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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1900-1909
[The Carlsbad Well:  Second Building]

[The Carlsbad Well: Second Building]

Date: 1908?
Creator: unknown
Description: The original Carlsbad water pavilion, a two-story wooden building at 415 NW 1st Avenue (directly across the street and west of the Crazy pavilion) was built in the mid-1890's. This second pavilion, a red-brick building, replaced the original one at the same location. The Mineral Wells Scenic Railway ran its gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" from 1905 to 1909 each quarter-hour on tracks that led north on N.W. 1st Avenue, and turned west on NW 6th Street. The Ben Hur was the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars". This picture was taken before the stained glass windows were installed in the pavilion, and before the Dinky Car tracks were removed. The pavilion was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its laundry and dry cleaning in the 1930's after the Carlsbad closed.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Carlsbad Well:  First Building]

[The Carlsbad Well: First Building]

Date: September 19, 1907
Creator: unknown
Description: The first Carlsbad Well drinking pavilion was built about 1895. The Carlsbad (also known as the Texas Carlsbad Well), one of the early drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife/ Makes a wife love HER husband/ Robs the divorce court of its business/ Takes the temper out of red-headed people/ Puts ginger into ginks/ And pepper into plodders." The pavilion was prominent in several pictures around the turn of the century; this picture--labeled "Sept. 19/07" in ink--was from an advertisement by the Yeager Drug Company. This early pavilion had been demolished by 1911, and replaced by a larger brick structure.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Blind Nellie at the Austin Well]

[Blind Nellie at the Austin Well]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: Colonel W. R. Austin came from Kentucky to Palo Pinto County about 1880, and settled on Staggs Prairie. When an infection in his eye responded to mineral water treatment, he established the Austin Well, later operated by his son-in-law, Tom Sims. Blind Nellie was a fixture of the Austin Well for years. She had an interesting history: A cowboy rode her into town one day, and auctioned her off to the highest bidder, J.H. Coleman, who bid a dollar and a half for her. Then Bob Kyle took Coleman's bargain off his hands, but Colonel Austin was the one who profited most from her when he devised a method that used her to "pump" water from his well. This unique method of bringing water to the surface was an added attraction at the Austin. Instead of drawing it up by hand or using a power pump, Blind Nellie was trained to walk around in circles, pulling the water up from below. She would pause long enough for the water to empty and, as if on a hidden cue, would go around again as the receptacle was lowered back into the well, repeating her performance accurately each time. In later years, ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Lower End of Mesquite St.

Lower End of Mesquite St.

Date: 1900-05?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue), taken in 1910, and looking south-east. The scene shows horse-drawn wagons loaded with cotton bales. Electrical lines are visible. The building at the northeast corner of East Hubbard Street and South Mesquite Street is the D.M. Howard Block. D. M Howard was the first of five Howard brothers to come to Mineral Wells and establish businesses. There was a Dry Goods store on the left end of the building, a millinery shop above it, and a grocery store was in the building to the right. Later the J.M. Belcher Furniture occupied the building; and still later, R&W Furniture. Demolition of the building began March 17 of 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan Building and a parking lot. The First State Bank now [2007] occupies this entire block.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells

Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells

Date: 1905?
Creator: unknown
Description: Two contiguous negatives, taken from East Mountain, looking Southwest are shown here. Please note that some landmarks have been numbered in ink on the photographs. On the first [upper] photograph (No. 3), the pavilion with the steeple on the roof,is the Hawthorne well, located at 314 NW 1st Ave. (No. 4), the large two-story structure, is the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Lithia Pavilion is the structure between the Hawthorne and Crazy pavilions. Note also the Hawthorn House (No. 5?), located on North Oak. The large livery stable in the left foreground has not been identified by name. Please note the Poston Building on the second [lower] photograph, on North Oak (not numbered, but the three-part building in the middle left of the photograph). Also, please note the two steeples of the first Catholic Church on NW 3rd Street, in the 600 block, on the side of West Mountain. The large two-story frame hotel (No. 2) in the left foreground has not been identified.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]

[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]

Date: 1905?/1912?
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Independent. (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 1, Ed. 1 Friday, January 19, 1900

The Independent. (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 1, Ed. 1 Friday, January 19, 1900

Date: January 19, 1900
Creator: unknown
Description: Weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Crazy Well at Mineral Wells, Texas

Crazy Well at Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1908
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the Crazy Well drinking pavilion, as it appeared around 1908, looking at the North and East (back) sides, after remodeling and the removal of a residence. The house was removed still stands at 715 NW 1st Avenue. The photograph was taken across Oak Avenue. Note the top of the first Texas Carlsbad Well in the background.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Daily Index

The Daily Index

Date: 1902?-05-(06)?
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Palo Pinto County Star. (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 25, No. 16, Ed. 1 Friday, November 9, 1900

Palo Pinto County Star. (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 25, No. 16, Ed. 1 Friday, November 9, 1900

Date: November 9, 1900
Creator: Son, J. C.
Description: A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library