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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Lynch Cabins]
A drawing of the Lynch cabins, done by Jarmon Alvis Lynch, grandson of James Alvis Lynch. The drawing says "Alvis Lynch 77" in the bottom right-hand corner. The picture was apparently done from memory. The original mineral water discovery well is in the right foreground, with a windlass for drawing water. "Judge" Lynch and his family did not arrive in Millsap Valley until Christmas 1879. Note the tents in the right background. H. M. Berry, Mineral Wells' first teacher, noted in an article that when the reputation for the curative powers of the water spread, the area looked like "an army on the move" with health-seekers temporarily camping in tents until housing could be built for them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16265/
D. M. Howard Merchant
A view of the D.M. Howard store is shown here. It was located at 101 SE First Avenue. D.M. Howard was one of five brothers to come to Mineral Wells from North Carolina. D.M. Howard died on January 23 (a Saturday), 1910 at his home, following an operation for appendicitis. This building was occupied by J. M. Belcher (a furniture dealer)for many years after it had ceased to be the D.M. Howard store, and then by the R.& W Furniture store. It was eventually torn down in 1975 to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and for parking. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 122. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39185/
D. M. Howard Millinery Department
The D. M. Howard Department Store was once located at 101 SW 1st Street. This photograph illustrates its millinery department. The portly gentleman on the far left has been identified as D. M. Howard himself. The identities of the five ladies, the girl, and the remaining gentleman have not been discovered. If one may judge by the clothes of the people shown in the picture, it is conjectured that the photograph was taken within the first two decades of the twentieth century. Five Howard brothers came from North Carolina to settle in Palo Pinto County. D. M. was the first one to come He later sent for his other brothers. The first Howard buildings were at the northeast corner of Oak & Hubbard Streets, facing Hubbard. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39186/
[A Man, A Woman and a Portrait]
Ruby Shattles (Mrs. Jesse Shattles) presents a portrait of Achilles Corcanges to Mr. Corcanges, founder & owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studios at 412 North Oak. This picture may be found in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39180/
[A Man and a Woman on Donkeys]
Shown here is a rocky, bosky hillside. A man and a woman are both on donkeys; he leans over with a hand on her donkey; five photographer, under veils, catch the scene with cameras. Note that the photographers all wear vests. The clothing of the woman suggests early 20th century. No more is known about this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39242/
[A Man with a Catfish]
An unknown man is pictured holding a catfish that he has presumably caught. An embossed legend at the base of the picture states that the photograph was taken by Young's Photography, Mineral Wells, Texas. (Palo Pinto County held the Texas record in 2005 for a catfish. A ninety-six-pound monster was caught at the outflow of Morris Sheppard Dam on Possum Kingdom Lake.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16256/
[A Man With a plow]
A note on back of photograph states that it shows preparation for paving the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Millsap. The note contains the name D. M. Shrum, but does not indicate that it is the person in the photograph. The brick highway to Millsap was part of the nation's first transcontinental highway, the Bankhead highway, from mile zero in Washington, D.C. to San Diego in California. It was built through Mineral Wells in about 1921. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20459/
A Map of the City of Mineral Wells
A plat of the city of Mineral Wells, prior to 1920. The names of the streets were changed after 1920. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20469/
[A Mayor Being Pushed in a Wheelbarrow]
The visiting Mineral Wells High School football team had just defeated the Weatherford Kangaroos 21 to 6 in their annual football rivalry some time around 1940. The exact date of the event remains unknown as of 2013. Mayor George Barber of Mineral Wells, is enjoying a victor's ride, supplied by the Mayor of Weatherford, across the football field at Weatherford Stadium. The wheelbarrow, used in payment of the wager between rival mayors, is decorated for this purpose. Such whimsical wagering (and the high jinks that accompany the pay-off) is common in Texas High School football. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25080/
Memorial Day Parade 1955
This picture shows a float, sponsored by the State National Bank, that depicts the raising the American flag on the island of Iwo Jima during WWII. The float is passing in front of the Oak Avenue Cafe at the corner of NE 2nd Street and Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The G and A Feed store, pictured in the background, faces NE 2nd Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16291/
[Men and a Woman Around a Microphone]
Five men and a lady are pictured congregating around a microphone. The numbers "5195" are seen obscurely on it. An alert-looking boy in the background holds a musical instrument, as does one of the men. A man in striped pants talks into the microphone. The occasion is entirely unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39248/
[Men on a Trail]
This picture is taken from one of 17 negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug 4, 1975", and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers, and the remark "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) The picture appears to have been taken atop "Welcome" Mountain (East Mountain) in Mineral wells. The structure at the top of the Mountain could be an observation tower that is known to have been erected at this location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20378/
[Men on Horseback and a Horse-drawn Wagon]
Men are shown here,sitting on horses, while another one sits in a wagon in front of the Holt Hardware Store. The sign hanging on the hardware store sign reads "Tin Shop." A sign to the left of the hardware store reads "Saddle and Harness Shop." A note with the picture states "Joe Myers on Left. William Louis Myers in wagon. Father and grandfather of Julia Myers Thompson." "1904" is written on back of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20461/
[Men With Bricks]
Thirty-one men in shirtsleeves, some with straw hats, some in fedoras, all in white shirts, most with ties, each proudly hold up a three-holed brick in front of an undistinguished-looking building that is flanked by a live-oak tree. A van with an obscure legend (perhaps a laundry)stands behind them. The occasion that prompted this photograph remains obscure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39244/
[The Mercer House]
A note on the back of the picture indicates that the Mercer House was built in 1905, and the accompanying description indicates that it was a boarding house operated by Mr. A. S. Mercer and family. The 1909 Polk Directory lists Mssrs. Mercer and Robinson as proprietors. It was located at 210 North Wichita Street [in 2008, NW 1st Avenue], convenient to the leading bath houses, wells, pavilions, and the Mineral Wells Post Office. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20332/
[Mesquite Street]
A picture of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue) looking south is illustrated in this picture. The drug store in the picture is the C. F. Yeager Drugstore on the SE corner of Mesquite Street and NE 1st Street. A bank is also visible at the next corner up from the Yeager Drug which is the SE corner of Mesquite and Hubbard Streets. There are people in the middle of the Street, and several horse drawn vehicles, indicating a parade or demonstration of some sort. Since most of the crowd are ladies in period dress at about the turn of the twentieth century, it could be a demonstration for Womens' Suffrage or the Ladies Temperance League demonstrating for prohibition - no signs or placards are apparent. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20407/
The Methodist-Episcopal Church
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60893/
[The Mineral Wells Annual Fair]
Typewritten on the back of the photograph (probably by A.F. Weaver)is: "We attended the Mineral Wells annual fair at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park." The photograph is probably a copy of an earlier image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20395/
[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. The Convention Hall was built, in part, on the foundation of the Hexagon's DC power plant. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, which was held in 1925. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20474/
Mineral Wells Drug Store
The Mineral Wells Drug was located at 110 N. Mesquite Avenue about 1910. Charles Pollard was the manager. The date of this picture is unknown, but it is conjectured (from the dress of the people pictured) to have been taken in the early twentieth century. Please note the scant electric lighting. Also note the (working?) brass spittoon in front of the cigar display. Customers, presumably having a light meal, are located in the far back. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39190/
[The Mineral Wells Fair of 1908]
Farm products, such as home-canned food items, fresh produce, and plant specimens are displayed here, within the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park at the 1908 Mineral Wells Annual Fair, a Palo Pinto County Fair exhibit. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16306/
[Mineral Wells' First Public School]
Mineral Wells' first public school was erected in 1884, and located on what is now [2008] NW 5th Avenue. The building is now used as a museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20281/
The Mineral Wells Guide
The Mineral Wells Guide, as it itself proclaims, was published for the out-of-town visitor. It contains facts about Mineral Wells, instructions about how to reach Mineral Wells, the water and baths to be found there, the Milling Sanatorium, recreation in the city, and various advertisements. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16339/
Mineral Wells Hardware
The sign painted on the side of the store proclaims that this building is the Mineral Wells Hardware Company. Located at 212 SE 1st Avenue, it was owned by Mssrs. Smith & Frost. It was later bought by L.E. Seaman. In 1975, it became the location of Widlake Motor Supply. The picture appears on page 126 of A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60915/
[Mineral Wells High School]
This photograph was taken at the completion of Mineral Wells High School in 1915. The Mineral Wells Independent School District donated the building to the Fifty Year Club in 2007. The Fifty Year Club intends to restore the school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20238/
[The Mineral Wells High School Band in the Bicentennial Parade]
The Mineral Wells High School Band in the "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade of 1976 (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) is shown here, as taken from a perspective looking northeast at intersection of N. Oak Avenue (Highway 281 left to right) and E. Hubbard Street (Highway 180, one-way right to left.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16148/
[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]
Shown in this picture are, from left to right: Maggie McDaniel, Annabel Cushman, Myra Hunt Oliver and (Valedictorian) Ferdinand "Doc" Howard. The title of his valedictory address was "The Electrical Age." The diplomas were presented by Judge F.C. Highsmith. This photograph is to be found in the second edition of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver on page 189. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20472/
Mineral Wells is 100% for "Ike" Sablosky
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60926/
[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]
An aerial View of Mineral Wells Municipal Airport and Downing Heliport is shown here. Further information about them is not yet available. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39203/
[A Mineral Wells Orchestra]
Shown here is a clipping from a newspaper, showing the Mineral Wells Orchestra, some 65 years previous to its publication. Members are, top row: John Nance, Jeff Reimar, John (last name unknown) and an unidentified mandolin player; middle row is a string guitar quartet consisting of: Mrs. J.E. Johnson, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. P. E. Bock, and an unidentified fourth lady; front row: Mrs. J.D. Cranford, John Muns, an unidentified person (perhaps a trombonist), and Mrs. I. N. Wynn. The clipping was cut short; some information is clearly be missing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20455/
[Mineral Wells Steam Laundry]
The only information available in regard to this photograph is a legend on the back of it that reads: "200 block of NW 7th St." The sign on the false front of the building clearly reads, "Mineral Steam Laundry." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39199/
Mineral Wells, Texas
A pamphlet about the various services and attractions in and around Mineral Wells, Texas, with many photographic illustrations, extols the allurements of Mineral in an effusive nineteenth-century prose, that was probably archaic for the time of the pamphlet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth21925/
MINERAL WELLS TEXAS CARLSBAD WATER
This picture appears to be a label taken from a container of mineral water sold by the Texas Carlsbad Water Company. The label describes the water as "Purgative" and "Diuretic." DIRECTIONS state further: The average person requires from 8 to 12 glasses per day, but there are those who need less, and others for whom this quantity will not suffice. Hence drink such quantity as gives desired effect, be it small or great. One or two glasses taken hot, half hour before breakfast, will be found very effective. The label ends with the legend: This Label Censored [sic] by the Parker-Palo Pinto Co. Medical Society. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39227/
Mineral Wells, "The Carlsbad of America"
Shown here is a booklet about the history of, the various services available at, and the attractions in and around Mineral Wells, ("The Carlsbad of America")Texas. Published in 1905, it contains many photographic illustrations and a local map. Please note the colophon at the bottom of the pamphlet: "An empire--a nation within a nation." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16332/
Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department (Souvenir)
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60970/
[A Mineral Wells Water Cartoon]
Graphic representation of the combined effects of four common mineral concentrations of blended mineral water produced in Mineral Wells, Texas; it shows four bottles spouting water that form a stream of "Health and Happiness" to repel a skeleton (labeled "Disease") and other symbols of medicine (crutches, a wheelchair, and "Patent Medicine" Bottle). A flag over the water jugs says "Mineral Wells, the strongest fort in the world." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38075/
Mineral Wells Yesterday And Today
The caption to this picture indicates that there are two of them, taken from a common vantage point. This photograph dates from June, 1895, and it was taken from under the original Welcome sign. The view is to the southwest. The Methodist Church (the large white church with steeple) is in the foreground near the lower left corner. Above it, and slightly to its right (near the left edge and middle foreground), is an old two-story stone building which was occupied by the Bank of Mineral Wells. The second photograph, of Mineral Wells in a later time, is unfortunately not provided. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20393/
[A Mini-Park]
The women of Mineral Wells beautified the town by planting vacant lots. This "Mini-park" was located in the 200 block of Hubbard Street, and is now [2008]a parking lot adjacent to Murray's Grill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20464/
[A Minstrel Show Program]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60965/
Minutes of the Bicentennial Committee
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60937/
[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]
Illustrated here is picture of a model of the Hexagon Hotel (and the only living daughter of David Galbraith, Elizabeth Sickels) that was taken about 1977. The model is now located in the Mineral Wells Historical Association's Rock School House. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20480/
Montgomery Ward & Co.
The front of the photograph obviously reads: Montgomery Ward & Co. A hand-written legend reads: Mineral Wells, Texas Aug 24th 1929 The back reads: North Oak Ave. Built in 1929 Copyright A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39178/
Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]
A view of Moore Street (now NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16284/
Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells
This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20225/
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]
A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20473/
[The Murphy Family]
A scene of children sitting in horse-drawn carriage, with a man leaning against the carriage house is illustrated here. A family home is shown in the background, with chickens, and a cow in the foreground. Information on back of photograph states "Looking west. Back of Murphy Home on East Mountain." Murphy was a builder in Mineral Wells with the firm of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors. They built many of the buildings in the early part of the 1900's, including Mineral Wells High School (1915), Bimini Bath House, and the Norwood Hospital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20230/
[The Murphy Home]
A picture taken of the Murphy home about, taken the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The home underwent several renovations during Mr. Murphy's residency. The family at the time of this photograph consisted of two adults and three children. The home is located on East Mountain, and can be seen from most of North Oak Avenue. It was later known as the Brewer home. Mr. Murphy, a contractor, built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School and the second First Baptist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20248/
[Newspaper Special - Rotary Convention, 1922]
A special "Rotary photogravure" edition for the Rotary Club Convention, Mineral Wells, that took place in 1922. The edition carries a panoramic view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, and pictures of twenty Rotary officials and Convention Committee Chairmen. George Holmgren, District Governor (third from left), had Mineral Wells' WELCOME sign built in his San Antonio Iron Works, and donated it to the people of Mineral Wells that year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25077/
[The North Entrance to Elmhurst Park]
The entrance to Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells is shown here. The number "7830" in the upper left portion of the picture remains unexplained. The park was a recreational spot for the resort city. The park was closed in 1913, when trolley service was discontinued for lack of customers. As a direct result, the casino no longer exists, being also a casualty of the state's reform of gambling laws. It is now the site of the city sewage disposal facility. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16312/
North Front of Old School House
A north (side) view of the West Ward School, Mineral Wells' first High School. Built in 1902, located at 205 NW 5th Avenue, north of and on the same property as the old Rock School. The school served as both a High School and Elementary school until the East Ward School was built in 1906. When Mineral Wells High School was built in 1915, the West Ward name was changed to Houston Elementary School. It was torn down when a new Houston School was built in 1930. A note on the back of this photograph states "From Howard Album." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25074/