You limited your search to:

  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Confiscated Whiskey Stills]
Nick Chandler & Gib Abernathy, officials of the government, have detected, and presumably are about to destroy, illegal whiskey distilling apparatus confiscated during the Great Depression of the 1930's. Abernathy was the Palo Pinto County Sheriff at the time, and also the father of Bill Ray Abernathy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24981/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 2 of 8, A. F. Weaver]
This picture shows Ed Ford, standing before the picture he had painted of Mineral Wells' First Public School. It was built in 1884, and restored in 1975 by The Mineral Wells Heritage Association as a museum to preserve the history of the city. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29422/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 5 of 8, Mr. & Mrs. Jack Dickens purchased 1st Book]
The auction of copies of the first Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." Pictured here are auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, and successful bidders on Copy No. 1: Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dickens. The author, A.F. Weaver, stands in the background, and Mrs. Bea Harris is in the corner to the right of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29425/
Crazy Park Entrance
Shown here is the entrance to Crazy Park, Mineral Wells, Texas, a picture taken in 1938. This park was earlier a part of the Gibson Pavilion and Park in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. It was located a block south of the Crazy Water Crystals plant, built in 1919. The property now [2008] belongs to, and is occupied by, the First Christian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29451/
[The Calvary Baptist Church]
The Calvary Baptist Church was originally located at 708 SE 5th Street. This picture was taken in 1975, shortly before the building was torn down and replaced by a more modern facility. Both the red-brick-trimmed native rock church and parsonage suffered substantial structural deterioration, which necessitated replacement. This series of pictures was probably taken for both a pictorial history of the old church, as well as photographic evidence of the deterioration of the structure that warranted its destruction and replacement. The new church, at this same location, now faces SE 6th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29455/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 10 of 15: Inside View of Store]
A photograph of Will Poston and a cashier inside Poston Dry Goods store, 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. [Will Poston is in cashier's/accountant's office. The cashier is preparing to pull a cord to set the cash trolley system in motion Piles of trousers take up the foreground] A central cashier's stand was what is now known as "state of the art" near the middle of twentieth century. This one was located in a corner of the mens' trousers department. The historic Poston store is now a Mineral Wells annex of the Palo Pinto County courthouse. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29922/
THE CRAZY RADIO GANG
The Crazy Radio Gang broadcast music on the Texas Quality Network Monday through Friday at 12:45 P.M. Pictured are: HAL H. COLLINS "One Man's Opinion", FRANK DINKINS "Dink", FRANCIS QUINN "February", FRANK McCORDIE "Great Lover" JOHNNY JORDAN "Uncle Oscar", CONRAD BRADY Master of Ceremonies, GUY WOODWARD "Curly", MAURICE PENDERY "Brother Pink Nose", DALE WOODWARD "Pee Wee", JACK AMLUNG "Musical Director", SUGAR CANE and February (in black face). Hal Collins was the manager of the Crazy Hotel in the early 1930's when a salesman convinced him that he could sell a boxcar-load of "Crazy Water Crystals" a week if he would advertise them on the new-fangled radio. The broadcasts originated in the lobby of the Crazy Hotel, and became popular beyond all expectations. Orders for the mineral water crystals filled many carloads per week, and they were shipped to all areas of the country. Demand was so great that it exceeded the capacity of the crystallizing plant. A second source of mineral water was found, but it did not match the original patented composition. The company never fully recovered from the heavy fine levied on it by the Food and Drug Administration in the early 1930's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29975/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 4 of 15: Will Poston Holding Cable System]
Will Poston, standing, is poised in preparation to dispatch a container along a cable from the central cashier's office in his store, Poston Dry Goods in 1975. The store was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29951/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 11 of 15: Inside View of Store]
Will Poston stands in his department store, Poston Dry Goods located at 107 N. Oak Avenue. The picture gives a broad view of the boot department of the Western attire carried by the store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29942/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 9 of 15: Outside of Store Front]
Will Poston stands in front of his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). Poston's was the largest department store in Mineral Wells after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the glass show cases in Poston's came from the earlier Howard Brothers store. These cases are on display in the store. The store itself is now the Mineral Wells branch of the Palo Pinto County courthouse. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29928/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 3 of 15: Will Poston Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston, seated at the cashier's station in his store, Poston Dry Goods, located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29954/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 15 of 15; Dry Goods case]
A sewing-thread display case, bearing the Corlicelli brand name, inside the Poston Dry Goods store (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). Poston's was the largest dry goods store in town after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the display cases in Poston's (perhaps this was one of them) had come from the earlier Howard Brothers' store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29924/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 8 of 15: Royal Society Display Case]
The Royal Society embroidery and tatting thread display case with its owner, Will Poston standing next to it, is shown in the photograph. Poston Dry Goods stood at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29933/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 6 of 15: With Display Case]
Will Poston stands with an antique [in 2008] thread (Please not the markings, "Clark", "O.N.T." "White" "Colors" on the drawers) cabinet in his store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue). The year of the picture is 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29939/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29917/
[Poston's Dry Goods, 13 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston stands in his store, Poston Dry Goods, located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, prepaaring to dispatch a container with change to a clerk along the messenger system in use in his store. The photograph was taken in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29949/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 1 of 15: Will Poston]
Will Poston is shown standing in the cashier's station of his department store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). Note the conveyor system by which the cashier received cash and statements from various departments, and distributed change and receipts. Central cashiers were common in department stores from the years of the Great Depression through the time of World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29959/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4,]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29918/
Hal Collins
The name "Hal Collins", manager of the Crazy Hotel in the early 1930's, is printed on the back of this photograph, as well as his autograph on the face. He was convinced that by advertising on the new medium, radio, that he could sell a boxcar-load of Crazy Water Crystals each week. As a result, the "Crazy Gang" began broadcasting from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel over the Texas Quality Network. The noon broadcast became so popular that the sponsor was shipping, not one but several, carloads of Crazy Water Crystals per week to a nationwide audience of devoted listeners. Weatherford's Mary Martin got her start in show business on the program where she became known as "Crazy Mary." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29974/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 4 of 4: Spillway]
Shown here is the lower end of the spillway from Lake Mineral Wells after the flood in March 1976. The dam is barely visible at the upper end of the spillway in the middle of the picture. The road directly below the dam is under water, and is not visible in any other pictures of this flood. It suffered such severe damage that it had to be rebuilt. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29916/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 1 of 4, Flood Stage]
Lake Mineral Wells, Mineral Wells State Park, is shown here in flood stage. Heavy spring rains dumped 7.2 inches of rainfall into the area over a violent week-end in March 1976, resulting in a flood that claimed 24 lives in fire- and water-related incidents. The dam is visible on the far left side of the picture, with water flowing over it. Flood waters cover a large part of the land between the photographer and the dam. The public boat ramp and fueling station are on the peninsula at the far right side of the picture. The picture is part of a group of films labeled "1977", but related news articles give the date as March of the previous year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29919/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 2 of 15: Will Poston Inside His Store]
Will Poston stands at the cashier's station, preparing to dispatch a runner to a clerk in his store, Poston Dry Goods, It was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29957/
[Hubbard Street/Crazy Sign]
This picture affords a view of Hubbard Street, in Mineral Wells, Texas,looking east. Please note the sign above street, "Welcome to Mineral Wells, Home of Crazy." The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958, to the general consternation of the public. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39160/
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60945/
[Mesquite Street]
A picture of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue) looking south is illustrated in this picture. The drug store in the picture is the C. F. Yeager Drugstore on the SE corner of Mesquite Street and NE 1st Street. A bank is also visible at the next corner up from the Yeager Drug which is the SE corner of Mesquite and Hubbard Streets. There are people in the middle of the Street, and several horse drawn vehicles, indicating a parade or demonstration of some sort. Since most of the crowd are ladies in period dress at about the turn of the twentieth century, it could be a demonstration for Womens' Suffrage or the Ladies Temperance League demonstrating for prohibition - no signs or placards are apparent. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20407/
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]
A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20473/
[Early Downtown Mineral Wells]
This early view of the west side of Mesquite Street (In 2008: NE 1st Avenue) from a vantage near the "old Post Office", looking south toward the depot. (This is a cropped version of the picture that appears on page 44 of "TIME WAS ...." by A.F. Weaver). The building on the right with the arched windows was M. H. Coleman's Clothing and Shoes for gentlemen at 205 N.E. First Avenue. The light sandstone building on the right is the Yeager Building. The Lion Drug Store was located in it, as indicated by the lion figure on top of the building. Please observe the unpaved street, and the shallow ruts formed in it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20446/
[Looking North on Oak Avenue]
A photograph, looking north on Oak Street between 1914 and 1916. Work has started on paving the street. This picture is to be found on page 16 of the second edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20406/
[Five Women on a Bridge]
The bridge shown here once spanned the stream in downtown Mineral Wells. It was channelized along the northbound Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad. The same women may be seen in the photograph "Women in Truck." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20445/
Co-Operative Market
This photograph appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "Time Was...", second Edition, on page 189. The Co-operative Market was located on the lot in the 200 block of S. Oak Street, where the present [2010] Fire and Police Departments are located. The sign indicates that women and girls were the market's anticipated customers. The street is paved and curbed, so the photograph was taken sometime after city streets were paved in 1914. The facade of a building behind the CO-OP sign bears a "City Feed Market" - "Hay, Oats, Corn . . ." legend. Note the contemporary automobiles in the foreground. The one on the left (edge of picture) appears to be a WHIPPET touring car. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20447/
Texas & Pacific [Bus]
This is a photograph of the bus that conveyed passengers that got off the Texas & Pacific's "Sunshine Special" in Millsap to their destination in Mineral Werlls. This picture was taken in 1940. Information about this picture is taken from Arthur Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", page 96. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20434/
Strange Structure [article]
An article written by Maid J. Neal, in an unknown publication, describes the construction and design of the Hexagon Hotel, which was built in 1895-1897 by D. G. Galbraith. See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20478/
[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]
Shown in this picture are, from left to right: Maggie McDaniel, Annabel Cushman, Myra Hunt Oliver and (Valedictorian) Ferdinand "Doc" Howard. The title of his valedictory address was "The Electrical Age." The diplomas were presented by Judge F.C. Highsmith. This photograph is to be found in the second edition of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver on page 189. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20472/
[Women in a Truck]
An unknown group of six women is shown posing on a truck. The type of truck is also not known. There are two photographs of this group of women with not a clue concerning who they were. See also, the photograph "Five Women on Bridge." The Bimini Bath House is in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20456/
[Palo Pinto General Hospital]
Palo Pinto General Hospital opened in 1970 and is located west of Mineral Wells. It has been, since this picture was taken, enlarged and remodeled extensively. This hospital replaced the downtown Nazareth Hospital. While the hospital was been built, the first two floors of the Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 168. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39173/
MINERAL WELLS TEXAS CARLSBAD WATER
This picture appears to be a label taken from a container of mineral water sold by the Texas Carlsbad Water Company. The label describes the water as "Purgative" and "Diuretic." DIRECTIONS state further: The average person requires from 8 to 12 glasses per day, but there are those who need less, and others for whom this quantity will not suffice. Hence drink such quantity as gives desired effect, be it small or great. One or two glasses taken hot, half hour before breakfast, will be found very effective. The label ends with the legend: This Label Censored [sic] by the Parker-Palo Pinto Co. Medical Society. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39227/
"Crazy Hotel Opens"
CRAZY HOTEL OPENS: A program Presented by A.F. Weaver to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association March 10, 1994. [This is the first of ten pages, stapled at upper left-hand corner.] The text was probably computer-generated in 13-point sans-serif script and it is likely that Mr. Weaver began his program with a contemporary newspaper account of the gala opening of the re-built hotel. Certainly the opening of the significant hotel was a red-letter day in the history of Mineral Wells. A photocopy of a souvenir menu was laminated on the back of Mr. Weaver's prepared program.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38087/
[A Farm House]
A color photograph of a farmhouse in Palo Pinto County is illustrated here. The exact date of the picture is unknown. This one was found among other photographs taken in Thurber, so the locale shown may have been found there. Please note the red soil, which characteristically forms over limestone. Its typical of the county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38068/
Crazy Hotel, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture illustrates a postcard of the Crazy Hotel, taken about 1930, well after the "Crazy" burned in 1925. This is a view of the rebuilt hotel, which opened in 1927. It was considered completely up-to-date, and built with solid masonry interior walls to make it fire-proof. The facility is currently [2008] used as a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38070/
[Sllew La Renim]
The caption on page 118 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" (first edition, 1974) by A. F. Weaver, states: "The "SLLEW La RENIM Club was 'Mineral Wells' spelled backwards. The members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers." The ladies of the time used parasols to shade themselves from the sun. (There are seven ladies in the picture, but only six are identified. As deduced from the notes on the back of the picture, Mary Lee Hayes is believed to be the third lady in line in the picture.) The Mineral Wells Sanitarium, originally known as The Exchange Hotel, is shown in the upper left of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38074/
[Ladies Hold Flowers]
This photograph presents a mystery. Ten ladies, dressed in 1920's-style fashion, stand on the steps of the Baker Hotel, holding bouquets of chrysanthemums; one lady has roses; a basket of flowers with a tulle ribbon stands in foreground. The occasion for this display is entirely unknown. A legend on back reads: "For Q from L Mrs Joe Young." The identities of the people mentioned are entirely unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39246/
[Three Women and a Man In Front of a Car]
Three unknown women and a man are shown standing in front of a large automobile. The man sports a celluloid collar & a straw hat. One lady carries a reticule, another an umbrella. Benches are visible behind them all. The date of the picture is also unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39247/
[Bill Cameron]
"Bill Cameron at his desk in the [old] Mineral Wells Index." The newspaper office was located at 207 NW 1st Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39255/
[Twenty Men and One Woman in Front of a Building]
Illustrated here are 20 unidentified men (some in uniform) and 1 unidentified woman standing in front of an unidentified building. Four of the men have removed their hats. The dress of the woman suggests the early 1920's. The occasion is not known. The photograph taken by Young's Studio of Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39252/
Convention Hall
The Convention Hall, built in 1925 to accommodate the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. An ice plant and electric plant built by Galbraith (owner of the Hexagon Hotel) had burned, and the rock foundation was used to build the Convention Hall. Demolition of the building began in 1975. A spokesman for the company tearing down the hall stated that the man who imported the London Bridge to Havasu City, Lake Havasu, Arizona, was interested in purchasing the rock foundation to restore an old fort at the London Bridge facility. This picture is featured in "Mini Edition" of "Time Was..." on page 34. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39233/
The Giant Penny
This photograph appears to have been taken in the Convention Hall. The date is unknown. It shows a display of various items on and around a stage. The sign 'The Giant Penny' features prominently. The occasion that prompted the display and the significance of "The Giant Penny' are now [2010] unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39235/
North Oak U. S. O.
This building was erected during World War II as a USO. Many Hollywood stars performed there for the troops during the war. It is now [2009] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39191/
[Oden's Drive Inn]
This restaurant and grocery store was once located at 3403 Highway 280 east in Mineral Wells. It is no longer [2012] in existence. The photograph shows 1940's and 1950's cars parked in front. The Odens resided above the business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39193/
[Possum Kingdom Lake - Observation Point]
A view of part of Possum Kingdom Lake from Observation Point, taken August 11, 1974. Although it is not readily visible, the Morris Sheppard Dam, which impounds the Brazos River to form Possum Kingdom Lake, is on the far right edge of the picture. The view is from a vantage point approximately 150 feet above the water, which in its turn is approximately 190 feet deep at this point. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38094/
[D. W. Griffith]
D. W. Griffith is shown standing on the roof of the new Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927 and replaced the First Crazy Hotel which had burned in 1925. Mr. Griffith, who produced silent movies including the "Keystone Kops" comedies, and the classic film "Birth of a Nation", was a guest at the Crazy Hotel while visiting Mineral Wells in 1929. A commemorative postage stamp was issued in his honor on May 27, 1975. Mr. Griffith was impressed by the "WELCOME" sign on East Mountain (the world's largest non-commercial, electrically-lighted sign at the time). He developed the "HOLLYWOOD HILLS" addition with other partners when he returned to California, and he erected what is probably the most recognizable landmark in America: The HOLLYWOOD sign in Los Angeles. Both signs have survived similar difficult times in their histories. This picture appears on page 19 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38073/