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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
 County: Palo Pinto County, TX
Inside a Howard Department Store
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60917/
The Bank of Mineral Wells
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60922/
The Original Baptist Church Building at SW 4th Avenue
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60897/
Minutes of the Bicentennial Committee
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60937/
[The D. M. Howard Store]
A photograph taken during the construction of the D. M. Howard Store, located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. D. M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive in Mineral Wells. He built the first large department store(s) here. This was the first in a complex of Howard Brothers stores, and later housed the J. M. Belcher Furniture Store and its successor, R. & W. Furniture. Howard himself departed this life in 1910. The building was torn down in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20236/
The Fairfield Hotel
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60885/
[Children With Bicycle and Hoop,]
Dated "Jan 10, 1919", this picture was contained in an envelope postmarked "Aug. 4 '75", and addressed to A. F. Weaver Photography from Charles W. [Windell] Simonds. Handwriting on the envelope indicates it was from a short-wave "Ham' radio operator correspondent and friend of Mr. Weaver. Notes on the envelope indicate the picture was probably taken by the correspondent's father, Clarence Winfield Simonds. The sign on the tree at the left edge of the picture indicates this was the Vance Villa (Rooming House) in a residential part of town. (Vance Villa is listed in the 1914 City Director of Mineral Wells at 811 N. College, which is now NW 5th Avenue.) Note the hoop held by the child on the left, while the boy on the right appears to be holding a unicycle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29457/
[Crazy Water Company Railroad Cars]
Men are shown here loading boxes of Crazy Crystals onto railroad boxcars. Crazy Water Crystals were shipped nationwide in response to demand created by radio advertising. This scene is typical of the activity required to load boxcars to meet the demand for "instant Mineral Water." Printed on back of the photograph is: "Loading Crazy Crystals 1930." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29972/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 7 of 15: With Display Case, Drawers Open]
Will Poston stands in the sewing department of his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). The display case is open to show the different types and colors of sewing thread in stock. Colored threads were separated from white for easier selection, and both were available in various brands, spooled quantities and thread sizes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29937/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 12 of 15: Inside View of his Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, preparing to dispatch a container to his cashier's department. A view of the boot department, with a typical stock of Western boots, is displayed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29946/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 14 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston surveys the domain in his store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The photograph was taken about 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29947/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 5 of 15: View of Safe]
Will Poston sits next to the safe in Poston Dry Goods store in 1975. Note the lettering on the safe "Baker, Poston and Co." Also note the many ledger books, which contained the numerous accounts and records required by the store's manual bookkeeping system, around Mr. Poston. Poston's was the largest apparel store in Mineral Wells after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the glass show cases in Poston's had come from the earlier Howards' store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29940/
[Piano Recital, 6 of 10]
This picture was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." The photograph seems to be of a registration table at a piano recital featuring Mrs. Ramsey. The table in the background contains art work. Other pictures in this series indicate that an art show was held in conjunction with the piano recital. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29436/
Texas Carlsbad Water
The first building for the Texas Carlsbad Well, one of the early mineral water wells which brought tourists to Mineral Wells is shown here. This picture appears on page 62 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, who dates it around 1895. Weaver includes a bit of advertising by Texas Carlsbad Mineral Water, "Makes a man love his wife, Makes a wife love her husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24982/
Texas Carlsbad Water
A group of people stand outside Texas Carlsbad Water. The Carlsbad was one of the earlier, and more popular drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells. It was located on NW 1st. Avenue, at NW 4th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Well. Its slogan was: Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a woman love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders. Please note the supports for possible electric lines, the unpaved street, and the horses obscurely visible at the far right of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25108/
[Swimming at Lovers Retreat]
Individuals are shown boating and swimming in Eagle Creek at Lovers Retreat, four miles west of Palo Pinto. The large swimming/fishing area of the creek is separated from the beautiful picnic area to the south of the creek (and to the right in the photograph), and also from a spectacular boulder field north of the creek. A suspension foot-bridge spanned Eagle Creek in this area. This view is from the suspension bridge, looking east on Eagle Creek. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25093/
Texas Carlsbad Well
The Texas Carlsbad Well, 415 N.W. 1st Avenue is illustrated, this picture taken about around 1908. This first Carlsbad pavilion was directly across N.W. 1st Avenue, west of the second Crazy well pavilion. The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway ran down N.W. 1st Avenue between the two pavilions from 1905 to 1909 providing service each 1/4 hour to Lake Pinto. The "Ben Hur" gasoline-powered motor cars were the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars" in service on the tracks that are visible in this picture. This picture can be found on page 82 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS ... ", first edition. A second pavilion, a modern brick structure, was added in 1909 and the original wooden building was later removed. The second pavilion was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning during World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24969/
Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3: People on Porch]
An early picture of the Texas Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. It stood across the street west of the Crazy Well and its first Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The large, two story Second Crazy Pavilion, built adjacent, and to the south of the first one, faced west toward the Carlsbad. The Carlsbad had been replaced by a brick structure by 1909. Stained glass windows were later added to the building that depicted Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water that "Makes a man love HIS wife. "Makes a wife love HER husband, "Robs the divorce court of its business, "Takes the temper out of red-headed people, "Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." This is the second picture of this image. The first one has been cropped, and does not show the outer parts of the picture. The third one is a slightly clearer picture. A colophon on the lower left corner reads: "Evans Photo Min Wells Tex" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24978/
Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is another picture of the Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas. The Carlsbad was one of the early mineral water drinking pavilions in "the city built on water," located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad was on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway Line. Gasoline-powered trolleys, known as the "Dinky Cars", operated at 15-minute intervals between Mineral Wells and Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1909. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24987/
Texas Carlsbad Well [3 of 3: People on Porch]
The Texas Carlsbad Well, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, was one of the early mineral water wells in Mineral Wells. It was located directly across the street, and west of the first Crazy Water Well drinking pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad Pavilion is prominent in several pictures taken in 1908, but this structure was demolished and replaced with a brick structure in 1911. This picture is slightly cropped but it is slightly sharper in certain areas than the previous two pictures. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24990/
Texas Carlsbad Well [1 of 3: People on Porch]
The Texas Carlsbad Well was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. This picture appears to be a promotional advertisement for the pavilion. The name of the well was lettered at the top of the building under the large eaves of the roof. The pavilion was replaced with a brick building, the "New Carlsbad Well' around 1909. Stained glass windows were added to the new pavilion showing a picture of Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water. This picture has been cropped, and the second picture of this image shows more of the outer detail. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24979/
Standard Park
The Standard Park not only had a swimming pool, but a movie theater and dancing pavilion for the entertainment of health-seekers. A trolley to it operated at 600 North Oak Street from 1907 to 1913. (Note the Kingsley Hotel above and left of the Standard, built into the side of East Mountain--later destroyed by fire.) First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, then later as the Beach, the Standard+ was torn down in World War II; and a USO Club was built here for soldiers at Camp Wolters. The USO building was given to the city after the war, and renamed the North Oak Community Center. The Crazy Water Festival Committee is currently [2003] attempting to restore the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24956/
Sewerage Disposal Plant
Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25102/
Stamps & Phillipt [sic] Demonstrating Their Automobile
Stamps and Phillips, inventors, demonstrating their Storm Alarm invention. Note that "Phillips" is spelled with one "l" and a "t" on the hand-written caption. The car is sitting in front of the second Carlsbad drinking pavilion on W. Watts Street (now NW 4th Street.) The photograph was taken during the 1920's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20413/
Standard Park [and Amusement Park]
The Trolley goes by Standard Park and Standard Pavilion around 1913. A popular place,the Standard had a swimming pool, amphitheater, dancing and playgrounds. The North Oak Community is now at this location. Information was taken from A.F Weaver's "Time Was" second edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29823/
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Drinking Pavilion was originally located at 800 NW Second Avenue. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, the porches enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The Crazy Water bottling plant was built on this site in 1919. The rooming house that was the former Sangcura-Sprudel drinking Pavilion burned on December 5, 1973, just five minutes before Mineral Wells' annual Christmas Parade was scheduled to start. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24970/
[West Ward School]
This photograph appears to have been given to A. W. Weaver with the following information on the back of it: "Wasn't it Whittier who said 'Still stately stands the old school house, beside the babbling brook'?--well this one no longer stands. It was a firm & strong old building when they tore it down 4 years ago. I thought you would cherish this picture as a fond recollection of yours, mine & Hugh's school days & days of happy childhood, where, as we romped & played barefoot in the soft sands & green grass, we were not as yet familiar with the hidden stones & thorns that one encounters down the highway of life. "All the sheet metal contained in the top of this building including the tin roof was made & fabricated by Papa in Grandpa's store. The metal work consists of the ornamental cornice fittings, the steeples at each corner of the building, metal banisters on the roof top, pinnacles around cupolas, flag pole with large metal ball on top & all drain piping and roof ventilators. "The barren oak trees in the yard are very familiar. Far to the right, not shown in the picture were several mesquite trees, whose limbs were platted & tied in knots when they were saplings, by Grandpa Caylor. The trees grew in the fantastic shapes. All school boys were mystified at the strange shape of the trees and Grandpa was amused." The school was located at 205 NW 5th Ave. It is both interesting and amazing how much of our history is not evident in the pictures that preserve such a vital part of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20214/
We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas
This is a picture that was found in Mr. Weaver's collection, and captioned "We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas." This type of advertising was used by most of the drinking pavilions in this popular health resort to tout the beneficial effects of Mineral Wells' waters. There were numerous testimonials attesting the truth of such claims. When the Food and Drug Administration began to enforce the nation's drug laws vigorously in the mid- 1930's, however, there were no rigorous scientific test data to document such claims or to warn of possible side effects that taking the mineral water might bring about. Consequently, this sort of advertising was banned after the 1930's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38081/
View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain Showing Crazy Hotel & Nazareth Hospital
A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, looking West-Northwest is shown here. The Crazy Hotel is visible in the near-left part of the picture, and the Nazareth Hospital in the middle-left, a block Northwest of the Crazy The Norwood Clinic (with its stately white columns), a block northeast of the Nazareth, is located near the center of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29450/
[Two Women in Wylie Park]
Two women are pictured strolling in Wylie Park. Notes on back of the photograph read: "Corner of N. Oak and N.E. 1st Street, the West side of Wylie Park, a popular place for strolling." N. Oak Avenue is in background, with North to the right in the picture. Hazelwood Drugs is on the west side of Oak Ave, opposite the park. Mineral Wells. The streets of Mineral Wells were paved in the summer of 1914. A wagon can be seen traveling north on Oak Avenue. What appears to be a work crew may be seen at the corner indicates that the finishing touches may have been in the process of being applied to the paving as the picture was taken. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20441/
Vichy Well Natatorium
An off-season picture of the Vichy Well Natatorium, located in the 600 block of North Oak Avenue, where North Oak Community Center now [2008] stands. The picture dates to around 1900. The Vichy well featured a swimming pool, which it labelled a "Natatorium." Later improvements, when the name was changed to The Standard Well, included a motion-picture theater and a pavilion for dancing. (Note the Dr. A.W. Thompson residence and the Mineral Wells Sanitarium on the right skyline.) A USO was built on this location In World War II for white servicemen at Camp Wolters. The USO building was turned over to the city at the end of the war, and became known as the North Oak Community Center. Preservation efforts are underway [in 2008] to restore the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24968/
Texas Carlsbad Water
This photograph illustrates the Texas Carlsbad Well at Mineral Wells, Texas, one of the early drinking pavilions in the "City built on water." It was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. Shown here is an early picture of the Carlsbad, as later views show slight additions and alterations in response to competition among drinking pavilions for business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24986/
Star Well (Winter Scene)
"Winter Scene--Shipping Star Well Water--From Min Wells Texas" The Star Well was located at the northeast corner of the intersection of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue, across the street and north of the Baker Hotel. The telephone building is currently [2008] located there. A "date", handwritten on the bottom right corner of image, reads--possibly--"1899", which would explain the unpaved street and the lack of automobiles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24973/
Sewing Room
The back of the photograph exhibits a note that this picture was copied from the "Burro", which is the Mineral Wells High School yearbook. The "Sewing Room" was a classroom in the Lillian Peek Home Economics building on the grounds of the high school. The Lillian Peek cottage was built by the WPA in 1937, and was the first free- standing house built specifically for Home Economics education in the State of Texas. It was "Current state of the art" when it was completed. The building now houses the Creative Arts Center, and is used by the local Art Club as an art workshop and museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25050/
Standard [Well and Amusement Park]
Formerly the Vichy Well, it was re-named the Standard Well and Amusement Park. Note the large mineral water bottle sign in the lower right hand corner of the picture. The building was torn down during World War II, and replaced by USO Club. The North Oak Community Center is at this location as of 2008. Information about it was taken from A.F. Weaver "Time Was" page 67. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29819/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 18 of 18, Architectural Close Up View of Steeple]
Looking vertically up the gable at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25018/
"Where the Famous Crystals Are Made"
This is a photograph of a building with a sign that says, "Famous Mineral Wells Crystal Plant." There is a hill, covered in trees, behind the building. Writing at the bottom of the image reads: "Where Famous Crystals Are Made." Ed Dismuke, a drugist from Waco, came to Mineral Wells for his health after his family physician told him he only had a "short time" to live. After miraculously regaining his health, which he credited to the mineral waters of his new hometown, he sold water by the drink at the Damron Hotel, later opening his own company, The Famous Water Company. He also opened The Famous Mineral Crystal Plant on the east side of Lake Pinto in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith. The two also organized The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway with its two gasoline-powered "dinky cars" named "Esther" and "Susie" after Smith's daughters. This is a picture of the plant where Famous Crystals, labeled "Pronto Lax" were made. Dismuke had outlived the doctors who had told him he only had a short time to live when he died at the age of ninety-four. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24961/
[Pole Vaulting at Elmhurst Park]
Information on the back of the photograph states: "Games (pole vaulting) at Elmhurst Park two miles southwest of Mineral Wells where [the] sewage treatment plant is now located. Picture taken around 1910." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20312/
[Paving East Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells]
A group of men work on paving East Hubbard street in Mineral Wells. Electrical lines are present. Street paving in Mineral Wells began in 1914. On the right is the Richards House. Behind the house is Lamar Flats water pavilion, now [2008]the site of the Baker Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16288/
Our City
A photograph, taken from Welcome Mountain looking West down NW 4th Street, of unknown date is illustrated here. The small brick building in 4th Street is the Crazy Well. The first Crazy Water Hotel (left middle of picture) was built on same location as present Crazy Water hotel. The present hotel is much larger and extends to the Crazy Well. Note the Crazy Flats (drinking pavilion with apartments) in foreground. Note the first Catholic Church, on West Mountain. The West Ward School and the High School are in upper left quadrant of picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16225/
Oak Street , Looking South
We have here a picture of Oak Street, looking South. The Poston Company and the Palace Saloon are easily visible in photograph. The wording "Fishburn Dallas" appears on the photograph. The unpaved street, several horses and wagons in picture date the picture to an era before 1914, when the street was paved. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16282/
[Women in a Decorated Car]
Five females ("Aunt Matie, Edith Preston, Lena, and two of Edith's friends", a legend states on the back)) in a decorated car outside the Western Union Telegraph office. Signs on and by the building read "Crazy Well Flats and Modern Rooms", "Cigars", and "Western Union Telegraph and Cable Office." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16358/
On the Broadway of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas
The title on the Picture states, "On The Broadway Of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas." This picture shows a section of the Bankhead Highway, looking east where the main road to Millsap descends from the mountain on which the Mineral Wells Airport stands. Once identified as part of US Highway 281 south of town [Mineral Wells], it overlooks much of the scenery viewed from "Observation Point",at one time called one of the most scenic vistas in the state. The Bankhead Highway was America's first transcontinental highway, starting at Mile Zero on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D. C. It terminated in San Diego, California, and was named for Senator John Hollis Bankhead, head of the Good Roads Movement. It was once labeled "The Broadway of America." The road was approved by Congress in 1916, but construction was delayed by World War I. Hundreds of miles were built in the 1920's when it crossed Palo Pinto County. Mineral Wells' main streets, Hubbard Street and SE 6th Avenue were part of the Bankhead Highway. Hollis Bankhead was the grandfather of Broadway Actress, Tallulah Bankhead. His brother ran a Drugstore in Gordon, Texas, with the proud motto: "The best is none too good for our customers." The drugstore also advertised, "Everything from the cradle to the grave", selling products ranging from baby food to coffins. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16302/
Woodman of the World Camp Meeting , June 19, 1947
A white-ink legend on the face of this photograph reads: Woodman [sic] of the World Camp Meeting----6-19-47 Mineral Wells, Texas. phillips [sic] photographic [sic] Service [sic] A typed legend on the back of the photograph reads: WOW MEETING 6-19-47 held in Convention Hall. Recognized Front [sic] row from left: #1 Ezra Wortham. #5 Charlie Sheridan, #6 George Oliver 3rd. Row standing #1 John Birdwell, #5 Louis Fryer, #6 John Miller, #7 Ben Yeager, #12 Bill Teichman. 4th row: #1 Charlie Langley #15 Roy Langley [Unreadable deletions in green ink above appear this caption] This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39237/
Oak Street, Looking South
This picture shows the 100 block of what is now N. Oak Avenue, looking south. The "Palace Saloon" sign is still visible in 2008. The Palo Pinto County Courthouse Annex currently [2010] occupies the building that once housed Poston's Dry Goods (just down the street from the Palace Saloon). Please note the absence of trolley tracks--or the festoon of wires required to keep its power-line in place. The unpaved street dates the photograph prior to 1914, and probably prior to the previous picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29808/
Oak Street, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture purports to show North Oak Avenue,(the photograph reads "Oak Street")of Mineral Wells, Texas,in the 100 block--looking north. The Mineral Wells Electric Railway operated from 1907 to 1913, and streets were paved in 1914. Visible are: A horse-drawn hack with passengers, a streetcar, automobiles, numerous people on sidewalks, and businesses along the street. The streetcar (Apparently working on air: The electric line required to power it is nowhere in sight)is passing the Poston Dry Goods store on its right. The Hexagon Hotel (opened December 1897)is possibly visible in the distance. A steeple is barely visible on the skyline at the left (west) side of the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16307/
[Mesquite Street, Looking South]
Shown here is a view of Mesquite Street (Now--2008--NE First Avenue) from its upper end at Coke Street (now NE 2nd Street). Horse-drawn vehicles are present. The building at the left middle of the picture with the "DRUGS" sign and the stone lion statue on its roof is the Yeager Building, home of what was popularly called "The Lion Drug Store." The first building on right, 205 NE First Street (with arched windows) was H. M. Coleman's clothing store for men, which even at this early date, appears to be undergoing renovation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16287/
[Lynch Plaza 3 of 3]
Lynch Plaza, in the center of this picture, is located on the corner of North Oak and East Hubbard Streets. This structure, originally called the Firstron Building, replaced the First National Bank at this location. The bank was located in the northwest corner of the Oxford Hotel. The hotel building, including the bank, was destroyed by fire in 1983. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29857/
Methodist Church - Baker Gardens - East Mountain
This photograph appears to be taken from a picture post-card, which includes the old Methodist Church, the Baker Hotel Garden, the Baker Water Storage Building, and the Welcome Sign on East Mountain. It is a rare view. The home of Druggist Dr. C. F. Yeager on NE 2nd Street in the picture was still standing at the time of this picture. During construction of his Hotel, Mr. Baker visited Hot Springs, Arkansas; and he was so impressed with the Arlington Hotel that he stopped building construction, and moved the hotel a block further west. He converted the basement, already built, into a swimming pool (only the second hotel known to have a pool at the time), and an underground laundry. The Methodist church has since been rebuilt, the water storage building has been removed, and the "Welcome" sign has been relocated further east to greet visitors from its new location overlooking Elmwood Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29980/
[Men and a Woman Around a Microphone]
Five men and a lady are pictured congregating around a microphone. The numbers "5195" are seen obscurely on it. An alert-looking boy in the background holds a musical instrument, as does one of the men. A man in striped pants talks into the microphone. The occasion is entirely unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39248/