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[A Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]
Information taken from the back of the photograph reads: "Entrance to Elmhurst Park with trolley car. Picture taken around 1910. Entrance to the park with a swinging bridge over Pollard Creek later taken over and made into the Mineral Wells dump grounds. About 2 miles southwest of Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20321/
The Woodruff Cottage
Copy around this picture states that the Woodruff Cottage was built by a Civil War veteran who came to Mineral Wells for his health in 1903. His health improved so much, writes the copy, that he decided to build a fine home here with rooms for visitors. A note on the back of the picture indicates the "Cottage" was opened in 1905. The copy also states that it was located one block north of the Crazy and Carlsbad wells, and became quite popular because of its convenient location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20331/
[The Mercer House]
A note on the back of the picture indicates that the Mercer House was built in 1905, and the accompanying description indicates that it was a boarding house operated by Mr. A. S. Mercer and family. The 1909 Polk Directory lists Mssrs. Mercer and Robinson as proprietors. It was located at 210 North Wichita Street [in 2008, NW 1st Avenue], convenient to the leading bath houses, wells, pavilions, and the Mineral Wells Post Office. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20332/
Mineral Wells (1900)
This article and photograph from the Weaver Collection appeared in the Mineral Wells Index in the late 1960's--or possibly the early 1970's. The newspaper attributes the photograph to the "Courtesy of Tom Green," and the research to "Bill Cameron." The article states: "This is the way Mineral Wells looked at the turn of the [twentieth] Century. The Scott Livery Stable, foreground, is occupies the area the Whatley Motor Company does today. Across the street at left was the two-story Holmes Hotel. The barn in the corner, in the center of picture, was the T.J. Green Transfer Company. Mat Birdwell, who purchased horses for the government, had his headquarters in the Green barn. Other spots include the Frost Lumber Yard, next to the Green barn; [the] old Baptist Church steeples, top left; [the] Presbyterian Church, top right, that burned 60 years ago." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20390/
First Car of Shale
"First car of shale" is the legend printed on the original photograph. The car bears the marking "H.M.X. 20" on the rear. The picture probably commemorates the opening of Mineral Wells' fledgling brick manufacturing industry, as the appearance of a gentleman wearing a tie and wielding a shovel suggests a celebration of sorts. His attire shown is typical of summertime 1930's dress. The photograph bears the legend that it was restored by A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20363/
[A Crowd at a Race]
A note on the back of the picture identifies this scene as being at Elmhurst Park. The rails on either side indicate that this is a photograph of a race track. There is a chalk circle in the middle of the track, and a companion picture shows this circle being used for shot-put/discus competition. The spectator in the left foreground is leaning into the track to get a better look at a runner approaching the finish line at the far end of the track. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20329/
[Dust-proof, Round Windows of Motor Chair Car]
An interior view of a McKeen motor car, called by the locals "Doodle Bug", showing its dust-proof, round windows. Two of these 70-foot, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, 81-passenger motor cars made a round trip daily from Graford, Texas, through Mineral Wells to Dallas from June 11,1912 to April 23, 1929. They were joined March 27, 1913 by a similar coach on the Gulf Texas & Western (GT&W) line that ran from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro to Salesville where it traveled over the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells,& Northwestern) rails through Mineral Wells and on to Dallas. This picture is on page 93 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", First Edition, 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20366/
A Convention, West Texas Chamber of Commerce
This photograph shows a view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain. It is inscribed "Convention West Texas Chamber of Commerce." A companion picture is dated "May 4-5-6, 1925". The train depot is in the left middle background. The church in the middle foreground is the First Methodist Church, and immediately behind and above it is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel. The home to the left (east) of the Methodist Church was the home of Pharmacist C. Y. Yeager. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20344/
[The Dam/causeway]
This picture shows the dam that formed Mineral Wells' first municipal water reservoir. This dam is probably the one that Thelma Doss refers to on page 51 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells." Its erection was credited to banker Cicero Smith in that article. Located southeast of the Cullen Grimes School, it is in the G. P. Barber Addition. It was actually built by George P Barber, and the water impounded behind it is known locally as Barber Lake. The lake served to supply water for Mineral Wells until banker Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke (owner of Famous Water Company) built a dam on Pollard Creek, west of the city, to form Mineral Wells' second municipal water supply, Lake Pinto. The original photograph is one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were discovered in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975" and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Some telephone numbers were visible on the envelope, as was the remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20373/
[Mineral Wells, Texas 1881]
This is a photograph of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken in 1881. (Please observe that the picture carries a copyright by A. F. Weaver.) It is the earliest picture of Mineral Wells available. It was mailed to A.F. Weaver by a woman in Colorado, who found it in her great-grandfather's (James Bevan) belongings, in 2004. The late relative was a world traveler, and spent only a short time in Mineral Wells. The photograph was obtained too late to be included in the last edition (the mini edition) of TIME WAS... James Alvis Lynch and his family arrived in Millsap Valley December 24, 1877. He dug a well to 41 feet in 1878, but it was dry. He contracted to have another well drilled in 1880, and it encountered mineral water. The water acquired renown for its medicinal quality. It fetched health-seekers to what would later be Mineral Wells by the thousands. Lynch laid out the city of Mineral Wells on his 80-acre farm in 1881. The unidentified lines of white objects in the upper background are a mystery, but are probably tents. H.M. Berry, an early resident, and Mineral Wells' first school teacher, wrote in 1921, " . . .by the first of October (1881) it looked like a small army was camped here, tents were everywhere." The Lynch cabins, site of the mineral water discovery well, is in the grove of trees at the middle left of the picture. A note on the photographer: James Bevan was born in Lancashire, England, but spent much of his life traveling in the United States (where, presumably, he took this photograph), Australia and Africa. He was acquainted with Cecil Rhodes, whom he reputedly disliked. He cured a Zulu chief of severe constipation, and was made blood brother to him in gratitude. Mr. Bevan would have been put to death (along with the attending witch doctor) upon the event of failure to cure. He spent little time in America. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20337/
[An Early Photograph of Mineral Wells on Bottle]
this picture illustrates an early Mineral Wells photograph on a bottle-shaped brochure. It was taken from Welcome Mountain, and attached to the bottle. Identifiable in the picture is Poston's Dry Goods building near the bottom middle of the picture,the Catholic church at the top left of the picture, and the rear of Dr. A. W. Thompson's residence in the near middle of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20309/
[A View of Mineral Wells From South Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells, looking north from South Mountain, taken after 1929, is pictured here. The front of the old Mineral Wells High School is visible in the lower left corner. The Crazy Hotel is just to the right of center. This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the remark "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20384/
[A Bottle-Shaped Advertisement ]
This photograph shows an advertisement for the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad in the shape of a bottle of mineral water. In 1912, two gasoline-powered motor cars were added to the WMW&NW rolling stock to provide passenger service to Salesville, Oran, and Graford. The Golf Texas & Western Railroad,(GT&W)--sometimes referred to by locals as "Get your Ticket and Walk"--was built from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro and contracted to operate motor coaches over part of WMW&NW north extension in 1912. The GT&W line joined the WMW&NW Railroad some 12 miles north of Mineral Wells. Although the contract for the use of WMW&NW system was signed February 6, 1912, actual operation over the WMW&NW line did not begin until March 27, 1913. The Gulf Texas and Western operated gasoline powered motor coaches, similar to the ones owned by WMW&NW, through Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Ft. Worth and on to Dallas. A round-trip from Seymour to Dallas was made daily by a 70-passenger gasoline-powered, motor car. Completion of Morris Sheppard Dam and the impounding of Possum Kingdom Lake necessitated abandonment of the Salesville to Graford line (and consequently the entire GT&W line) by August 15, 1936. The reverse side of this Mineral Water advertisement indicates that the building of the railroad was underwritten by Beetham and Sons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20353/
[A Rock Outcrop on Mineral Wells "Mountain"]
A rock outcrop, and vegetation typical of the hills (local custom calls them "Mountains") in Mineral Wells. Some of the houses of the town can be seen through the bushes. This photograph is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" were also on the envelope. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20379/
[The J.S. Murphy Home]
The J.S. Murphy home, located on East Mountain (facing West), overlooks the city. The house was built by Murphy in 1905, and remodeled into a full two-story home in 1915. Mr Murphy was a partner of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors, who built many of the homes and buildings of Mineral Wells, including the Old High School. The picture appears on pages 114 and 140 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", 2004, Mini Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20367/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
This is a view from a spot near the dam looking across the lake to Ed Dismuke's Famous Water Company, where mineral water was piped to his drinking pavilion on NW 3rd Street. It was here also, that the Famous crystallizing plant, where "Pronto Lax" crystals were made, was located. Lake Pinto supplied water to the City of Mineral Wells from the time of its creation in 1902, until Rock Creek was dammed to form Lake Mineral Wells in Parker County in 1918, and completed in September of 1920. This photograph is taken from one of 17 (4X4) negatives in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds, addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20380/
[A Panorama of Mineral Wells, Texas: Looking East]
Shown here is Mineral Wells, Texas looking east. This photograph was taken from Northwest Mountain, by A.F. Weaver on September 5, 1997. The Baker Hotel is in the center of the picture, with the Second Crazy Water Hotel in front of and left of the Baker; and the Nazareth Hospital, to the left of the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20346/
[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]
A "Major" Beardsley, a Canadian who fought for Maine in the Civil War, was granted a franchise to construct a railway street system in 1906. He was also granted a 99-year franchise for the generation and sale of electricity in Mineral Wells. He also bought about 600 acres of land, and established three additions: Lowe Place addition, Lawn Place, Lawn Terrace, and Elmhurst Park, which came to sport a dance pavilion and a Casino. The panic of 1907 brought an end to the enterprise. Beardsley's trustee, a Mr. W.B. Smith,and the City of Mineral Wells, sued Beardsley's creditors. A judgment awarded Smith the sum of $15,000, and gave the City of Mineral Wells some sixty acres--which included Elmhurst Park. The legal battle continued beyond 1917, when the decision was reversed and remanded by the Court of Civil appeals for Texas. Number 23 trolley car is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20361/
The Dam and Pinto Lake
This picture appears on page 81 of the Second Edition of "Time Was..." The book states that the lake today [2008]is dry, and owned by C. R. Upham, Jr. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20399/
[A Lady Viewing Mineral Wells From East Mountain]
A lady is shown viewing city of Mineral Wells while standing on a rock formation. She is on East Mountain, looking southwest. A popular activity for tourists was to climb the mountain and view the city. The picture appears to have been taken about 1920. This picture is one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope, some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20385/
The Avalon
The Avalon Hotel was located at NW 3rd Street and NW 3rd Avenue. Assembled here in front of the hotel is a group of people, possibly hotel guests. A reversed-image of this picture appears on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20306/
[The Sangcura Sprudel Fire]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well drinking pavilion was originally located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. It was moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches on the building were enclosed, and it was converted to a rooming house. It burned December 5, 1973, just five minutes before the start of the Mineral Wells Christmas Parade. The remaining part of the Period Hotel on N.W. 4th Avenue, which also burned at another date, was converted into apartments that can be seen through the smoke in the upper left of the picture. This photograph is found on page 64 of A.F Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells,"' First Edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20304/
[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]
This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where SW 25th Street and SW 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20316/
Famous Well
This picture is taken from a series of 17 (4X4) negatives that were enclosed in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma: 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. The photographs were taken January 11, 1919. Also written on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the following: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." The rock building housing the original well was located on Lake Pinto, across West Mountain from the City of Mineral Wells. Mineral water was piped to the Famous drinking pavilion. The Famous Water Company is still [2007] in operation at 215 NW 6th Street, vending "crazy" mineral water, deep-well water, and drinking water filtered by reverse-osmosis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20381/
[The Foster Hotel]
A note on the back of this picture identifies it as the Foster House. It was located at 202 NW 6th Street (given in Polk's Directory for 1909 as "202 West Moore", two blocks north of the Crazy Well) and facing 6th Street. It was one block west of the Hexagon House, and within two blocks of other wells. The style of the building appears to be Queen Anne, spindle-work subtype, with paired gables. The number "2231" is written on the photograph. A railroad ran a main trunk line on the other side of the hotel's block. It was built before 1904 but further history of this early hotel is not known at this time [2008]. Another picture (The Foster Hotel: Second Photograph, which please see) supplies a few more details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20313/
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park - 2 of 3]
The Casino, facing the lake at Elmhurst Park is shown here. For more details about it, please see the other pictures. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20319/
[Barber Lake]
Many property owners in early Mineral Wells had their own water wells, but the city pumped water to a small standpipe on East Mountain for distribution to the city. When the wells became insufficient to supply the city's needs, Barber Lake was built in the Barber Addition - in the northeast part of town - as Mineral Wells' first city water supply lake. Around 1905, Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke built a dam across Pollard Creek west of the city to form Lake Pinto, the city's next water supply. Barber Lake, the City's first municipal water supply, can still be found southeast of Cullen Grimes School (built in 1920 at 1800 NE 1st. Avenue as Barber School: the name was changed to Cullen Grimes in honor of a long-time principal when it was enlarged in 1942.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20387/
[The Lamar Bath House, Lamar Annex]
This picture is the Annex to the Lamar Bath House, and was located south of the first Methodist Church. The first bath house in Mineral Wells (at Dubellett's French Well) was located northeast of the Methodist Church, and was a neighbor to the Lamar property. The White Sulphur Well, operated by a Mr. Ligon, was located across the street--south of the Methodist Church--and sold in 1891. The Lamar Well and Bath House was developed at this time, and served water under the White Sulfur label. The Lamar property became part of the Baker Hotel property when the hotel was built and opened in 1929. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20327/
[The "Doodle Bug" Interior]
This photograph illustrates the interior of a McKeen motor car, known locally as a "Doodle Bug", with its dust-proof round windows. This one, owned by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, was an 81-passenger, 70-foot-long, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, motor coach. It traveled from Graford through Oran and Salesville to Mineral Wells, thence on to Dallas. It made a round trip daily from 1912 to 1929. There was a turntable at Graford to turn the coach around. There were two "Doodle Bugs" on the WMW&NW. The third similar coach, owned by the Gulf, Texas and Western Railroad (GT&W), traveled from Seymour through Guthrie, and Jacksboro to Salesville beginning in 1913. It proceeded thence over the WMW&NW track to Mineral Wells, and on to Dallas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20357/
[A House in Mineral Wells]
Writing on the side of the negative reads: "Vance Villa, Jan. 10, 1919, Mineral Wells." (The 1914 Mineral Wells City Directory lists Vance Villa at 811 N. College, which is now NW 5th Avenue. Mineral Wells actually did have a school in the 1890's, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hubbard Street.) This picture is one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069) and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. It is postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Some telephone numbers and the remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" also appeared on the envelope. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20377/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall, built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20358/
Texas Trade Review
An early street scene showing buildings and a horse-drawn wagon. Written in lower left corner is "Texas Trade Review." The sign over the sidewalk reads "D.M. Howard." There were several D.M. Howard stores (see page 122 in "Time Was...", second edition). This scene was probably on Mesquite Street in the 100 block. It is undated. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20303/
The Bethesda Bath House
The Bethesda Bath House was formerly located 406 N. Oak, with the top of the front of Chautauqua to the northeast of the bath house, visible over the top of the bath house roof's gable at the left side of the building. The Bethesda Bath House apparently contained the office of Dr. G. W. Hubbard. Bathing in the mineral waters was considered a health treatment, and was recommended by local doctors. There is a structure seen behind the bath house in the lower right quadrant of the photograph. This may have been the doctor's residence. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20307/
[A Letter from Mrs. William Wehunt to A.F. Weaver]--dated to about 2002
The letter shown is from "Mrs. William Wehunt", who was the former Katherine Brookshire, whose father owned a furniture store in Mineral Wells. The bank referred to in the letter is believed to have been the Bank of Mineral Wells, that failed in 1924. It had been Mineral Wells' first bank. The Brookshire family of Mineral Wells is believed to be distantly related to the founder of the chain of Brookshire grocery stores. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20300/
[A Hill With Power Poles]
This picture was taken from one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were contained in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope are some telephone numbers and a remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) This picture is taken from East Mountain, Mineral Wells, looking east along NE 4th Street. The ruins of a foundation of a building seen at the end of the street about half-way up the hill was the Chautauqua, completed in 1905 and demolished about 1912. The lookout tower at the top of the mountain was blown away by a tornado in 1930. There is a sign below the crest of the mountain (It appears to proclaim the "Young Photo Garden", which was located at 309 N. Oak Avenue)approximately in the place where the "Welcome" sign was erected in 1922. The Jaycees (Junior Chamber of Commerce) built a youth center on this site in the 1970's, that is still standing at the present time [2008]. Several unidentified people are also to be seen in the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20375/
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20338/
[Pole Vaulting at Elmhurst Park]
Information on the back of the photograph states: "Games (pole vaulting) at Elmhurst Park two miles southwest of Mineral Wells where [the] sewage treatment plant is now located. Picture taken around 1910." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20312/
[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]
The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20334/
[A Charter for the Interurban Road and Street Car Line]
The Mineral Wells Electric System operated two electric street cars in the city of Mineral Wells from 1907 to 1913; one on Hubbard Streeet from NE 17th Avenue to SW 6th Avenue (later part of the Bankhead Highway), and one on Oak Avenue from NE 17th Street to SE 11th Street, thence Southwest to Elmhurst Park. However, two gasoline-powered 70 passenger (all-passenger) motor cars were operated by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad (WMW&NW) between Graford, Mineral Wells, Ft. Worth and Dallas from 1912 to 1935. An electric interurban line was not built. The second part of this notice--the Army-Navy Sanitarium--was never approved by Congress. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20355/
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park]
This is a picture of the Casino, which was once located at Elmhurst Park, and illustrated on page 187 of A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition, 1988. Note: this is an early photograph, taken during or shortly after its construction. In later pictures, watch towers have been added to the pylons framing the front entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20356/
[The Mineral Wells Annual Fair]
Typewritten on the back of the photograph (probably by A.F. Weaver)is: "We attended the Mineral Wells annual fair at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park." The photograph is probably a copy of an earlier image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20395/
The Famous Water Pavilion--Damron Hotel
The Famous Water Wells maintained a pavilion in the lobby of the Damron Hotel, where guests could partake of mineral water. This hotel was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and SW 1st Street. It burned down in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20310/
Three Railroads to Mineral Wells
Pamphlet containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20345/
The Right Ticket
An old advertisement for Mineral Wells, touting the "pleasures" to be had in the city. The lady's crown displays the legend "Health & Pleasure." The "Pleasures" obtainable in the city need not be discussed, as they are plainly describedd in the picture, which may be found on page 91 of the second edition of A. F. Weaver's book, "Time Was..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20347/
[The Hexagon Hotel], Southside
This photograph is a cleaned-up version, by A.F. Weaver, of the Hexagon Hotel, at approximately the time of its completion. (The site has been cleaned, and the trash removed.) Construction of the Hexagon Hotel started in 1895, and it opened for business in 1897, to ameliorate Mineral Wells' torrid summertime heat more than sixty years before air-conditioning became available. A DC generating plant (seen behind and to the left of the hotel) furnished power to an electric light in each room. It was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. The builder/owner, Mr. David G. Galbraith was the inventor of a paper clip; and, with five other men, he held the patent for acetate. The original photograph, included in the A.F. Weaver collection, shows evidence of construction-related activity and debris along NW Holland Street (now [2007]: NE 6th Street). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20301/
[The Crazy Well Bath House]
This photograph was used in A. F. Weaver's 1st edition of "Time Was..." on page 16. His description: "This street scene taken in 1918 showing a drug store on the corner, the bath house next door and then the Crazy Flats north of the bath house. The Crazy Hotel sits just to the West of the drug store. The fire of 1925 March 15th started in the drug store and burned the whole block." (The first Crazy Hotel is not visible in this picture.) Please note the Hexagon Hotel in the distance on the left side of the street. The building across the street with the tower at the right edge of the picture is the Vichy Well and Natatorium, later The Beach, and then The Standard Well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20424/
[Men on Horseback and a Horse-drawn Wagon]
Men are shown here,sitting on horses, while another one sits in a wagon in front of the Holt Hardware Store. The sign hanging on the hardware store sign reads "Tin Shop." A sign to the left of the hardware store reads "Saddle and Harness Shop." A note with the picture states "Joe Myers on Left. William Louis Myers in wagon. Father and grandfather of Julia Myers Thompson." "1904" is written on back of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20461/
[Five Women on a Bridge]
The bridge shown here once spanned the stream in downtown Mineral Wells. It was channelized along the northbound Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad. The same women may be seen in the photograph "Women in Truck." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20445/
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The popular Hexagon Hotel, built in 1897, was the first structure in Mineral Wells to be electrically-lit. Electricity was supplied by a DC power plant next door. It was located at 701 N. Oak, and was torn down September 1959. This photograph is found on page 177 of "Time Was.." 2nd Ed. by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20482/
[A Man With a plow]
A note on back of photograph states that it shows preparation for paving the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Millsap. The note contains the name D. M. Shrum, but does not indicate that it is the person in the photograph. The brick highway to Millsap was part of the nation's first transcontinental highway, the Bankhead highway, from mile zero in Washington, D.C. to San Diego in California. It was built through Mineral Wells in about 1921. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20459/