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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 2 of 18: Rear View]
A view of the south-east rear of St. Mark Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas, illustrates a detail of the structure: East of the sanctuary, the Community Center and a children's playground, with equipment. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25020/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 11 of 13: Close Up of the Dome]
This picture is the twelfth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of The First Presbyterian Church. This picture details the dome atop the church in a close-up view. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25023/
[Newspaper Special - Rotary Convention, 1922]
A special "Rotary photogravure" edition for the Rotary Club Convention, Mineral Wells, that took place in 1922. The edition carries a panoramic view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, and pictures of twenty Rotary officials and Convention Committee Chairmen. George Holmgren, District Governor (third from left), had Mineral Wells' WELCOME sign built in his San Antonio Iron Works, and donated it to the people of Mineral Wells that year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25077/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 5 of 18: Door Leading to Steeple]
The door at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. It leads to the steeple. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25003/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 12 of 18: Close Up of Wood Shingles]
The wooden shingles (shakes) on roof of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas are shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25044/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 4 of 18: Steeple View Facing East]
One of the gables on the roof of St. Mark's Lutheran church, Mineral Wells is shown here. The gables on both the north and south ends of the church appear to be identical. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25038/
[First Presbyterian Church, 13 of 13 : South Side]
The third in a series of thirteen pictures of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows details of the south side of the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25009/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 16 of 18: Roof Reaching Towards the Heavens]
A detail of the gable and roof at the south end of St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) is illustrated here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25025/
[Mineral Wells High School]
This view of Mineral Wells High School, taken from the east in 1940, shows the 1884 "Little Rock School House" (Mineral Wells' first public school) on the north side of the high school. The larger school was built at 101 NW 5th Avenue in 1915. The second high school in Mineral Wells, it still [2008] stands. Three other high schools have been built since the last class graduated from this one in 1955. It is now the property of The Fifty Year Club of Mineral Wells, and it is being restored. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25051/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 9 of 13: South Side]
This photograph is the tenth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church. This picture is a view of the south side of the church, including, at left, the main entrance at southwest corner of building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25012/
[First Presbyterian Church --5 of 13: Front Entrance]
Shown here is the sixth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows a close-up of the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25034/
Young Motor Co.
A text on the photograph identifies it as "May 1952-Grand Opening after fire of 1951," "316 E. Hubbard Street," "Photo by A. F. Weaver." This business was the local General Motors dealership and garage. It became Barnett-Young in late 1960's and in 1984 after Cecil Young's death it was Barnett Motor Co. The building is adjacent to the Baker Hotel parking garage, and, in 2007, it houses the H & H Tire Company. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25055/
[The Rock School House]
The Rock School, erected in 1884, was Mineral Wells' first public school. It was last used in 1957 as a band hall. It was leased to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association in 1974, renovated and converted to a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the City of Mineral Wells. This picture appears to have been taken at the time of its renovation and conversion, as the worker on the ladder makes evident. The bell tower has been enclosed, and window screens and doors have been painted or replaced. The property now belongs to the Fifty Year Club, but the museum is still operated by the non-profit Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25048/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 1 of 18: Three Crosses Visible]
Shown here is a view from the southwest of Saint Mark's Lutheran Church, located at 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25042/
[First Presbyterian Church - 12 of 13: Front View]
This is the twelfth picture in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church prior to its demolition. This is a general view of the church from the southwest corner of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25030/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 15 of 18: Close Up of Rockwork]
The gable at the south end of St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25026/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
Rock Creek in Parker County was dammed up in 1919 to form Lake Mineral Wells, the third lake built as a water-supply for the popular resort town. This photograph appears to be on the east side of the lake where boat docks were located. The lake has been a popular recreation area from the beginning, and is now part of Mineral Wells State Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25092/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 3 of 18, East View of Steeple]
St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas: This photograph shows the gable at the south end of the roof, including some landscaped rock work on the lawn south of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25014/
[In Front of Schoolhouse, ca. 1885]
The back of this photograph shows three notes: 1: "Taken in front of school house about 1885." (This photograph appears to be of the students and teachers of Mineral Wells' first public school, the "Little Rock Schoolhouse," built in 1884.) 2: "Donated by James H. Perry", and 3: "Some are dead. Some are married, and we are all scattered, never to meet on earth again." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25072/
PALOCADE Palo Pinto County
Palo Pinto County celebrated 100 years of existence in 1957. Shown here is a picture of the cover of the official program of the pageant that commemorated this milestone in the county's history. Palo Pinto County began with its formation by act of the Texas legislature in 1856, and its subsequent organization in 1857. As part of the year-long centennial observance, a pageant noting significant events in the county's past was presented at the local football stadium. The program itself contains 28 pages of tidbits of history about people, places and events in the county's heritage, along with a schedule of events organized by the official Centennial Committee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25091/
[First Presbyterian Church -7 of 13: Dome Detail]
The eighth in a series of pictures of architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this picture is a close-up of the dome atop the sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25024/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 8 of 13: Gable Over the Entrance]
The ninth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this view is a close-up of the pediment over the front entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25039/
Crazy Paper Box Company
The Crazy Water Company built a plant in 1919 to extract minerals from its water, box the crystals, and sell them nationwide as Crazy Water Crystals. Part of the crystal enterprise included a box factory. Following an action by the Food and Drug Administration in the late 1930's, crystal operations were reduced and box operation was diversified. On the back of the photograph is written "'Treetop' Erwin, left, was the driver of the Crazy Box Company truck." The photograph is dated 1940, and can be found in A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1974, on page 28. Special note: By magnifying the picture so as to be able to read the license plate of the truck, the date "42" becomes visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25065/
[First Presbyterian Church - 4 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fifth in a series of pictures of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. This picture shows the front entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the church and the dome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25035/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 10 of 13: Close Up of Dome]
This is the eleventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church, being a close-up of the unique dome that topped the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25005/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 6 of 18: Roof View of Steeple and Building]
St. Mark Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. This picture shows details of the juncture of the roof between the south gable of the sanctuary and the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25017/
Nazareth Hospital 25th Anniversary 1931-1956
We have here a copy of the cover of a booklet marking the 25th anniversary (1931 - 1956) of Mineral Well's Nazareth Hospital. The brochure contains pictures of the religious, medical, nursing and administrative staff, with interior scenes of departments, patients and equipment. The Mineral Wells Clinic was built soon after the current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927 to replace the Crazy Flats that burned in 1925. In 1931 the Holy Sisters of the Nazareth purchased the 46-bed facility for $135,000 and moved into the top floor of the building to live and minister to the patients. The hospital was closed in the mid 'sixties. The hospital was temporarily moved to the Crazy Hotel until the present [2009] hospital was built. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25090/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 11 of 18: Retaining Wall Leading to Church]
The south entrance to St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas), is shown here, with some of the rockwork landscaping. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25029/
[Downtown Park]
This photograph shows one of several city parks maintained by the ladies of Mineral Wells. Some pictures identify one or the other of these parks as "Wylie Park." It may be that the separate parks on vacant lots throughout the town were all part of a civic "Wylie Park" program. The Cannas here are quite tall. Brick work edging of the flower beds kept the grass from invading the garden. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25097/
Living Room in Home Econmics.
This picture shows the living room in the Lillian Peek Home Economics Building at Mineral Wells' High School. The Peek cottage was built by the W.P.A. in 1937, and was the first free-standing Home Economics classroom/laboratory in the State of Texas. It is now the property of the Fifty Year Club, and is leased to the Creative Arts Center Studio/Workshop of the Mineral Wells Art Club. Note the construction of the false fireplace with its fire brick lining, which was typical of stucco home construction in the 1930's and 1940's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25049/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 10 of 18: Sun Shining on Roof]
The south gable of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1201 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, a detail of the roof of the Sanctuary and the roof of the hallway connecting the attached Fellowship Hall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25043/
[The Second First Presbyterian Church]
A view barely showing the dome atop the second First Presbyterian Church, which was built in 1909, and located at 300 NW 4th Avenue. The church survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914 that destroyed about six city blocks east of the church. Structural damage to the basement caused the building to be replaced in the 1980's by a more modern structure. This picture is one of 43 negatives in the A. F. Weaver collection, showing construction details of the Lutheran and Presbyterian churches. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25040/
[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]
This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25015/
The Crazy Radio Gang
Hal Collins, Manager of the Crazy Hotel, was convinced, sometime around 1931, that he could sell a boxcar-load of Crazy Water Crystals per week if he advertised on the new medium, radio. The Crazy Radio Gang began broadcasting from the lobby of the Crazy hotel on national radio over the Texas Quality Network. They played in the lobby of the Crazy Hotel at 12:45p.m., 5 days a week. They broadcast over the Texas Quality Network (WBAP, KGKO, Houston, San Antonio). They played dance music broadcast over NBC on Monday evenings. Illustrated, top row from left: Hal Collins (Manager), Frank Dinkins, Francis Quinn, Frank Mc Mordie, Johnny Jordan, Conrad Brady. Bottom row from left: Jack Amlung (Orchestra Leader), Guy Woodward, Maurice Pendery, Dale Woodward, "Sugar Cane and February" (black face comedians Conrad Brady and Francis Quinn). Later, Mary Martin of Weatherford (Crazy Mary), began her professional singing career with this group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25076/
[First Presbyterian Church -- 6 of 13: Dome Detail]
This picture is the seventh in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. It shows the dome atop the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25021/
[First Presbyterian Church - 3 of 13: Front Entrance and Dome]
This photograph is the fourth in a series of pictures, showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows the dome over the Sanctuary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25032/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 7 of 18: Close Up of Roof Structure]
St. Mark Lutheran Church, 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas, showing details of the juncture of roof between the south gable and the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25016/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 8 of 18: Looking at Roof North Side]
Another, tilted view of the south gable of the roof at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, at 2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25013/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 17 of 18: Architechtural View Looking Up at Steeple]
This picture shows a detail of the gable of the Sanctuary, St. Mark's Lutheran Church, Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25019/
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 14 of 18: Side View of Wood Shingles]
The roof at the south end of St. Mark Lutheran Church (2301 SE 25th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25027/
A July Crowd
This photograph,labeled "A July Crowd", shows a ladies' gathering about 1920. The photograph shows what is possibly a tea party or a ladies' club meeting. Some of the ladies shown were members of prominent Mineral Wells families. Identified in a typed note - and graph - accompanying the photograph are: (starting at back left) the 4th lady is Mrs. D. G. Galbraith [wife of the owner of the Hexagon House], the 8th is Mrs. E. F. Yeager [wife of Dr. E.F. Yeager, Pharmacist/ Owner of the Lion Drug Store), 16th is Mrs. J.H. McCracken [wife Dr. J.H. McCracken, president of the Texas Medical Association], 17th may be Mrs. Raines (Mrs. McCracken's mother); (middle row, starting in front of Mrs. Yeager) the second from left is Mrs. Dr. Beeler; (first row from left) the 3rd lady may be Mrs. Coon, the 6th lady is Mrs. Paul Bock, the 8th is Mrs. Reba Williams. The children in front are Langdon Bock on the left and Elizabeth Galbraith on the right. There were forty people in total. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20253/
Thompson-Cunningham Home
This picture is, apparently, a page distributed during a 1975 "Tour of Homes." It is best viewed and read when enlarged on the computer screen. The picture is a copy of the one used on page 141 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. This house, at 215 NE 2nd Street, is Queen Anne style, spindle work subtype. It was restored in 2006 by Bill Pratt, Jr. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20267/
Junior Class, 1913
A photograph of the Junior Class of 1913 is illustrated here. Please observe that two of the men in the front row are wearing soft collars, which was just becoming fashion at the time. The only person identified is Miss David Gladys Galbraith (named after her father, owner of the Hexagon Hotel) in the middle row, 3rd from the right. Identifications of the other people would be welcomed. The Junior class of 1913 would have been the last graduating class from the East Ward School in 1914. Mineral Wells' High School opened that following year, 1915. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20261/
Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells
This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20225/
Davis Bath House Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of the allurements to be found at the Davis Bath House is shown here. This building was used for the Buckhead Bath House at one time, and then used for the Davis Bath House. The building is located in the 200 block of N. Oak Avenue. Still in existence, it is under renovation as of 2010. This photograph appears on page 52 of the Mini Edition, "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20285/
[Games at Elmhurst Park]
A girls' basketball game is being played at Elmhurst Park, around 1910. Ladies in the picture are wearing ladies' basketball uniforms of the day. Ladies at the time played on a half-court, and the game was strictly a no-contact sport. The game was re-started with a jump ball after each score, tie-ball, or infraction of the rules. There were six players on each "side", three "offense", and three defenders. This picture may be found on page 89 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", Second Edition, by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20252/
Judge J. A. Lynch
Shown here is a reproduction of a steel engraving of Judge J. A. Lynch, founder of Mineral Wells. The source of the engraving remains unknown. A fragment of copy at the bottom of the picture mentions the "inconvenience of hauling it from the Brazos River." The initials "GSW" are visible to the left of the judge's lapel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20241/
Piedmont Hotel - [The First Piedmont With Numerous Individuals on Porches]
The First Piedmont Hotel. This photograph was probably taken in the early twentieth century, judging by the attire of the men photographed. The photograph appears on page 104 of "Time Was...", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20286/
[Mineral Wells High School]
This photograph was taken at the completion of Mineral Wells High School in 1915. The Mineral Wells Independent School District donated the building to the Fifty Year Club in 2007. The Fifty Year Club intends to restore the school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20238/
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20247/