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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
 County: Palo Pinto County, TX
[The Crazy Gang Bus]
A radio show, broadcast at noon and advertising Crazy Water Crystals over the Texas Quality Network, became so popular that the radio gang found themselves in great demand for personal appearances. To accommodate their audiences, the band traveled in their own bus, shown here. On the back of the photograph is stamped "A. F. Weaver Photography 412 N.Oak Avenue Mineral Wells, Texas 76067." Dated: 1940. Please note: ZIP codes were not in existence in 1940. Its appearance here with the date of 1940 cannot be easily explained. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29973/
THE CRAZY RADIO GANG
The Crazy Radio Gang broadcast music on the Texas Quality Network Monday through Friday at 12:45 P.M. Pictured are: HAL H. COLLINS "One Man's Opinion", FRANK DINKINS "Dink", FRANCIS QUINN "February", FRANK McCORDIE "Great Lover" JOHNNY JORDAN "Uncle Oscar", CONRAD BRADY Master of Ceremonies, GUY WOODWARD "Curly", MAURICE PENDERY "Brother Pink Nose", DALE WOODWARD "Pee Wee", JACK AMLUNG "Musical Director", SUGAR CANE and February (in black face). Hal Collins was the manager of the Crazy Hotel in the early 1930's when a salesman convinced him that he could sell a boxcar-load of "Crazy Water Crystals" a week if he would advertise them on the new-fangled radio. The broadcasts originated in the lobby of the Crazy Hotel, and became popular beyond all expectations. Orders for the mineral water crystals filled many carloads per week, and they were shipped to all areas of the country. Demand was so great that it exceeded the capacity of the crystallizing plant. A second source of mineral water was found, but it did not match the original patented composition. The company never fully recovered from the heavy fine levied on it by the Food and Drug Administration in the early 1930's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29975/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 7 of 15: With Display Case, Drawers Open]
Will Poston stands in the sewing department of his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). The display case is open to show the different types and colors of sewing thread in stock. Colored threads were separated from white for easier selection, and both were available in various brands, spooled quantities and thread sizes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29937/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 2 of 21: View South/Southeast ]
The Colonial Hotel was built in 1906 by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store on S. Oak at the back of the hotel. The name of the hotel was changed to The Damron Hotel around 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. A hardware store, hard by, was sold to Mr. Holt's manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel, located at 109 W. Hubbbard Street, along with Davidson Hardware, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Please note the Christmas decoration, symbol of the season, on the telephone pole above the fire truck. The main entrance to the hotel is faintly visible through the dense smoke to the rear of the fire truck. The Crazy Hotel can be seen at the lower left edge of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29903/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 9 of 11: Workers]
Workers are shown helping to demolish the First Baptist Church building in 1967. It was built in 1920. The current building is the third First Baptist Church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29907/
Methodist Church - Baker Gardens - East Mountain
This photograph appears to be taken from a picture post-card, which includes the old Methodist Church, the Baker Hotel Garden, the Baker Water Storage Building, and the Welcome Sign on East Mountain. It is a rare view. The home of Druggist Dr. C. F. Yeager on NE 2nd Street in the picture was still standing at the time of this picture. During construction of his Hotel, Mr. Baker visited Hot Springs, Arkansas; and he was so impressed with the Arlington Hotel that he stopped building construction, and moved the hotel a block further west. He converted the basement, already built, into a swimming pool (only the second hotel known to have a pool at the time), and an underground laundry. The Methodist church has since been rebuilt, the water storage building has been removed, and the "Welcome" sign has been relocated further east to greet visitors from its new location overlooking Elmwood Cemetery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29980/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 12 of 15: Inside View of his Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, preparing to dispatch a container to his cashier's department. A view of the boot department, with a typical stock of Western boots, is displayed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29946/
[Crazy Fiz]
Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29971/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 11 of 15: Inside View of Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The picture gives a broad view of the boot department of the Western attire carried by the store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29942/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 4 of 11: The Beginning]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church building was built in the same location. Please see Number 1 in this series for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29912/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 14 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston surveys the domain in his store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The photograph was taken about 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29947/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 4 of 15: Will Poston Holding Cable System]
Will Poston, standing, is poised in preparation to dispatch a container along a cable from the central cashier's office in his store, Poston Dry Goods in 1975. The store was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29951/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 8 of 11: Frame of Building]
The second building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was then demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29908/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 2 of 11: Another Angle]
The first house of worship of the congregation of First Baptist Church, located in the southwest corner of the Crazy Well block, was purchased in 1883 and was used until 1900. The First Baptist Church was re-located to the corner of W. Hubbard and Pecan Street (now SE 4th Avenue) in 1900, and used until 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29914/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 2 of 15: Will Poston Inside His Store]
Will Poston stands at the cashier's station, preparing to dispatch a runner to a clerk in his store, Poston Dry Goods, It was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29957/
[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]
The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29962/
[A District Baptist Meeting]
This is a picture taken by A.F. Weaver during the District Baptist Meeting of 1964, held at the high school football stadium on the west side of town. Miller Stadium, where this photograph was taken, has been replaced by a new one at the High School complex on the east side of town as of March, 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29976/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 3 of 11: East View]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, when it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see Number 1 of this collection for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29913/
Hal Collins
The name "Hal Collins", manager of the Crazy Hotel in the early 1930's, is printed on the back of this photograph, as well as his autograph on the face. He was convinced that by advertising on the new medium, radio, that he could sell a boxcar-load of Crazy Water Crystals each week. As a result, the "Crazy Gang" began broadcasting from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel over the Texas Quality Network. The noon broadcast became so popular that the sponsor was shipping, not one but several, carloads of Crazy Water Crystals per week to a nationwide audience of devoted listeners. Weatherford's Mary Martin got her start in show business on the program where she became known as "Crazy Mary." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29974/
[The Crazy Crystal Bottling Plant]
A picture of the interior of the Crazy Bottling Plant, ladies are shown bottling Crazy Fiz, a copyrighted beverage created by infusing cooled mineral water with carbon dioxide. The men shown here appear to be checking the process in preparation for the bottling of the Crazy Fiz, while the ladies bottle and crate the finished product for shipment. Note the plant's scrupulous cleanliness, and the fact that all employees are dressed in white. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29960/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 10 of 15: Inside View of Store]
A photograph of Will Poston and a cashier inside Poston Dry Goods store, 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. [Will Poston is in cashier's/accountant's office. The cashier is preparing to pull a cord to set the cash trolley system in motion Piles of trousers take up the foreground] A central cashier's stand was what is now known as "state of the art" near the middle of twentieth century. This one was located in a corner of the mens' trousers department. The historic Poston store is now a Mineral Wells annex of the Palo Pinto County courthouse. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29922/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 10 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29906/
[Hell's Gate]
An old channel of the Brazos River cut a gap in a sandstone formation in the Possum Kingdom area. Water from the impounded Possum Kingdom Lake covered the area and created this spectacular scene when the Morris Shepard Dam was built by the W.P.A. for flood control in the late 1930's. For a feel of the magnitude of the vista, please note the two-story home atop the cliff to the right of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25101/
Lovers Retreat
A photograph of a group of three men and four women pose in a hollow surrounded by vegetation. This former public park, on Eagle Creek four miles west of Palo Pinto, is known for the huge vine-covered boulders north of the creek, and for a lovely picnic area bordering the creek on the south side. A low dam near the downstream edge of the park formed a favorite early swimming and fishing area. A small pedestrian suspension bridge provided access to the rugged boulder-strewn playground. A large tabernacle provided venue for Sunday Services at one time, and also for the Palo Pinto County Old Settler's Reunions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25100/
Texas Carlsbad Water
A group of people stand outside Texas Carlsbad Water. The Carlsbad was one of the earlier, and more popular drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells. It was located on NW 1st. Avenue, at NW 4th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Well. Its slogan was: Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a woman love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders. Please note the supports for possible electric lines, the unpaved street, and the horses obscurely visible at the far right of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25108/
[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]
Mineral Wells' first Police Department is shown on horseback here. On the far left is Jim Barrett, Chief, and in the middle is Paul Granbury. The man on the right remains unknown. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", page 153. The picture appears to have been taken at the photographer's souvenir picture stand on the donkey trail about halfway up East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys for the trail; but he was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife took over the photographer's stand. They built a rock house, here as a background, for souvenir pictures. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25000/
[The West Ward School, East (Front) View ]
The West Ward School, Mineral Wells' second public School, was built in 1902. It was located north of the old Rock School at 205 NW 5th Avenue. It served as both a High School and Elementary school until the East Ward School was built in 1906, and High School classes were moved there. The West Ward School was renamed the Houston Elementary School when the Mineral Wells High School was built in 1915. The building was torn down after a new Houston Elementary School was built in 1930. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25075/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 4 of 18: Steeple View Facing East]
One of the gables on the roof of St. Mark's Lutheran church, Mineral Wells is shown here. The gables on both the north and south ends of the church appear to be identical. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25038/
[The Front entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church]
This picture of the main entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church at 300 NW 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, shows the unique dome that topped the picturesque structure. The church survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed about six city blocks surrounding it. Foundation structural damage caused the church to be replaced by a more modern structure in the 1980's. This picture is one of 43 negatives in the A. F. Weaver Collection showing construction details of the Lutheran and Presbyterian churches. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25037/
[First Presbyterian Church, 13 of 13 : South Side]
The third in a series of thirteen pictures of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows details of the south side of the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25009/
[Newspaper Special - Rotary Convention, 1922]
A special "Rotary photogravure" edition for the Rotary Club Convention, Mineral Wells, that took place in 1922. The edition carries a panoramic view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, and pictures of twenty Rotary officials and Convention Committee Chairmen. George Holmgren, District Governor (third from left), had Mineral Wells' WELCOME sign built in his San Antonio Iron Works, and donated it to the people of Mineral Wells that year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25077/
[The Brick Factory]
The abundant clay in and around Palo Pinto County was recognized around the turn of the 20th century as a source of raw material for brick manufacturing. Rejected fine coal from the area's coal mines furnished heat to fire the clay and bake it into brick. This brick factory in far western Parker County, near the Rock Creek coal mine, was a major industry in Mineral Wells. The factory was first opened on January 21 of 1921. The factory is in full operation in this photograph, with train cars on the tracks and bricks stacked along the rail area awaiting shipment. Area-made bricks were used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave both the highway from Mineral Wells to Ft. Worth as well as many of the streets in in that city, and to pave Congress Avenue in Austin. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25058/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 5 of 18: Door Leading to Steeple]
The door at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. It leads to the steeple. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25003/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 9 of 18: Steps in Front of Church]
A view of the roof of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, as seen from the south. This view shows some of the rockwork landscaping on the south side of the church, located at 1201 SE 25th Avenue in Mineral Wells texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25006/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 13 of 18: Curved Wood of Steeple]
A tilted picture of the peak of the gable on the north end of the roof, St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) is shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25036/
[First Presbyterian Church - 1 of 13: Front View]
This photograph is the first in a series of pictures of architectural details that was taken prior to demolition of the Presbyterian church of Mineral Wells. The first church in Mineral Wells built by the Presbyterians in 1883 was located at the southwest corner of what is now the Crazy Hotel block. The early church served both the Presbyterian and Baptist Churches, and was sold to the Baptist congregation. The First Presbyterian Church was built at 300 NW 4th Avenue in 1896, and burned in 1908 This domed structure replaced it. This picture shows the front entrance to the Sanctuary of this second First Presbyterian Church in Mineral Wells, Texas, built in 1909, at this location. This picturesque building survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed the two-by-three city block area surrounding it. The building suffered serious structural deterioration to its foundation, and was replaced in the the 1980's by a more modern structure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25022/
[The Woodmen of the World -- 1905]
Mineral Wells was a popular convention city in its heyday. This photograph is part of the group attending a convention of the Woodmen of the World in Mineral Wells. The picture was taken around 1905 at the Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25086/
[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]
A caption on the back of the photograph states, "This picture, taken in the 1930's, shows the drinking pavilion in the [lacuna] Crazy Hotel." Recognizable are Boyce Ditto, standing third from right; N.E. Adams, last on the right, standing reading a newspaper; and Mrs. Veale, mother of Cecil Young, seated on left. Many people came to Mineral Wells to bathe and to "Drink their way to health" at the many wells and pavilions that catered to the public. This drinking pavilion is still extant, just off the lobby of the "Crazy" (now [2008] a retirement home), but it no longer dispenses mineral water. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25069/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 12 of 18: Close Up of Wood Shingles]
The wooden shingles (shakes) on roof of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas are shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25044/
[The Women's Corps, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense]
The Women's Corp, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense. The photograph pictures 13 (unnamed) women, a young girl, and A. F. Weaver during a flag presentation. Mr. Weaver, a Ham Radio operator, set up the Palo Pinto County Civil Defense on October 1, 1972 and was the director for 26 years. Mr. Weaver was also the author of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", a photographic history, first published in 1975. The book was revised and published again in three subsequent editions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25059/
The 112th Cavalry Band, Mineral Wells, Texas
The writing on the drum identifies this band as being associated with the 112th Cavalry, which was stationed in Mineral Wells, Texas. A National Guard Cavalry unit was established on West Mountain in 1919. This photograph appears to be taken in front of the cavalry stable sometime between World Wars I and II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25070/
[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]
This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25015/
[The Crazy Water Crystals Plant]
One step in the conversion of Mineral Wells' "Crazy Water" into Crazy Water Crystals was to boil mineral water in open vats, in three different stages, until only the minerals were left. One worker is visible, monitoring the open vats. The crystals were then filtered out and dried, packaged and sold nationwide. The customer simply added water to the crystals to obtain one of America's early "instant" products: Mineral Wells' health-giving mineral water. The photograph was taken around 1930. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25079/
[A Public Mineral Water Well]
A picture that was used on the dust cover of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition, 1988 It is identified as "Visitors to Mineral Wells at 'Public Mineral Water Well' around 1910. The picture was furnished by Mrs. Raymond York. On left is Ellie Landry of Dallas. Second from right is Mrs. William Whitehead Gardner of Lawrence, Texas, grandmother of Raymond York of Mineral Wells." There were public drinking fountains in town where free water was available to visitors. This particular fountain's location remains unidentified. This picture appears, superficially, to be a duplicate of the previous one; but closer examination suggests that it is a composite picture, with the background being a painted backdrop. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25046/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 6 of 18: Roof View of Steeple and Building]
St. Mark Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. This picture shows details of the juncture of the roof between the south gable of the sanctuary and the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25017/
Nazareth Hospital 25th Anniversary 1931-1956
We have here a copy of the cover of a booklet marking the 25th anniversary (1931 - 1956) of Mineral Well's Nazareth Hospital. The brochure contains pictures of the religious, medical, nursing and administrative staff, with interior scenes of departments, patients and equipment. The Mineral Wells Clinic was built soon after the current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927 to replace the Crazy Flats that burned in 1925. In 1931 the Holy Sisters of the Nazareth purchased the 46-bed facility for $135,000 and moved into the top floor of the building to live and minister to the patients. The hospital was closed in the mid 'sixties. The hospital was temporarily moved to the Crazy Hotel until the present [2009] hospital was built. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25090/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 11 of 18: Retaining Wall Leading to Church]
The south entrance to St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas), is shown here, with some of the rockwork landscaping. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25029/
[Crazy Sign]
This picture, looking east with the Baker Hotel in the background, of the Crazy Hotel sign was colorized by Mr. A.F. Weaver. The Crazy Sign was constructed in 1933 in the center of Mineral Wells and spanned Hubbard Street (US 180) at its intersection with Oak Avenue It was quite a landmark, as it was one of only two signs allowed by the Texas Department of Transportation to cross a highway maintained by the State. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958. The urgency of its removal during the Holiday Season was never explained; nor was it ever quite understood by the general public. It was sold for scrap some time later. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25066/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 6 of 13: Dome Detail]
This picture is the seventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. It shows the dome atop the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25021/
[First Presbyterian Church - 3 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fourth in a series of pictures, showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows the dome over the Sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25032/