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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1900-1909
A Convention, West Texas Chamber of Commerce

A Convention, West Texas Chamber of Commerce

Date: May 1905
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph shows a view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain. It is inscribed "Convention West Texas Chamber of Commerce." A companion picture is dated "May 4-5-6, 1925". The train depot is in the left middle background. The church in the middle foreground is the First Methodist Church, and immediately behind and above it is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel. The home to the left (east) of the Methodist Church was the home of Pharmacist C. Y. Yeager.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Foster Hotel]

[The Foster Hotel]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: A note on the back of this picture identifies it as the Foster House. It was located at 202 NW 6th Street (given in Polk's Directory for 1909 as "202 West Moore", two blocks north of the Crazy Well) and facing 6th Street. It was one block west of the Hexagon House, and within two blocks of other wells. The style of the building appears to be Queen Anne, spindle-work subtype, with paired gables. The number "2231" is written on the photograph. A railroad ran a main trunk line on the other side of the hotel's block. It was built before 1904 but further history of this early hotel is not known at this time [2008]. Another picture (The Foster Hotel: Second Photograph, which please see) supplies a few more details.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park - 2 of 3]

[The Casino at Elmhurst Park - 2 of 3]

Date: 1907/1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Casino, facing the lake at Elmhurst Park is shown here. For more details about it, please see the other pictures.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Barber Lake]

[Barber Lake]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: Many property owners in early Mineral Wells had their own water wells, but the city pumped water to a small standpipe on East Mountain for distribution to the city. When the wells became insufficient to supply the city's needs, Barber Lake was built in the Barber Addition - in the northeast part of town - as Mineral Wells' first city water supply lake. Around 1905, Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke built a dam across Pollard Creek west of the city to form Lake Pinto, the city's next water supply. Barber Lake, the City's first municipal water supply, can still be found southeast of Cullen Grimes School (built in 1920 at 1800 NE 1st. Avenue as Barber School: the name was changed to Cullen Grimes in honor of a long-time principal when it was enlarged in 1942.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Arch]  "Welcome Ye Editors"

[The Arch] "Welcome Ye Editors"

Date: 1908
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture of the arch, erected to welcome the members of the Texas Press Association (who held a meeting in the nearby Chautauqua auditorium--visible in the background), was taken from East Hubbard Street, looking North on Mesquite Street. The year is 1908. The Texas Press Association held its meeting on May 26. Notice the Ben Hur tracks (1905-1909) in the foreground. The Chautauqua hall was demolished in 1912. A note with the photograph states "The group of people were attending the Odd Fellows Convention and/or Press Convention". The note also states that "Bill Cameron [presumably the boy seated on the arch at the extreme left, and holding a sheet of paper, (not an apron) with the word "WELCOME" barely legible at its head] has an Odd Fellows Apron [sic] on." Please note: Bill Cameron was a long-time editor of the Mineral Wells "Index."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Mosquito  Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas

Mosquito Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1905/1906
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a postcard, reading "Mosquito Street(actually Mesquite Street),Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas." Please note the Chautauqua Theater (1905-1912) at the end of the street. This picture was taken before street car tracks were installed in 1907. Also note the the absence of cars on the street--only horses and buggies.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Cafe Royal

Cafe Royal

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: The caption on the photograph identifies it as the Cafe Royal. This building that houses it, on the NW corner of NW 1st Avenue and 3rd Streets, was known as the W.E. Mayes Building. Upstairs rooms were rented as the Carlsbad Hotel in recognition of the nearby Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion at the opposite (or NE) corner of the block: 700 NW 2nd Avenue. (The first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", page 105, identifies it as the Wells Hotel.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Cumberland Presbyterian Church]

[The Cumberland Presbyterian Church]

Date: 1907/1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a picture of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. On the back of picture is written "901 N.Oak [.] Sold to Church of Christ [.] Demolished and rebuilt." The streetcar tracks, which ran from 1907 to 1913 are visible on N. Oak in front of the church. The church takes its name from Cumberland Street, Philadelphia. A sub-sect of Presbyterianism--based on an Arminian interpretation of Calvinism--was begun at the church there. A Cumberland Presbyterian church is advertised as being in Newberry at the present [2014] time. The picture was taken before North Oak Avenue was paved in 1914. The Church of Christ still [2008] occupies this location on N. Oak Avenue.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]

[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Mineral Wells School Texas  (Architectural Drawing?)

Mineral Wells School Texas (Architectural Drawing?)

Date: 1902?
Creator: unknown
Description: This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." It appears to be a reproduction of a greatly reduced architectural drawing. The building pictured here has been shown to be the Mineral Wells College, under the direction of Professor John McCracken. An edition of the "Weatherford Democrat" of September 12, 1895 reports that the school has had "...six years of phenomenal success, and now finds larger quarters necessary. The beautiful building soon to adorn the campus will be a testimonial from the people as to the excellent work accomplished by Prof. McCracken and his competent faculty, as well as a guarantee to prospectors that their children will be as thoroughly instructed as in larger cities." Although the school touts itself as a "College", the modern reader is more likely to regard it as a private boarding school. The advertisement in the "Weatherford Democrat" shows the building, here, which may be the same picture. Its caption announces that the Mineral Wells College offers "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses." Board is given (in 1895) at "$10.00 per month"; Tuition is listed as "$1,60 to $4.10." The modern reader ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library