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[Sllew La Renim]

[Sllew La Renim]

Date: 1913
Creator: unknown
Description: The caption on page 118 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" (first edition, 1974) by A. F. Weaver, states: "The "SLLEW La RENIM Club was 'Mineral Wells' spelled backwards. The members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers." The ladies of the time used parasols to shade themselves from the sun. (There are seven ladies in the picture, but only six are identified. As deduced from the notes on the back of the picture, Mary Lee Hayes is believed to be the third lady in line in the picture.) The Mineral Wells Sanitarium, originally known as The Exchange Hotel, is shown in the upper left of the picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[D. W. Griffith]

[D. W. Griffith]

Date: 1929
Creator: unknown
Description: D. W. Griffith is shown standing on the roof of the new Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927 and replaced the First Crazy Hotel which had burned in 1925. Mr. Griffith, who produced silent movies including the "Keystone Kops" comedies, and the classic film "Birth of a Nation", was a guest at the Crazy Hotel while visiting Mineral Wells in 1929. A commemorative postage stamp was issued in his honor on May 27, 1975. Mr. Griffith was impressed by the "WELCOME" sign on East Mountain (the world's largest non-commercial, electrically-lighted sign at the time). He developed the "HOLLYWOOD HILLS" addition with other partners when he returned to California, and he erected what is probably the most recognizable landmark in America: The HOLLYWOOD sign in Los Angeles. Both signs have survived similar difficult times in their histories. This picture appears on page 19 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, 1974.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Farm House]

[A Farm House]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A color photograph of a farmhouse in Palo Pinto County is illustrated here. The exact date of the picture is unknown. This one was found among other photographs taken in Thurber, so the locale shown may have been found there. Please note the red soil, which characteristically forms over limestone. Its typical of the county.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

Date: 1912?
Creator: unknown
Description: Mineral Wells had an early horse-drawn fire wagon, pulled by two white horses (named Joe and Frank) and driven by a man named Cogdell. This picture is included on page 189 of the Second Edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", by A. F. Weaver. The city's first fire station was located at 202 N. Oak Avenue, but the horses had difficulty responding to emergency calls from this fire station because the fire wagon's wheels tended to get trapped in the street car tracks that ran down the center of Oak Avenue, which was not paved at that time. This fire was in the central business district (note the roofs of two multistory buildings, visible at the upper left edge of the picture.) Fire hoses laid along the street are being used by two men in the left middle background to furnish water to fight the fire. The location of this particular fire is not specified, but is probably the Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas.) Mineral Wells has experienced several disastrous fires in the past; one in 1914, two blocks west of the Delaware' location, destroyed six city blocks.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Thurber Smokestack and Related Buildings]

[The Thurber Smokestack and Related Buildings]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Thurber, Texas: A dirt road meets another road in distance; a smoke stack stands in distance; a red fire-house with white roof shows to left. A building, in the far left, now [2008] houses the eponymous Smokestack Cafe. An historic plaque can be seen at the base of the smokestack, but it cannot be read from this photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The First Motorcycle in Mineral Wells]

[The First Motorcycle in Mineral Wells]

Date: 1908
Creator: unknown
Description: A caption, taken from "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, on page 116 states: "Pictured in 1908 is Frank Richards, owner of the first motorcycle bought in Mineral Wells. D. C. Harris owned the second motorcycle." Frank Richards was the manager of the Star Well during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular health spa resort, and the boy on the motorbike with him has been identified as his son, Robert Frank Richards. D. C. Harris was the postmaster, and served as Mayor of the city at one time.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Marina on Possum Kingdom Lake]

[A Marina on Possum Kingdom Lake]

Date: August 11, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a view of Possum Kingdom Lake, at possibly Harmar Harbor, showing one of its many marinas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Carlsbad Well Building]

[The Carlsbad Well Building]

Date: 1909?
Creator: unknown
Description: The caption of this 1909 photograph that occurs on page 63 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, notes "...the stained glass windows had not been installed as yet and the "Ben Hur" street car tracks were still running in front of the building." (The Mineral Wells Scenic Railway--the Ben Hur Line to Lake Pinto--ceased operation in 1909, but rails were removed later, probably in conjunction with paving City Streets in 1914.) One of the earlier drinking pavilions, The Carlsbad was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the Crazy Water drinking pavilion. The Crazy Flats Rooming house--which replaced the Crazy Drinking Pavilion--along with the First Crazy Hotel complex--burned in 1925, and were replaced by the current Crazy Hotel, covering the entire block. The hotel opened in 1927. The Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel in the 1930's, and it was used as a laundry.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]

[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]

Date: August 11, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of part of Possum Kingdom Lake from Observation Point, taken August 11, 1974. Although it is not readily visible, the Morris Sheppard Dam, which impounds the Brazos River to form Possum Kingdom Lake, is on the far right edge of the picture. The view is from a vantage point approximately 150 feet above the water, which in its turn is approximately 190 feet deep at this point.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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