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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 24, Ed. 1 Friday, December 8, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601246/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 23, Ed. 1 Friday, December 1, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601211/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 22, Ed. 1 Friday, November 24, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601222/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 21, Ed. 1 Friday, November 17, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601270/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 20, Ed. 1 Friday, November 10, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601220/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 19, Ed. 1 Friday, November 3, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601265/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 19, Ed. 1 Friday, November 3, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417303/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 18, Ed. 1 Friday, October 27, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601229/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 18, Ed. 1 Friday, October 27, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417286/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 17, Ed. 1 Friday, October 20, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601227/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 16, Ed. 1 Friday, October 13, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601228/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 15, Ed. 1 Friday, October 6, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601224/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 14, Ed. 1 Friday, September 29, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601189/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 13, Ed. 1 Friday, September 22, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601212/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 12, Ed. 1 Friday, September 15, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601181/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 13, Ed. 1 Friday, September 15, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417287/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 11, Ed. 1 Friday, September 8, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601201/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 10, Ed. 1 Friday, September 1, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601233/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 9, Ed. 1 Friday, August 25, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601197/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 8, Ed. 1 Friday, August 18, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601248/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 7, Ed. 1 Friday, August 11, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601183/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 6, Ed. 1 Friday, August 4, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601184/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 5, Ed. 1 Friday, July 28, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601230/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 4, Ed. 1 Friday, July 21, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601199/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 3, Ed. 1 Friday, July 14, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601182/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 2, Ed. 1 Friday, July 7, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601202/
The Longhorn (Camp Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 4, No. 1, Ed. 1 Friday, June 30, 1944
Weekly newspaper from Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army personnel at Camp Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth601262/
[A Program for "Lazy Town", an Opera in Two Acts]
A program for "Lazy Town - An Opera in Two Acts", presented by Sam Houston School on May 14, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16353/
[A Program for "Sunny of Sunnyside"- - an Operetta]
A program for "Sunny of Sunnyside - An Operetta", presented at the Travis School Auditorium on April 29-30, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16352/
A Program for the "Victory Queen" and "Victory on the Home Front"
A program for The Victory Queen and Victory on the Home Front, presented by Mineral Wells High School at the Convention Hall on March 8, 1943. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16354/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 66, No. 6, Ed. 1 Friday, July 31, 1942
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417304/
Crazy Paper Box Company
The Crazy Water Company built a plant in 1919 to extract minerals from its water, box the crystals, and sell them nationwide as Crazy Water Crystals. Part of the crystal enterprise included a box factory. Following an action by the Food and Drug Administration in the late 1930's, crystal operations were reduced and box operation was diversified. On the back of the photograph is written "'Treetop' Erwin, left, was the driver of the Crazy Box Company truck." The photograph is dated 1940, and can be found in A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1974, on page 28. Special note: By magnifying the picture so as to be able to read the license plate of the truck, the date "42" becomes visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25065/
Standard [Well and Amusement Park]
Formerly the Vichy Well, it was re-named the Standard Well and Amusement Park. Note the large mineral water bottle sign in the lower right hand corner of the picture. The building was torn down during World War II, and replaced by USO Club. The North Oak Community Center is at this location as of 2008. Information about it was taken from A.F. Weaver "Time Was" page 67. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29819/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
This is a view from a spot near the dam looking across the lake to Ed Dismuke's Famous Water Company, where mineral water was piped to his drinking pavilion on NW 3rd Street. It was here also, that the Famous crystallizing plant, where "Pronto Lax" crystals were made, was located. Lake Pinto supplied water to the City of Mineral Wells from the time of its creation in 1902, until Rock Creek was dammed to form Lake Mineral Wells in Parker County in 1918, and completed in September of 1920. This photograph is taken from one of 17 (4X4) negatives in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds, addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20380/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 1 of 4, Flood Stage]
Lake Mineral Wells, Mineral Wells State Park, is shown here in flood stage. Heavy spring rains dumped 7.2 inches of rainfall into the area over a violent week-end in March 1976, resulting in a flood that claimed 24 lives in fire- and water-related incidents. The dam is visible on the far left side of the picture, with water flowing over it. Flood waters cover a large part of the land between the photographer and the dam. The public boat ramp and fueling station are on the peninsula at the far right side of the picture. The picture is part of a group of films labeled "1977", but related news articles give the date as March of the previous year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29919/
Panorama of Camp Wolters, TX
This picture is a panoramic photograph of Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas, the largest infantry replacement center in 1941. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Target Range, Regimental Area No. 4, Dental Clinic,Guest House, Service Club, Theater, Regimental Area No. 3, Infantry Replacement Center/Headquarters Area, Regimental Area No. 6, Warehouse Area, Corps Area Service Command and Hospital Area, Regimental Area No. 2, Regimental Area No. 1, and Machine Gun Range. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16323/
[Firing and Deflection Conversion Tables]
This document (FT 81 B3, abridged) consists of two pages, each with a separate table. The first table is a chart that shows range and elevation for firing particular mortar shells. The second page includes a chart with range and deflection (presumably for the same kind of shells), as well as notes which give additional instructions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46561/
[The Baker Hotel at Night]
This picture shows the Baker--in its great days--at night. Legend has it that a female guest jumped to her death. Her ghost is supposed to be resident in the building, but substantial evidence for the existence of the ghost remains to this date [2014] lacking. A legend on the front of the photograph states that it was colorized by A. F. Weaver in 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39155/
[The Building of Camp Wolters]
An automobile--presumably of the late 1930's--is parked by a building in the process of being built. Workmen may be seen at the site. A legend under the original reads: "Buildings seem to literally spring from the earth when the construction of the then Camp Wolters began in November, 1940. The camp was completed in less than four months and became the nation's largest infantry Replacement Training Center. Construction cost was approximately $14,200,000." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60911/
[The Crazy Bottling Plant]
The Crazy Water Bottling Plant and Crazy Water Tower are shown here. The plant was built in 1919 at a cost of $85,000, and is located at 300 NW 7th Street. The location was once the original site of the Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Pavilion. The Sangcura-Sprudel Pavilion was moved and converted into a rooming house, which burned in 1973. Notice the home in the background. The date on back of photograph is given as 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29968/
[The Crazy Crystal Bottling Plant]
A picture of the interior of the Crazy Bottling Plant, ladies are shown bottling Crazy Fiz, a copyrighted beverage created by infusing cooled mineral water with carbon dioxide. The men shown here appear to be checking the process in preparation for the bottling of the Crazy Fiz, while the ladies bottle and crate the finished product for shipment. Note the plant's scrupulous cleanliness, and the fact that all employees are dressed in white. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29960/
[The Crazy Gang Bus]
A radio show, broadcast at noon and advertising Crazy Water Crystals over the Texas Quality Network, became so popular that the radio gang found themselves in great demand for personal appearances. To accommodate their audiences, the band traveled in their own bus, shown here. On the back of the photograph is stamped "A. F. Weaver Photography 412 N.Oak Avenue Mineral Wells, Texas 76067." Dated: 1940. Please note: ZIP codes were not in existence in 1940. Its appearance here with the date of 1940 cannot be easily explained. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29973/
[The Crazy Hotel Pavilion]
A handwritten note on the back of the picture identifies this as "Crazy Hotel Pavilion 1940 Cigar Stand and Shine Stand." Please notice Leon Cross, the "shoe-shine boy", who operated the stand for years, in the white shirt to the left of the Shine Stand. This pavilion is off the hotel lobby, behind and west of the elevators of the second Crazy Hotel. A fire started March 15, 1925, in the drugstore next to the bath house of the first Crazy Hotel which adjoined the Crazy Flats (second Crazy Pavilion). The fire destroyed all the businesses in this city block. The second Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and incorporated all of the previous enterprises into one building covering the entire city block. The drinking bar, from which Boyce Ditto served mineral water for many years, is at the opposite end of the pavilion, left of the shoe-shine and Cigar Stand, with its striped awning. In its heyday during the health-spa era of the "City built on Water," the bar served four different strengths of mineral water. The bar is still in existence today although inactive. The mezzanine around the drinking pavilion was lined with offices, primarily those of doctors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29444/
[The Crazy Laundry]
In the 1930's, the Carlsbad Building (once a spa for taking the mineral waters. See "The Texas Carlsbad" for details)was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for use as a laundry. Note the painted windows that still proclaim the waters, and the original Texas Carlsbad building. The Panel truck in front was driven by L. C. Ely and the other truck was driven by his father R. C. Ely. This picture was taken sometime in 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39226/
[The Crazy Water Crystal Factory]
Shown here is an interior view of the Crazy Crystals Plant. "Crazy Water" was evaporated, and the dissolved solids precipitated as crystals which were then packaged and shipped all over the United States, Canada, England and Australia. By dissolving the Crazy Water crystals in water, the purchaser was able to reconstitute "mineral water" and secure the benefits of one of the earliest "instant" beverages without the added cost of the supplying company's shipping water. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29965/
[Mineral Wells High School]
This view of Mineral Wells High School, taken from the east in 1940, shows the 1884 "Little Rock School House" (Mineral Wells' first public school) on the north side of the high school. The larger school was built at 101 NW 5th Avenue in 1915. The second high school in Mineral Wells, it still [2008] stands. Three other high schools have been built since the last class graduated from this one in 1955. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25051/
[The Sunshine Special]
A locomotive engine pulls the Texas & Pacific "Red Eye" passenger train, named The Sunshine Special. These business-friendly trains were scheduled to arrive in the Dallas/Ft Worth area at about 9 AM from both the east and the west. This picture was taken by A.F. Weaver at Millsap, Texas in 1940. It was published in the Rotogravure section of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The 700- (714-) series engine shown was replaced a few years later by larger, more powerful Series 600 engines capable of greater speed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16248/
[The Mineral Wells High School Marching Band]
The Mineral Wells High School marching band is shown here performing on a football field in the late 1930's. The band director at that time was Mr. Dave Brunswick. See also "Mineral Wells High School Concert Band." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16347/
[The Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church]
This picture, showing Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church, was taken approximately in 1938. The church, pictured here, shows a later second story to the building on the side of the church proper. It is known to be the second Methodist church on the site. Older photographs of its predecessor are at this time [2014] lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39158/
Crazy Park Entrance
Shown here is the entrance to Crazy Park, Mineral Wells, Texas, a picture taken in 1938. This park was earlier a part of the Gibson Pavilion and Park in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. It was located a block south of the Crazy Water Crystals plant, built in 1919. The property now [2008] belongs to, and is occupied by, the First Christian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29451/