You limited your search to:

  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
[The Carlsbad Well Building]

[The Carlsbad Well Building]

Date: 1909?
Creator: unknown
Description: The caption of this 1909 photograph that occurs on page 63 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, notes "...the stained glass windows had not been installed as yet and the "Ben Hur" street car tracks were still running in front of the building." (The Mineral Wells Scenic Railway--the Ben Hur Line to Lake Pinto--ceased operation in 1909, but rails were removed later, probably in conjunction with paving City Streets in 1914.) One of the earlier drinking pavilions, The Carlsbad was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the Crazy Water drinking pavilion. The Crazy Flats Rooming house--which replaced the Crazy Drinking Pavilion--along with the First Crazy Hotel complex--burned in 1925, and were replaced by the current Crazy Hotel, covering the entire block. The hotel opened in 1927. The Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel in the 1930's, and it was used as a laundry.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Knights of Pythias Band]

[The Knights of Pythias Band]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph appears on page 187 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." (Second edition, 1988, by A. F. Weaver) with the caption, "Knight of Pythias 212 Band of Mineral Wells". The photograph is labeled "K of P Band -- Guy Woodward, Director, Mineral Wells, Texas." The Knights of Pythias Lodge is now located at 610 SE 14th Street in Mineral Wells, adjacent to the former Kidwell Heights elementary school. The Knights of Pythias has run an orphans' home in Weatherford, Texas since the turn of the twentieth century. Mr. Weaver had been in possession of a Pythian album, from which this picture may have been abstracted.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]

[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]

Date: August 11, 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of part of Possum Kingdom Lake from Observation Point, taken August 11, 1974. Although it is not readily visible, the Morris Sheppard Dam, which impounds the Brazos River to form Possum Kingdom Lake, is on the far right edge of the picture. The view is from a vantage point approximately 150 feet above the water, which in its turn is approximately 190 feet deep at this point.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Middle Panel of the Oldest Known Panorama of Mineral Wells]

[The Middle Panel of the Oldest Known Panorama of Mineral Wells]

Date: 1882?
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the middle photograph of three that are arranged on pages 40 and 41 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", to create the "Earliest known panoramic view of Mineral Wells around 1882." It was taken from East Mountain looking to the southwest. The photograph includes the center of today's [2008]downtown Mineral Wells. A large white two-story building is shown at the left center of the picture on West Hubbard Street, at the site of the (later) Southern Hotel. The building at the far left edge of the picture occupies on the site of the current Mineral Wells Fire and Police Departments in the 200 block of South Oak Avenue. The center of Mineral Wells' Business District is now [2008] the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180).
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1920?/1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a picture that was found in Mr. Weaver's collection, and captioned "We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas." This type of advertising was used by most of the drinking pavilions in this popular health resort to tout the beneficial effects of Mineral Wells' waters. There were numerous testimonials attesting the truth of such claims. When the Food and Drug Administration began to enforce the nation's drug laws vigorously in the mid- 1930's, however, there were no rigorous scientific test data to document such claims or to warn of possible side effects that taking the mineral water might bring about. Consequently, this sort of advertising was banned after the 1930's.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Vichy Well and Natatorium]

[The Vichy Well and Natatorium]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: Found on page 66 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells, Second Edition", the caption for this photograph reads: "First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, later the Beach, and then The Standard Well. It was torn down, and the USO was built during World War II (now [2007] the North Oak Community Center)." For the entertainment of visiting "health seekers", the Standard Pavilion offered a swimming pool, skating rink, dance floor with "name band" visiting musicians, amphitheater, playgrounds with band, children's swings with slide, and a flower garden in addition to its drinking pavilion. The building was home to the Mineral Wells Senior Center for a time. Still known as the Community Center, the building has recently [2007] been leased to the Crazy Water Festival Association, and is slated for renovation.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Crazy Hotel in Winter]

[The Crazy Hotel in Winter]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Crazy Water Hotel is shown once again. It appears that the season this photograph was taken is winter, as snow may be seen on the ground. The truck in the photograph appears to be of a type common before 1939. Mineral Wells was a very popular convention city, and the bunting-draped section of the hotel in the foreground probably indicates preparation for a coming convention.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]

[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912. This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of the beneficial minerals inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market. What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]

[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]

Date: 1935?
Creator: unknown
Description: Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory." The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II. Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells. The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library