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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1910-1919
[The First Crazy Hotel]

[The First Crazy Hotel]

Date: 1913
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the front of the first Crazy Hotel, which was destroyed by fire March 15, 1925. Built in two stages and joined together, the first (back) section was built in 1912, and the second (front) section was completed in 1914. A handwritten note on back of photograph states, "Crazy Hotel 1913. Front of Hotel Facing South Mineral Wells, Tx." This picture is included on page 15 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS...", and was probably taken before the second section of the hotel opened for business. The back of Crazy Flats (the second Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion) can be seen to the right, north of and behind the hotel in this picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Gibson Well- - Souvenir Photograph]

[The Gibson Well- - Souvenir Photograph]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture appears to be a souvenir photograph of the Gibson Well drinking pavilion and park, one of the earliest mineral water supply spots in Mineral Wells. It grew into one of the larger parks and pavilions in town. The gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway passed here every quarter-hour (from 1905 to 1909) on their journey to and from Lake Pinto. The Crazy Industries had acquired the property by 1938, and it became known as Crazy Park, a beautiful botanical park. The mineral water industry became a victim of the FDA and the wartime activities during World War II. As a result, the mineral water pavilions, along with other parts of the local health industry, died a slow death. The First Christian Church now occupies the site of the Gibson pavilion.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

Date: 1912?
Creator: unknown
Description: Mineral Wells had an early horse-drawn fire wagon, pulled by two white horses (named Joe and Frank) and driven by a man named Cogdell. This picture is included on page 189 of the Second Edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", by A. F. Weaver. The city's first fire station was located at 202 N. Oak Avenue, but the horses had difficulty responding to emergency calls from this fire station because the fire wagon's wheels tended to get trapped in the street car tracks that ran down the center of Oak Avenue, which was not paved at that time. This fire was in the central business district (note the roofs of two multistory buildings, visible at the upper left edge of the picture.) Fire hoses laid along the street are being used by two men in the left middle background to furnish water to fight the fire. The location of this particular fire is not specified, but is probably the Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas.) Mineral Wells has experienced several disastrous fires in the past; one in 1914, two blocks west of the Delaware' location, destroyed six city blocks.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]

[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: An early scene of Mesquite Street (now [2008] NE 1st Avenue) looking North toward old U.S. Post Office from the corner of East Hubbard Street. Electrical lines are present as are cars and trucks typical of the post-1914 era, when the streets of Mineral Wells were paved. The cornerstone for the Post Office was laid in May, 1912. The building on the near right housed Campbell's Bargain store. It occupied the site of the current Baker Hotel (Opened in 1929.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Texas Carlsbad Well Slogan]

[The Texas Carlsbad Well Slogan]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: A picture of the slogan posted in the Texas Carlsbad Well pavilion with "proof" that a Cadillac, with its radiator filled with mineral water, was rejuvenated with enough "pep" to pass a Chevrolet. Please note: The first Cadillac V-8 engine was introduced in 1914 as the 'Type 51' engine, so this photograph may be dated to 1914 or thereafter.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View from West Mountain, about 1912]

[A View from West Mountain, about 1912]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph was taken after the Chautauqua was demolished (that is, about 1912). The foundation can be seen in the upper right quadrant. The Post Office, completed in 1913, is visible to the right of the Chautauqua ruins. The old viewing tower on the top of the hill, destroyed by a tornado in 1930, is just barely visible in the trees on top of the hill. The first Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats drinking pavilion, which burned in 1925, are seen one block northwest of the Post Office. The Murphy home is on top of the hill in the middle of the photograph. The Hexagon Hotel (torn down in 1959) is just above and left of the center. The Vichy Well is just to the right of the Hexagon House, and is now the location of the North Oak Community Center. In the the next block north (left) of the Hexagon House, facing west, is the Fairfield Inn with a ground-level entrance on each floor. Note the city's water tower at left center.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View From South Mountain Toward East Mountain]

[A View From South Mountain Toward East Mountain]

Date: 1912?/1929?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view from South Mountain, toward East Mountain, before the Baker Hotel was built in the 1929 is shown here. The Old Post Office building, built in 1912, is in the upper left quadrant. This picture is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975", and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope were some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]

[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: Mineral Wells' first Police Department is shown on horseback here. On the far left is Jim Barrett, Chief, and in the middle is Paul Granbury. The man on the right remains unknown. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", page 153. The picture appears to have been taken at the photographer's souvenir picture stand on the donkey trail about halfway up East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys for the trail; but he was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife took over the photographer's stand. They built a rock house, here as a background, for souvenir pictures.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View of Mineral Wells]

[A View of Mineral Wells]

Date: January 11, 1919
Creator: unknown
Description: A panoramic view of Mineral Wells, possibly taken from East Mountain. This picture was sent to A.F. Weaver, in 1975, from Charles Windell Simonds of Norman, Oklahoma, with a note indicating they were taken by his father (Clarence Winfield Simonds) on January 11,1919. The view appears to be from East Mountain looking southwest. A power plant is visible in the right center of this picture, but other landmarks have not been identified.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue (west of the Crazy Water Well and second Crazy Drinking Pavilion) is shown here. The number "1921" on the picture appears to refer to some sort of set It is not a date. Please note the complete absence of automobiles in the picture, and the unhitched buggy to the right foreground. (The gasoline powered "Dinky Car" tracks, which served this area of NW 1st Avenue from 1905 to 1909, are not visible here, nor does the street appear to be paved. The city streets were paved in 1914.) A more modern brick building was added to this wooden pavilion in 1909; both structures are visible in pictures taken during a Woodmen of the World convention in 1911. (Note: The newer Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning when the second Carlsbad Pavilion shut down operations during World War II.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library