto. This "Dinky Car" was one of two named "Esther" and "Susie" after local banker Cicero Smith's daughters. Banker Smith and Ed Dismuke, owner of The Famous Water Company, built the Scenic Railway. These little cars, powered by gasoline engines, ran every 15 minutes from Mineral Wells, around West Mountain, to Lake Pinto. A larger version, called the "Ben Hur", was added in 1907. Round trip cost 15 cents, and the cars ran on their own steel rails from 1905 to 1909. The Scenic Railway operation to Lake Pinto differed significantly from the trolley and tracks of the Mineral Wells Electric System. The trolley company served the City and ran some two miles southwest to Elmhurst Park and Lake between 1906 and 1907.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Mosquito  Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas

Mosquito Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1905/1906
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a postcard, reading "Mosquito Street(actually Mesquite Street),Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas." Please note the Chautauqua Theater (1905-1912) at the end of the street. This picture was taken before street car tracks were installed in 1907. Also note the the absence of cars on the street--only horses and buggies.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Texas Carlsbad Well  [1 of 3:  People on Porch]

Texas Carlsbad Well [1 of 3: People on Porch]

Date: 1905?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Texas Carlsbad Well was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. This picture appears to be a promotional advertisement for the pavilion. The name of the well was lettered at the top of the building under the large eaves of the roof. The pavilion was replaced with a brick building, the "New Carlsbad Well' around 1909. Stained glass windows were added to the new pavilion showing a picture of Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water. This picture has been cropped, and the second picture of this image shows more of the outer detail.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3:   People on Porch]

Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3: People on Porch]

Date: 1905?
Creator: unknown
Description: An early picture (probably taken from a newspaper) of the Texas Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. It stood across the street west of the Crazy Well and its first Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The large, two story Second Crazy Pavilion, built adjacent, and to the south of the first one, faced west toward the Carlsbad. The Carlsbad had been replaced by a brick structure by 1909. Stained glass windows were later added to the building that depicted Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water that "Makes a man love HIS wife. "Makes a wife love HER husband, "Robs the divorce court of its business, "Takes the temper out of red-headed people, "Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." (Please see the picture one down, but one, for a better view of it.) This is the second picture of this image. The first one has been cropped, and does not show the outer parts of the picture. The third one is a slightly clearer picture. A colophon on the lower left corner reads: "Evans Photo Min Wells Tex"
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library