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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
U.S. O. Club, Mineral Wells, Texas
The only information available about this photograph is solely the legend on it, identifying it as the U.S.O. Club of Mineral Wells, Texas. Further details in regard to this club would be welcome. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39182/
Baker Hotel-Mineral Wells, Texas
A panorama View of the Baker Hotel with all the surrounding buildings is shown here. Note: The general appearance of the city surrounding the hotel suggests strongly that this picture was heavily edited. Perhaps it was taken from a postcard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39159/
[Garett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches]
Shown here are Bill Garrett (left) and Walter Dalton (right), proprietors of Garrett & Walton Cold Drinks & Sandwiches. It was once located at 110 S.E. 1st Street. Th picture was taken around 1920. It may be seen in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 128. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39189/
[The Firstron Building After a Fire]
The Firstron Building occupied the site of the Oxford Hotel (which burned down)and was itself replaced by the First National Bank (which moved away). The building burned in 1983. Lynch Plaza now [2012] occupies the site. The sign in front of the remains of the Firstron Building reads: Firstron Building OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 325-4461 ROOM 300 It invites ironic comment. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition, on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39196/
[The Old Post Office]
This picture shows what is now [2101] known as "The Old Post Office Building." A horse, dragging a cart, is seen drinking out of a trough in front of it. The trough is now [2010]located in the Mineral Wells Commons park. The whereabouts of horse is unknown. The building now [2010] houses the Women's club. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 188. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39197/
[Excavation for the Baker]
Excavation work and clearing of the two blocks in downtown Mineral Wells for the Baker Hotel is shown here. In the background is the Dr. Thompson home, the old First Methodist church and parsonage. The parsonage was moved to the corner of SE 3rd Street & SE 5th Avenue. The filling station in the foreground was located where Murray's Grill parking lot once was [ca. 1950]. The Piedmont Hotel was across the street (NE 1st Avenue.) where the Baker Hotel garage building is now [2009]located. The work has just begun clearing the lots. The tower on top of East Mountain is barely visible above the welcome sign that was erected there in 1925. This photograph comes from the Young collection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39166/
Post Offfice, Mineral Wells, Texas, 1930 (?)
This building once housed the third Post Office in Mineral Wells. The body of the photograph is marked POST OFFICE MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS 1936. Please observe the automobiles parked in front, on the sloping street. It was the issue of insufficient parking that caused the Post Office to move. The building presently [2013] houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39194/
AWO_2624P.jpg [Men Around A Buffet Table] jd
Five men and one woman stand around a buffet table. Several of the men wear foil-covered paper derby-style hats, which indicates a festivity of some sort. In the background, a man plays an alto saxophone; another one, a guitar; a third, a bass viol. The envelope containing this picture identifies the second man from left as "Orval Shore", and the third man from left as "Paul Schneider." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39165/
North Oak U. S. O.
This building was erected during World War II as a USO. Many Hollywood stars performed there for the troops during the war. It is now [2009] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39191/
[The Joe Russel Service Station]
This picture shows the Joe Russell Gulf Service Station, once at 501 N. Oak. Note the two frowning men in uniforms, indicating that this was a complete-service operation--virtually extinct in this age [2013]. Further information about the identities of the two men--or the fate of the service station--is not known. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39198/
Aerial View of Camp Wolters
The only information about this photograph appears to be the written legends on it: [At its top] MW-4 AERIAL VIEW OF CAMP WOLTERS, TEXAS [At its bottom] PHOTO BY AERIAL PHOTO SERVICE KALAMAZOO--DALLAS 1B-H586 Camp Wolters was the predecessor of Fort Wolters in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39205/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]
The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men in two of the trees to the right of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39214/
[A Window in the "Texas Carlsbad Water"]
This photograph illustrates one of the painted-glass windows that was installed around 1915 at the Texas Carlsbad Water. It shows a bottle of "#3", extolling its efficacy against "Stomach and Liver Disorders. The Texas Carlsbad Water no longer [in 2012] exists. The picture occurs in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 63. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39228/
[The Smith Memorial at Elmwood Cemetery]
This is a picture of a monument that is to be found in the Elmwood Cemetery. Two Confederate soldiers with rifles (who presumably never went to war) stand at the top of a scrolled pediment that bears the number "32" amidst foliage. Beneath it are crossed sabres. At the very bottom. under the name "Smith", is the motto: "Charity and Humanity Our Religion" in raised letters. This monument may be the grave of the Cicero Smith family. He was the President of Lake View Scenic Railway, also known as the Dinkey Cars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39250/
[Bill Cameron in Front of Old "Index" Building]
Bill Cameron stands before the old "Index" Building--on Northwest First Avenue (across from the Crazy Water Building). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39254/
[Twenty Men and One Woman in Front of a Building]
Illustrated here are 20 unidentified men (some in uniform) and 1 unidentified woman standing in front of an unidentified building. Four of the men have removed their hats. The dress of the woman suggests the early 1920's. The occasion is not known. The photograph taken by Young's Studio of Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39252/
Convention Hall
The Convention Hall, built in 1925 to accommodate the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. An ice plant and electric plant built by Galbraith (owner of the Hexagon Hotel) had burned, and the rock foundation was used to build the Convention Hall. Demolition of the building began in 1975. A spokesman for the company tearing down the hall stated that the man who imported the London Bridge to Havasu City, Lake Havasu, Arizona, was interested in purchasing the rock foundation to restore an old fort at the London Bridge facility. This picture is featured in "Mini Edition" of "Time Was..." on page 34. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39233/
[A Boy and a Girl in Fancy Dress]
This photograph shows a pre-pubescent boy in formal attire standing by a girl in furbelowed dress, with the train drawn in front of her, and wearing a fleury crown (of cardboard?). She carries a nosegay. He has a boutonniere. An inscription on the back of the picture reads: "Patsy Baughn I think Geo. Kossteson [?]" Further information about either person--or the occasion that warranted the photograph--is entirely lacking at the present [2012] date. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39241/
The Giant Penny
This photograph appears to have been taken in the Convention Hall. The date is unknown. It shows a display of various items on and around a stage. The sign 'The Giant Penny' features prominently. The occasion that prompted the display and the significance of "The Giant Penny' are now [2010] unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39235/
[A Photographic Miscellany of Mineral Wells]
Shown here is a possible composite picture of the attractions about Mineral Wells. It features a panorama of Camp Wolters, dated 1941; A scenic drive, Mineral Wells; the hospital & headquarters Areas; Regimental Areas 4 & 5, Camp Wolters. Several small towns(e.g. Salesville, Graford, and Santo) are shown as existing--but nothing more. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39206/
[Camp Wolters Headquarters; Polio Association]
[The caption page is, unfortunately, partially destroyed] Headqu[......](lacuna)[..]lters Camp Wolters, Texas--Major General [............](lacuna), Command[..] (lacuna) Infantry Replacement Center at Camp Wolters, pres.(lacuna) for [deletion] $453 to Irl Prerston, treasurer of the Palo Pinto Co(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association, as Capt. Harry P. Sheldon, (lacuna) of the Camp Wolters Officers Mess & William P. Cameron, Pa(lacuna) Infantile Paralysis Association chairman, look on. The c(lacuna) the contribution of Camp Wolters officers to the infantile para[.](lacuna) as the result of a [deletion] President's Birthday Ball held (lacuna) at the officers [sic] mess. The sum [deletion] complements $281 raised by citizens of Mineral Wells at the President's Ball in the city. [signed] Sidney Miller texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39204/
[The Second Post Office]
This picture illustrates the building that housed the second Post Office in Mineral Wells. It was located at 2310 SE 1st Avenue. Note the men: Four of them are in shirt-sleeves, and two are properly dressed (for the era) in jackets. None exhibit the "Cowboy" image of the nineteenth century, so popular in the late twentieth century. Note also the complete lack of automobiles. The picture appears to have been taken possibly in the 1890's (?) It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on p. 149. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39211/
"CRAZY" WATER CRYSTALS PLANT
This photo shows an easterly view of the "Crazy" Water Crystals Plant, the Water Tower, and Crazy Water train cars on the train track adjacent to the Plant. Mineral Wells, Texas texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39224/
[The Crazy Laundry]
In the 1930's, the Carlsbad Building (once a spa for taking the mineral waters. See "The Texas Carlsbad" for details)was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for use as a laundry. Note the painted windows that still proclaim the waters, and the original Texas Carlsbad building. The Panel truck in front was driven by L. C. Ely and the other truck was driven by his father R. C. Ely. This picture was taken sometime in 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39226/
[Elmer Seybold With a Rifle]
Elmer Seybold [(?)-1979] replaces the ramrod on a reproduction rifle. A powder horn & other paraphernalia are visible in foreground. The presence of a small card catalog in the background establishes the locale of this performance to be the old Boyce Ditto Library, in what is now [2013] part of the City Hall complex. The date of Mr. Seybold's presentation is unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39243/
[W. W. Howard's Hardware Store]
The Howard Hardware store was once located at 101 E. Hubbard St. The dimness of the store makes discerning the items on sale difficult. A double row of "air-tight" stoves ranks down the center, flanked at the foreground by a display of guns. Persons identified in picture are: Helin Howard, Flora Howard, A. L. Howard and one unidentified person. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39215/
[The Crazy Box Factory Crew 1940]
A. F. Weaver, Sr. (seated on the left) raised money--just before World War II--to build the new building just behind the Crazy Box Factory. He is pictured here with the staff of the building. The Polluck Paper and Box Company took over the plant right after the war. It later became the St. Regis Packaging. The photograph dates to 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39221/
[Penitentiary Hollow]
Three ladies (bearing bouquets), a man and a boy perch among the angular boulders of Penitentiary Hollow on the east side of Lake Mineral Wells. Their identities are unknown. This picture is probably a souvenir photograph, taken at some time during the late 1910's or early 1920's. A local story has it that the area gets its name from the "Fact" that cattle thieves were said to be accustomed to cache their booty here, in preparation to driving it on farther for sale. Therefore, anybody detected in this place (who could no give a good account of himself) was likely to find lodging in the nearest penitentiary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39231/
[A High School Coronation, 1947]
The High School Coronation of 1947 had its picture taken in the Convention Hall. The photograph was taken by Du-Caan Studios, Mineral Wells, Texas. The people involved--with two possible exceptions--are not known. [written on the back in pencil: Barbara Bowman Barbara Weaver] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39232/
Famous Mineral Water "At the Sign on of the Old Well"
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39260/
[The Burning of the First Crazy Hotel]
The first Crazy Hotel burned in 1925. This photograph shows the fire as it is burning out, and only a few pieces of the structure still stand. The sign seen in the left part of the photo says "Crazy Drug Co." which was the pharmacy inside the hotel. The hotel was rebuilt and claims to be fire proof. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39218/
[Formation of OH-23 Helicopters]
Illustrated in this photograph is a formation of OH-23 Helicopters, presumably at Fort Wolters. Information in regard to the occasion of their flight, or any other data on the helicopters,is unfortunately lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39202/
The Raines Building, Mineral Wells
The Raines Building located at 101 N.E. 1st Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas, was once a drug store, then a department store, later Pemberton's Appliance Store; in 1975 it was Calhoun Furniture Company and in 2008 is the home of Downtown Video. This photograph is found on page 126 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. Note the clothing of the people, the absence of any traffic, and the bunting on the building. A legend in white ink on the lower left-hand corner of the photograph reads: Texas Trade Review." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39216/
[The Chautauqua Hall]
This picture shows a side view of the Chautauqua Hall, once located on the side of Welcome Mountain, where the Jaycee Youth Center is now [2010] located (behind the Grand Theater.) It was taken, perhaps,in late spring or early summer--possibly in the morning. The photograph is featured in "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 50. The building departed from existence in 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39213/
[A String and Drum Band]
This picture shows 18 people, 2 of whom appear to be adults. Visible are a snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, violins, lutes, bass viol and viola. The background appears to be painted. Further information about this band is presently [2012]lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39240/
[The Sllew La Renim Club]
The "Sllew La Remin" ("Mineral Wells", spelled backwards) Club formed in 1912. Pictured are: Front Row: Frances Young Mullman; Ida M. Lindon Myers; Eula Strain Harlacker; Mrs. Fred Burman (Sponsor); Mae Cowling; Second Row: Mae Byrd Harris; Mary Lee Hayes Harbinson; Cleo Frost Bowman; Mae Belle Smith; Ruby Johnson Green; Ernestine Pollard; Emma Beetham Brandt; Upper Row: [---] Brown; Frances Hayes; Adelle Watson; Mary Sorley. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39256/
[First State Bank & Trust]
Shown here is an interior view of the First State Bank & Trust Company, later known as the State National Bank, located at 102 East Hubbard. This bank was organized in 1906, and it became the State National Bank in 1925. The First National Bank was merged with the State National Bank in 1931. The official name of the institution became First National Bank in 1955. At the desk is H. N. Frost, then president. Standing is W. I. Smith, Vice-President & cashier. The teller is unidentified. The photograph was taken 1921. It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 147. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39210/
[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]
Lion's Club Womanless Wedding [Around the 1930's or '40's] A note tacked to the bottom of the picture reads: LEFT TO RIGHT: LIONS Conrad Brady Clyde Murray Alton Pope George Ritchie Al Frances Burl Lawrence Charles Garland One "lady" [Conrad Brady] wears the banner "Miss Conduct"; another, [Alton Pope]the banner "Miss Judge." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39245/
[Three Women and a Man In Front of a Car]
Three unknown women and a man are shown standing in front of a large automobile. The man sports a celluloid collar & a straw hat. One lady carries a reticule, another an umbrella. Benches are visible behind them all. The date of the picture is also unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39247/
[Construction of Oxford Hotel]
Pictured here is the construction of the foundation of the Oxford Hotel (including the First State Bank & Trust Company) in 1906. The hotel was located at Oak and Hubbard Streets. H. N. Frost, father of Cleo T. Bowman and grandfather of Frost Bowman, built the Oxford and founded the bank, which was located on the west side of the building. Some few of the buildings pictured are still [2014] standing. The hotel was owned by the estate until the late 1920's. The Oxford Hotel met its doom by fire in later years. This photograph is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 147. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39208/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the Civic League Island at Lake Mineral Wells, four miles east of Mineral Wells, Texas, with a rustic bridge connecting the two small islands, picnic tables, and grilles. In the foreground, there are two small boats with canopies, carrying passengers on the water of the lake. A forested shoreline is visible in the background of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39230/
[A Letter from Texas Governor to D.C. Harris]
James V. Allred, then governor of Texas wrote, on July 14, 1938, to D.C. Harris a charming response to a letter Mr. Harris had sent to him. The original letter, that prompted this reply, has not survived to this day [2010]. Mr.Allred's letter is reproduced here for the benefit of the curious. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39251/
[Walker's Grocery and Market]
Shown here is the J.J. Walker Grocery & Market, once located at 614 Southeast 6th Avenue. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 176. The identities of the three people pictured is not known. Note, however, the hand-operated gasoline pumps, the oil pumps in the background, and a sign that advertises Texaco gasoline at 18 cents per gallon! texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39212/
[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 4 of 5]
A holograph legend on the back of this picture states: "Tearing down Convention Hall 1976." The photograph illustrates the demolition of the building in full swing. Only the skeleton of the roof remains, and the walls are in ruins. This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39234/
[Bill Cameron]
"Bill Cameron at his desk in the [old] Mineral Wells Index." The newspaper office was located at 207 NW 1st Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39255/
[Men and a Woman Around a Microphone]
Five men and a lady are pictured congregating around a microphone. The numbers "5195" are seen obscurely on it. An alert-looking boy in the background holds a musical instrument, as does one of the men. A man in striped pants talks into the microphone. The occasion is entirely unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39248/
Entrance to Camp Wolters; Kitchens & Mess Halls
A legend on the bottom of the photograph clearly reads: Left: Top, Entrance to Camp Wolters. Bottom, Kitchens and Mess Halls, Camp Wolters." It shows seven rock-faced buildings with a curb in front of them. Ash cans, and trash repositories--also rock-faced--are visible on left. Five men--unidentified--stand around. The date of the photograph has not been preserved, but Camp Wolters was the World War I predecessor of the later Fort Wolters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39201/
[A Man and a Woman on Donkeys]
Shown here is a rocky, bosky hillside. A man and a woman are both on donkeys; he leans over with a hand on her donkey; five photographer, under veils, catch the scene with cameras. Note that the photographers all wear vests. The clothing of the woman suggests early 20th century. No more is known about this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39242/
[A View of Mineral Wells, Before the Building of the Baker Hotel]
A view of Mineral Wells from West Mountain, taken before the Baker Hotel was built. The picture therefore predates 1929. Just to the left of the upper center is the Hexagon Hotel. To the right of that, almost at the upper center, is the Standard Well and Amusement Park. On top of the hill are homes on what is now Northeast 4th Avenue. Some of these houses (especially the one with columns) are still in existence today [2009]. At the southern base of the hill, the house which Mr. Pratt restored in 2006-7 can be seen next to the Sanatorium. The Hexagon Hotel and the Standard Well no longer exist. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20452/
[The Grande Courts]
A tourist court, built about 1930 by Charlie E. Turner, Harold Dennis, and Clarence Hunt is depicted here. It was located in the 1000 block of West Hubbard Street. Grande [pronounced "Grand-dee"--at least in Mineral Wells] Courts was a national chain of franchise motels. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 99. The sign reads "Grande Courts Tourist Apts." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20429/