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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Buggy in front of Presbyterian Church]

[A Buggy in front of Presbyterian Church]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: A copy of this picture is found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", Second Edition", on page 188. The caption states "Cumberland Presbyterian Church at 901 North Oak Avenue." Note the surrey with the fringe on top. The person in the buggy has been identified as Mrs. Flora Howard, daughter of William Winfield Hayworth "Howard", the minister of the church. Howard owned a hardware store, going under the name "W.W. Howard." He is also listed as a member of the I.O.O.F. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church takes its name from Cumberland Street, Pennsylvania, where the sub-denomination was founded. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church is currently [2014] in Newberry, Texas. The building was sold to the Church of Christ, torn down and rebuilt. The North Oak Church of Christ still stands [in 2011] at this location, 901 N. Oak Ave. The picture is reliably dated to have been taken in 1912.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]

[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The 1936 ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the new brick highway between Weatherford and Mineral Wells, now U.S. Highway 180, is depicted here. This photograph was taken just seconds before the photograph found on page 97 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS..." 2nd edition. Some of the dignitaries in the photograph are Allen Wallace, W.A. Ross, Pat Corrigan and Paul Woods. The new highway to Weatherford began at the 900 block of East Hubbard, and the brick was hand-laid by two strong Negro men.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]

[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This house, now [2009]located at 510 SW 4th Avenue at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and 5th Street, was a part of the original Mineral Wells College. The large structure was built in 1891 at 101 NW 5th Street. The front half of it was moved to its current location, and turned into a residence around 1902. The style is Queen Anne, but without a tower. Please note the two-story wraparound porch, which is rare in all parts of the nation, except for the south. This photograph may be found on page 170 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. [For more details about the College of Mineral Wells, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."]
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Building Being Demolished]

[A Building Being Demolished]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This building, once the second Post Office, had stood at the corner of 201 SE 1st Avenue and Hubbard Street. This building was subsequently demolished, and a Piggly Wiggly grocery store was located there. As of March 2, 2009, the site was occupied by the Dollar General Store. This picture may be found in A.F. Weaver's "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on p. 149
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]

[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. The style of the house is Queen Anne sub-type Free Classic. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[416 NW 6th Street]

[416 NW 6th Street]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1906 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. The house was purchased in 1917 by the attorney of Mrs. Wylie, Judge W.H. Gross. It was known as "The Gross House" until Mrs. Gross' death in 1952. The Luther Waddy family subsequently became owners. The next people to purchase the house were Mr. and Mrs. Jack Catrett in 2006. There are 10 rooms and 8 fireplaces (all coal-burning), each one unique, and believed to have been imported. There are many stained- and leaded-glass windows. This view is of the front, southern elevation of the house. The photograph was take in June of 1975. The style of the house is Queen Anne, sub-type Free Classic. The shaped parapet on the tower, and the parapets on the gables are taken from the sub-type Patterned Masonry. A rectangular tower (more readily visible in the next photograph)is very unusual in this type of architecture (round, square, or polygonal towers are more common). However, the shape may have been dictated by the use of cement blocks, which was a new material in this time Another view of the house may be found in "Time Was...", by ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Tygrett House]

[The Tygrett House]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Tygrett Hotel, built as a Room-and-Board Hotel about 1910, is still located at 415 NW 4th Street. The house is named "Silk Stocking Row" at this time [2008], and is currently Mineral Wells' only Bed and Breakfast Inn. The house is Queen Anne style, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual two-story wrap-around porch and the the polygonal tower. The Palladian windows and classic columns are characteristic of this sub-type. This photograph appears on page 105 of the "Time Was"..., Second Edition.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]

[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]

Date: 1938
Creator: unknown
Description: Fishermen stand below a cataract of the spillway of Lake Mineral Wells. The photograph was taken in 1938. On the reverse of the picture is the and-written legend: Picture taken by A. F. Weaver. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 112.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 [An Un-named Water Well]

[An Un-named Water Well]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Since the mineral water that was needed for commercial purposes did not flow in convenient springs, it was necessary to pump it out of the ground by way of wells. The wells were abandoned when the fad for the water evaporated. For example, what remains of this water well(only its head)is at the North West corner of NW 9th Street and NW 3rd Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]

[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library