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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Knights of Pythias Band]
This photograph appears on page 187 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." (Second edition, 1988, by A. F. Weaver) with the caption, "Knight of Pythias 212 Band of Mineral Wells". The photograph is labeled "K of P Band -- Guy Woodward, Director, Mineral Wells, Texas." The Knights of Pythias Lodge is now located at 610 SE 14th Street in Mineral Wells, adjacent to the former Kidwell Heights elementary school. The Knights of Pythias has run an orphans' home in Weatherford, Texas since the turn of the twentieth century. Mr. Weaver had been in possession of a Pythian album, from which this picture may have been abstracted. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38077/
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its proximity to the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex, Lake Mineral Wells State Park is one of the more popular State Parks in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38090/
[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]
A view of part of Possum Kingdom Lake from Observation Point, taken August 11, 1974. Although it is not readily visible, the Morris Sheppard Dam, which impounds the Brazos River to form Possum Kingdom Lake, is on the far right edge of the picture. The view is from a vantage point approximately 150 feet above the water, which in its turn is approximately 190 feet deep at this point. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38094/
We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas
This is a picture that was found in Mr. Weaver's collection, and captioned "We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas." This type of advertising was used by most of the drinking pavilions in this popular health resort to tout the beneficial effects of Mineral Wells' waters. There were numerous testimonials attesting the truth of such claims. When the Food and Drug Administration began to enforce the nation's drug laws vigorously in the mid- 1930's, however, there were no rigorous scientific test data to document such claims or to warn of possible side effects that taking the mineral water might bring about. Consequently, this sort of advertising was banned after the 1930's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38081/
[The Vichy Well and Natatorium]
Found on page 66 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells, Second Edition", the caption for this photograph reads: "First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, later the Beach, and then The Standard Well. It was torn down, and the USO was built during World War II (now [2007] the North Oak Community Center)." For the entertainment of visiting "health seekers", the Standard Pavilion offered a swimming pool, skating rink, dance floor with "name band" visiting musicians, amphitheater, playgrounds with band, children's swings with slide, and a flower garden in addition to its drinking pavilion. The building was home to the Mineral Wells Senior Center for a time. Still known as the Community Center, the building has recently [2007] been leased to the Crazy Water Festival Association, and is slated for renovation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38086/
[The Crazy Hotel in Winter]
The Crazy Water Hotel is shown once again. It appears that the season this photograph was taken is winter, as snow may be seen on the ground. The truck in the photograph appears to be of a type common before 1939. Mineral Wells was a very popular convention city, and the bunting-draped section of the hotel in the foreground probably indicates preparation for a coming convention. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38069/
[A Letter Concerning Mineral Wells High School 1953 Graduation]
A letter is shown here (dated November 27, 2002) from R. B. Shiflet to Bob Bellamy, concerning the Mineral Wells High School graduating classes of 1953 and 1954. It states that the move to the "new" campus occurred during the Christmas holidays of 1953. The letter also describes classroom conditions during this period. Houston School faculty members are mentioned, as well. They included R. B. Shiflet, Mrs. D. R. (Ferne) Hudson and Mrs. Mildred Burnham. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38084/
[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]
A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912. This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of the beneficial minerals inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market. What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably damaged, and was repaired by Mr. Weaver for the making of a duplicate photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38079/
[The Construction of the Post Office]
Written on front of picture is the partial holograph legend: ".ade from the North east ...ner looking Southwest made May the 3rd 1912" It shows the construction of what would eventually be the third Post Office at 201 N.E. 2nd Street. A shear-legs is shown on the extreme left. The workers have clearly stopped work for the taking of the photograph, which is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 150. The building now [2014] houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39177/
[The Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church]
This picture, showing Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church, was taken approximately in 1938. The church, pictured here, shows a later second story to the building on the side of the church proper. It is known to be the second Methodist church on the site. Older photographs of its predecessor are at this time [2014] lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39158/
D. M. Howard Millinery Department
The D. M. Howard Department Store was once located at 101 SW 1st Street. This photograph illustrates its millinery department. The portly gentleman on the far left has been identified as D. M. Howard himself. The identities of the five ladies, the girl, and the remaining gentleman have not been discovered. If one may judge by the clothes of the people shown in the picture, it is conjectured that the photograph was taken within the first two decades of the twentieth century. Five Howard brothers came from North Carolina to settle in Palo Pinto County. D. M. was the first one to come He later sent for his other brothers. The first Howard buildings were at the northeast corner of Oak & Hubbard Streets, facing Hubbard. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39186/
Montgomery Ward & Co.
The front of the photograph obviously reads: Montgomery Ward & Co. A hand-written legend reads: Mineral Wells, Texas Aug 24th 1929 The back reads: North Oak Ave. Built in 1929 Copyright A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39178/
[Oden's Drive Inn]
This restaurant and grocery store was once located at 3403 Highway 280 east in Mineral Wells. It is no longer [2012] in existence. The photograph shows 1940's and 1950's cars parked in front. The Odens resided above the business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39193/
The Howard Building
Shown here is the D. M. Howard Building, once located on 101 Southeast 1st Avenue. It was later the J.M. Belcher Furniture Store, and then again the R. & W. Furniture. The building was torn down March 17, 1975 to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings & Loan building, and for a parking lot to serve it. A Piggly-Wiggly grocery store was built to the right. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39183/
The [Old] City Hall
This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39176/
[Fred Estrada, Street Vendor]
Fred Estrada sold hot tamales near the corner of Oak & Hubbard (and in front of what is now [2009] the Mineral Wells Office Supplies) for 75 cents a dozen. He met his end when an automobile ran him over in the mid-1960's. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on" page 182. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39181/
[John Mathiews Inspects a Well]
John Mathiews, owner of the Crazy Hotel, inspects the first known Crazy Water well under the sidewalk of the northwest corner of the present [2012] Crazy Hotel. The photograph was taken in 1974.It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 29. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39157/
[Sam Whatley & Mr. & Mrs. Evans Holland ]
Sam Whatley (left), representing Young Motor Company, presents a check to Mr. & Mrs. Evans Holland (right) for the winning slogan, "Cadillac Every Time for Better Motor Service." Sam was service manager for the motor company, located at 316 East Hubbard Street. The picture is featured in "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on page 185. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39187/
[The Baker Hotel at Night]
This picture shows the Baker--in its great days--at night. Legend has it that a female guest jumped to her death. Her ghost is supposed to be resident in the building, but substantial evidence for the existence of the ghost remains to this date [2014] lacking. A legend on the front of the photograph states that it was colorized by A. F. Weaver in 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39155/
Mineral Wells Drug Store
The Mineral Wells Drug was located at 110 N. Mesquite Avenue about 1910. Charles Pollard was the manager. The date of this picture is unknown, but it is conjectured (from the dress of the people pictured) to have been taken in the early twentieth century. Please note the scant electric lighting. Also note the (working?) brass spittoon in front of the cigar display. Customers, presumably having a light meal, are located in the far back. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39190/
U.S. O. Club, Mineral Wells, Texas
The only information available about this photograph is solely the legend on it, identifying it as the U.S.O. Club of Mineral Wells, Texas. Further details in regard to this club would be welcome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39182/
Baker Hotel-Mineral Wells, Texas
A panorama View of the Baker Hotel with all the surrounding buildings is shown here. Note: The general appearance of the city surrounding the hotel suggests strongly that this picture was heavily edited. Perhaps it was taken from a postcard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39159/
[Garett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches]
Shown here are Bill Garrett (left) and Walter Dalton (right), proprietors of Garrett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches. It was once located at 110 S.E. 1st Street. Th picture was taken around 1920. It may be seen in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 128. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39189/
[The Firstron Building After a Fire]
The Firstron Building occupied the site of the Oxford Hotel (which burned down)and was itself replaced by the First National Bank (which moved away). The building burned in 1983. Lynch Plaza now [2012] occupies the site. The sign in front of the remains of the Firstron Building reads: Firstron Building OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 325-4461 ROOM 300 It invites ironic comment. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition, on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39196/
[Excavation for the Baker]
Excavation work and clearing of the two blocks in downtown Mineral Wells for the Baker Hotel is shown here. In the background is the Dr. Thompson home, the old First Methodist church and parsonage. The parsonage was moved to the corner of SE 3rd Street & SE 5th Avenue. The filling station in the foreground was located where Murray's Grill parking lot once was [ca. 1950]. The Piedmont Hotel was across the street (NE 1st Avenue.) where the Baker Hotel garage building is now [2009]located. The work has just begun clearing the lots. The tower on top of East Mountain is barely visible above the welcome sign that was erected there in 1925. This photograph comes from the Young collection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39166/
Post Offfice, Mineral Wells, Texas, 1930 (?)
This building once housed the third Post Office in Mineral Wells. The body of the photograph is marked POST OFFICE MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS 1936. Please observe the automobiles parked in front, on the sloping street. It was the issue of insufficient parking that caused the Post Office to move. The building presently [2013] houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39194/
North Oak U. S. O.
This building was erected during World War II as a USO. Many Hollywood stars performed there for the troops during the war. It is now [2009] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39191/
[The Joe Russel Service Station]
This picture shows the Joe Russell Gulf Service Station, once at 501 N. Oak. Note the two frowning men in uniforms, indicating that this was a complete-service operation--virtually extinct in this age [2013]. Further information about the identities of the two men--or the fate of the service station--is not known. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39198/
Aerial View of Camp Wolters
The only information about this photograph appears to be the written legends on it: [At its top] MW-4 AERIAL VIEW OF CAMP WOLTERS, TEXAS [At its bottom] PHOTO BY AERIAL PHOTO SERVICE KALAMAZOO--DALLAS 1B-H586 Camp Wolters was the predecessor of Fort Wolters in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39205/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]
The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men in two of the trees to the right of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39214/
[A Window in the "Texas Carlsbad Water"]
This photograph illustrates one of the painted-glass windows that was installed around 1915 at the Texas Carlsbad Water. It shows a bottle of "#3", extolling its efficacy against "Stomach and Liver Disorders. The Texas Carlsbad Water no longer [in 2012] exists. The picture occurs in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 63. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39228/
[The Smith Memorial at Elmwood Cemetery]
This is a picture of a monument that is to be found in the Elmwood Cemetery. Two Confederate soldiers with rifles (who presumably never went to war) stand at the top of a scrolled pediment that bears the number "32" amidst foliage. Beneath it are crossed sabres. At the very bottom. under the name "Smith", is the motto: "Charity and Humanity Our Religion" in raised letters. This monument may be the grave of the Cicero Smith family. He was the President of Lake View Scenic Railway, also known as the Dinkey Cars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39250/
[Bill Cameron in Front of Old "Index" Building]
Bill Cameron stands before the old "Index" Building--on Northwest First Avenue (across from the Crazy Water Building). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39254/
Convention Hall
The Convention Hall, built in 1925 to accommodate the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. An ice plant and electric plant built by Galbraith (owner of the Hexagon Hotel) had burned, and the rock foundation was used to build the Convention Hall. Demolition of the building began in 1975. A spokesman for the company tearing down the hall stated that the man who imported the London Bridge to Havasu City, Lake Havasu, Arizona, was interested in purchasing the rock foundation to restore an old fort at the London Bridge facility. This picture is featured in "Mini Edition" of "Time Was..." on page 34. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39233/
[A Boy and a Girl in Fancy Dress]
This photograph shows a pre-pubescent boy in formal attire standing by a girl in furbelowed dress, with the train drawn in front of her, and wearing a fleury crown (of cardboard?). She carries a nosegay. He has a boutonniere. An inscription on the back of the picture reads: "Patsy Baughn I think Geo. Kossteson [?]" Further information about either person--or the occasion that warranted the photograph--is entirely lacking at the present [2012] date. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39241/
The Giant Penny
This photograph appears to have been taken in the Convention Hall. The date is unknown. It shows a display of various items on and around a stage. The sign 'The Giant Penny' features prominently. The occasion that prompted the display and the significance of "The Giant Penny' are now [2010] unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39235/
[A Photographic Miscellany of Mineral Wells]
Shown here is a possible composite picture of the attractions about Mineral Wells. It features a panorama of Camp Wolters, dated 1941; A scenic drive, Mineral Wells; the hospital & headquarters Areas; Regimental Areas 4 & 5, Camp Wolters. Several small towns(e.g. Salesville, Graford, and Santo) are shown as existing--but nothing more. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39206/
[Camp Wolters Headquarters; Polio Association]
[The caption page is, unfortunately, partially destroyed] Headqu[......](lacuna)[..]lters Camp Wolters, Texas--Major General [............](lacuna), Command[..] (lacuna) Infantry Replacement Center at Camp Wolters, pres.(lacuna) for [deletion] $453 to Irl Prerston, treasurer of the Palo Pinto Co(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association, as Capt. Harry P. Sheldon, (lacuna) of the Camp Wolters Officers Mess & William P. Cameron, Pa(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association chairman, look on. The c(lacuna) the contribution of Camp Wolters officers to the infantile para[.](lacuna) as the result of a [deletion] President's Birthday Ball held (lacuna) at the officers [sic] mess. The sum [deletion] complements $281 raised by citizens of Mineral Wells at the President's Ball in the city. [signed] Sidney Miller texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39204/
[The Second Post Office]
This picture illustrates the building that housed the second Post Office in Mineral Wells. It was located at 2310 SE 1st Avenue. Note the men: Four of them are in shirt-sleeves, and two are properly dressed (for the era) in jackets. None exhibit the "Cowboy" image of the nineteenth century, so popular in the late twentieth century. Note also the complete lack of automobiles. The picture appears to have been taken possibly in the 1890's (?) It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on p. 149. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39211/
"CRAZY" WATER CRYSTALS PLANT
This photo shows an easterly view of the "Crazy" Water Crystals Plant, the Water Tower, and Crazy Water train cars on the train track adjacent to the Plant. Mineral Wells, Texas texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39224/
[The Crazy Laundry]
In the 1930's, the Carlsbad Building (once a spa for taking the mineral waters. See "The Texas Carlsbad" for details)was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for use as a laundry. Note the painted windows that still proclaim the waters, and the original Texas Carlsbad building. The Panel truck in front was driven by L. C. Ely and the other truck was driven by his father R. C. Ely. This picture was taken sometime in 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39226/
[Elmer Seybold With a Rifle]
Elmer Seybold [(?)-1979] replaces the ramrod on a reproduction rifle. A powder horn & other paraphernalia are visible in foreground. The presence of a small card catalog in the background establishes the locale of this performance to be the old Boyce Ditto Library, in what is now [2013] part of the City Hall complex. The date of Mr. Seybold's presentation is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39243/
[Penitentiary Hollow]
Three ladies (bearing bouquets), a man and a boy perch among the angular boulders of Penitentiary Hollow on the east side of Lake Mineral Wells. Their identities are unknown. This picture is probably a souvenir photograph, taken at some time during the late 1910's or early 1920's. A local story has it that the area gets its name from the "Fact" that cattle thieves were said to be accustomed to cache their booty here, in preparation to driving it on farther for sale. Therefore, anybody detected in this place (who could no give a good account of himself) was likely to find lodging in the nearest penitentiary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39231/
[A High School Coronation, 1947]
The High School Coronation of 1947 had its picture taken in the Convention Hall. The photograph was taken by Du-Caan Studios, Mineral Wells, Texas. The people involved--with two possible exceptions--are not known. [written on the back in pencil: Barbara Bowman Barbara Weaver] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39232/
[Formation of OH-23 Helicopters]
Illustrated in this photograph is a formation of OH-23 Helicopters, presumably at Fort Wolters. Information in regard to the occasion of their flight, or any other data on the helicopters,is unfortunately lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39202/
The Raines Building, Mineral Wells
The Raines Building located at 101 N.E. 1st Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas, was once a drug store, then a department store, later Pemberton's Appliance Store; in 1975 it was Calhoun Furniture Company and in 2008 is the home of Downtown Video. This photograph is found on page 126 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. Note the clothing of the people, the absence of any traffic, and the bunting on the building. A legend in white ink on the lower left-hand corner of the photograph reads: Texas Trade Review." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39216/
[The Chautauqua Hall]
This picture shows a side view of the Chautauqua Hall, once located on the side of Welcome Mountain, where the Jaycee Youth Center is now [2010] located (behind the Grand Theater.) It was taken, perhaps,in late spring or early summer--possibly in the morning. The photograph is featured in "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 50. The building departed from existence in 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39213/
[The Sllew La Renim Club]
The "Sllew La Remin" ("Mineral Wells", spelled backwards) Club formed in 1912. Pictured are: Front Row: Frances Young Mullman; Ida M. Lindon Myers; Eula Strain Harlacker; Mrs. Fred Burman (Sponsor); Mae Cowling; Second Row: Mae Byrd Harris; Mary Lee Hayes Harbinson; Cleo Frost Bowman; Mae Belle Smith; Ruby Johnson Green; Ernestine Pollard; Emma Beetham Brandt; Upper Row: [---] Brown; Frances Hayes; Adelle Watson; Mary Sorley. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39256/
[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]
Lion's Club Womanless Wedding [Around the 1930's or '40's] A note tacked to the bottom of the picture reads: LEFT TO RIGHT: LIONS Conrad Brady Clyde Murray Alton Pope George Ritchie Al Frances Burl Lawrence Charles Garland One "lady" [Conrad Brady] wears the banner "Miss Conduct"; another, [Alton Pope]the banner "Miss Judge." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39245/
[Construction of Oxford Hotel]
Pictured here is the construction of the foundation of the Oxford Hotel (including the First State Bank & Trust Company) in 1906. The hotel was located at Oak and Hubbard Streets. H. N. Frost, father of Cleo T. Bowman and grandfather of Frost Bowman, built the Oxford and founded the bank, which was located on the west side of the building. Some few of the buildings pictured are still [2014] standing. The hotel was owned by the estate until the late 1920's. The Oxford Hotel met its doom by fire in later years. This photograph is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 147. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39208/