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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [103], No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 18, 1980
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417302/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 90, No. 44, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 15, 1967
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417313/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [102], No. [20], Ed. 1 Thursday, November 16, 1978
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417296/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 71, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 20, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417290/
Palo Pinto County Advance (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 47, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 7, 1964
Weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417284/
Palo Pinto County Star. (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 25, No. 16, Ed. 1 Friday, November 9, 1900
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417298/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 18, Ed. 1 Friday, October 27, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417286/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 74, No. 4, Ed. 1 Friday, July 13, 1951
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417289/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 80, No. 46, Ed. 1 Friday, May 10, 1957
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417295/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 7 of 21: The Parking Lot Behind the Hotel]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 Christmas Season. The Damron was originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire was covered extensively by free-lance photographers. The hotel was formerly located on at 109 W. Hubbard Street, on the corner of the block that included SW 1st Avenue and SW 1st Street. This picture was taken during the later stages of the fire, and shows the gutted rear of the hotel, with huge flames still burning in the front portion of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29898/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 4 of 21, Fire Inside the Structure]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire received extensive photographic coverage. Note the height of the flames in this picture, taken in the later stages of the fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29900/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 19, Ed. 1 Friday, November 3, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417303/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 32, Ed. 1 Friday, February 9, 1945
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417282/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 61, No. 27, Ed. 1 Friday, December 24, 1937
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417299/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 66, No. 6, Ed. 1 Friday, July 31, 1942
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417304/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 68, No. 13, Ed. 1 Friday, September 15, 1944
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417287/
Palo Pinto County Star (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 74, No. 1, Ed. 1 Friday, June 22, 1951
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417283/
Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex[as]
Shown here is a photograph titled "Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex." It shows the completed building of the Oxford Hotel, and First State Bank and Trust Company, located at Oak and Hubbard. Note the period automobile. Written under the picture is: "I was just getting along alright [sic] write and let me know [lacuna?] you all are getting along. Will go to Wichita Falls next wk" [Signature illegible] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16208/
The "Ben Hur"
The "Ben Hur" motor car is shown on Mesquite Street (the 200 block of NE 1st Avenue), Mineral Wells, Texas. This new and larger gasoline-powered car joined two "Dinky Cars" (Esther and Susie--named for the daughters of the railroad's co-owner, banker Cicero Smith) on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park and Scenic Railway in 1908. The railway ceased operation in 1909, a year after the larger car was added to the fleet. Mineral Wells was probably one of the few cities in the United States which had gasoline-powered street cars. One of the boys shown standing beside it is Mr. Whatley of automobile fame. This photograph is shown on page 74 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition. The Scenic Railway, on which the "Dinky Cars" operated, was owned by banker Cicero Smith; and Ed Dismuke, owner of the Famous Water Company. It carried passengers every quarter-hour from Mineral Wells around the south flank of West Mountain to the recreation area of Lake Pinto. A 'round trip fare was fifteen cents. Dismuke's Famous Mineral Water wells were located around Lake Pinto, and water was pumped over the mountain to the Famous Water Company and its drinking pavilion. The building on the left edge of the picture with the arched windows was M.H. Coleman's Clothing and Shoes for gentlemen. It was later occupied by Wallace Distributing Company. The building still stands diagonally northwest across NE 1st. Avenue from the Baker Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16317/
Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells
Two contiguous negatives, taken from East Mountain, looking Southwest are shown here. Please note that some landmarks have been numbered in ink on the photographs. On the first [upper] photograph (No. 3), the pavilion with the steeple on the roof,is the Hawthorne well, located at 314 NW 1st Ave. (No. 4), the large two-story structure, is the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Lithia Pavilion is the structure between the Hawthorne and Crazy pavilions. Note also the Hawthorn House (No. 5?), located on North Oak. The large livery stable in the left foreground has not been identified by name. Please note the Poston Building on the second [lower] photograph, on North Oak (not numbered, but the three-part building in the middle left of the photograph). Also, please note the two steeples of the first Catholic Church on NW 3rd Street, in the 600 block, on the side of West Mountain. The large two-story frame hotel (No. 2) in the left foreground has not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16214/
Casino
This photograph may be found on page 87 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. He identifies it as "The Casino and Fiddler's Bandstand at Elmhurst Park." The park was southwest of Mineral Wells. Some of the photograph appears to have been re-touched. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20401/
[A Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells is shown here. The picture is a composite of two views taken from East Mountain. Attached to the composite is a date "1901." The large building in the front middle of the picture is the Holloway & Haley livery stable. Some of the buildings are numbered on the photograph. Recognizable are: (2) The Hawthorn Well, with steeple (Right middle of the picture), (4) The original Crazy water drinking pavilion (two-story with smaller upper third floor, right middle of picture), The Lythia Well (between the Crazy Well and the Hawthorn Well), and The Hexagon House at the far right edge of picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20324/
[A District Baptist Meeting]
This is a picture taken by A.F. Weaver during the District Baptist Meeting of 1964, held at the high school football stadium on the west side of town. Miller Stadium, where this photograph was taken, has been replaced by a new one at the High School complex on the east side of town as of March, 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29976/
[A Donkey on 6th Street Mineral Wells, 1916]
Donkeys were still prevalent in 1916, and so were the grass-grown steel tracks of the "Dinky Cars" (Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway which had ceased operations in 1909) on NW 6th Street. The house to the left is an example of the architecture of this time. The source of the photograph is A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." first edition, 1975, on page 82. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24998/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 1 of 11: Wood Pile and Building]
The third building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; it was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished for the current building. The First Baptist church was originally located in a frame building on the southwest corner of the Crazy block in 1883. A second church was built at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and West Hubbard Street, facing SW 4th Avenue. It was a frame building with two steeples. A brick church, facing Hubbard Street, was erected to accommodate the congregation in 1920. These photographs illustrate the demolition of this building. The present church was erected in 1967 at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and SW 1st Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29915/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 2 of 11: Another Angle]
The first house of worship of the congregation of First Baptist Church, located in the southwest corner of the Crazy Well block, was purchased in 1883 and was used until 1900. The First Baptist Church was re-located to the corner of W. Hubbard and Pecan Street (now SE 4th Avenue) in 1900, and used until 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29914/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 11 of 11: Partially Demolished]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29905/
[A Discus Throw at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph appears to be of a discus-throwing competition at Elmhurst Park. ("Elmhurst Park" is written on the back of the photograph.) A gentleman on the right, leaning on the fence, appears to be holding a tape measure. Please note the spectators on the roof of the building in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20322/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 7 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The First Baptist Church's second building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third, and current, church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29909/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 8 of 11: Frame of Building]
The second building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was then demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29908/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 9 of 11: Workers]
Workers are shown helping to demolish the First Baptist Church building in 1967. It was built in 1920. The current building is the third First Baptist Church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29907/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 10 of 11: Frame and Rubble]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29906/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 5 of 11: Looking Northeast.]
The church building, shown here as being demolished, was built in 1920; and was replaced in 1967 by the present church building. It is the third Baptist church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29911/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 6 0f 11: Frame ]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; and used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see photograph number 1 for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29910/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 3 of 11: East View]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, when it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church is the third one built in the same location. Please see Number 1 of this collection for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29913/
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 4 of 11: The Beginning]
The second home of the congregation of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920. It was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished. The current First Baptist Church building was built in the same location. Please see Number 1 in this series for details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29912/
[The "Doodle Bug" Interior]
This photograph illustrates the interior of a McKeen motor car, known locally as a "Doodle Bug", with its dust-proof round windows. This one, owned by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, was an 81-passenger, 70-foot-long, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, motor coach. It traveled from Graford through Oran and Salesville to Mineral Wells, thence on to Dallas. It made a round trip daily from 1912 to 1929. There was a turntable at Graford to turn the coach around. There were two "Doodle Bugs" on the WMW&NW. The third similar coach, owned by the Gulf, Texas and Western Railroad (GT&W), traveled from Seymour through Guthrie, and Jacksboro to Salesville beginning in 1913. It proceeded thence over the WMW&NW track to Mineral Wells, and on to Dallas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20357/
[Downtown Mineral Wells, 2 of 3: A Different View]
This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells shows (left to right): Hill's Ladies' Apparel; Cole's House of flowers; (Intersecting street): George's Man's Shop; the Professional Building (formerly the Texas Theater); Poston's Dry Goods;Palace Saloon; Marsden's Shoe Store (former Gem theater). The Crazy Hotel is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29838/
Elmhurst Park
This illustration appears to be a picture postcard of the entrance to Elmhurst Park, an amusement park on Pollard Creek, about five miles southwest of Mineral Wells. The park operated from 1907 to 1913, and was a major attraction in "the nation's most popular health spa" at that time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20326/
[An Engraving of a Crowd of Men]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60964/
[An Early Couple]
This picture is probably a photographic portrait of Col. and Mrs. W.R. Austin, mentioned on page 54 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." second edition. He established the Austin Well where "Blind Nellie" was employed. See also, [Col. and Mrs. W. Riess Austin] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20239/
[An Early Delivery Truck]
An early delivery truck, whose wording (on the side reads) "R.O. Norman, Tailor, Cleaning & Pressing, phone 514", is shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20454/
[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]
Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory." The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II. Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells. The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original camp (now on the propery of Mineral Wells High School) is still visited by those who were stationed there--and by those World War II prisoners who were interned in Mineral Wells. The Texas Historical Commission recognizes its significance with a marker. The "new" Camp Wolters was located farther east in 1941. It has also had many uses: The U.S. Army IRTC; (Infantry Replacement Training Center) in World War II; Wolters Air Force Base in the early 1950's. It was returned to the army in 1956, and re-named Fort Wolters in 1963. It was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School (USAPHS)during the Vietnam War in 1966. The entrance to the original Camp Wolters was constructed of native sandstone with red-clay-tile roofs. Part of the property was distributed to Mineral Wells and Weatherford after Fort Wolters was decommissioned following the Vietnam War. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38085/
[The Donkey Trail up East Mountain - 1901]
A trail ride, going up East Mountain on burros, is pictured here. The participants listed on back of picture are: "Jessie Padgett - Dallas, Mr. Oscar Levin, Miss [unidentified], Mr. Coy Wimberly - Tyler, Miss [unidentified], Miss Burriss - Terrel, Mr. Jacobs - Atlanta, Lilian Webster - Dallas, Raymond Caruth - Dallas, Johnetta Armstrong - Dallas, Mr. Cousins - Tyler, Maggie Street - Dallas, Katie Elliott - Dallas, Miss Hyman - Min. Wells, Mr. Nance - Dallas, Mr. Brown - Tyler, Mary Roberts - Terrel, Will Caruty - Dallas. Mineral Wells, June 11, 1901." Burro rides on the Donkey Trail up East Mountain were a popular pastime around the turn of the twentieth century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25001/
[An Early Car at the Crazy Well Flats]
Frank Richards (The driver, identified as "Dad"), manager of the Star Well in Mineral Wells, sits in an automobile in front of the Crazy Flats sometime before 1912. Dust on the car, extra spare tires, and a sign on the spare, indicate they have just completed a "Pathfinder Endurance" run for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The driver and passenger are dressed in typical "duster" clothing for cross-country travel. A cigar sign in the window indicates this was the drug store, then located in the southeast corner of the Crazy Flats. A sign on the hotel also advertises rooms for rent in addition to its being a mineral water drinking pavilion. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25082/
[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]
A very early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken around 1882) from East Mountain and looking southwest is illustrated here. Locations identified by numbers are: 1: Judge Lynch's cabin, now Lynch Plaza at S. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Street; 2: The Mesquite Street well, middle of NE 1st Avenue (the second well in town, now [2008] abandoned); 3:The current center of downtown Mineral Wells, showing the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180); 4: The current Fire and Police Departments; 5: S. Oak Avenue; 6: The Southern House Hotel; 7: The present "Business District", NE 1st Avenue; and 8: N. Oak Avenue (a residential area at the time.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20219/
The Fair Grounds and Race Track, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a picture of a dirt horse-race track and fair grounds,located southeast of town. It is not known if thoroughbred horses raced, but sulkies are known to have raced here. This course was the first of its kind in Mineral Wells. Another track was constructed at Elmhurst Park, in the southeast part of town, after this one was torn down. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20364/
[A Fire in Mineral Wells, Texas]
This picture is probably a photograph of the fire which destroyed the Delaware Hotel (Formerly known as the St. Nicholas Hotel) on North Oak Avenue at NE 3rd Street. The open ditch in the right foreground shows that the streets were not paved, indicating that the fire occurred prior to 1914. The pump-and-ladder fire wagon used to battle the fire was drawn by two beautiful white horses named Joe and Frank. The hotel was never rebuilt. The standing building in the photograph is Mineral Wells Grain and Feed, but its location has not been confirmed. The signification of the number "6" on the picture invites conjecture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29830/
[The First Air-Mail Service to Mineral Wells]
The first batch of airmail arrived in Mineral Wells, 1947, 6:30 pm. Individuals from left are: John Chamberlain, Manager of the Chamber of Commerce, Fred Parnell, Bill Cameron, of the Index, Fred Brown, Manager of the Baker Hotel, Mayor John Miller, an unidentified pilot, D.C. Harris, Postmaster (holding the mail bag) and R. T. Jones. The airplane in the background, a Cessna 190, was probably the one used to transport the mail. It appeared to be a cold day, as the officials are all wearing coats. (A negative accompanying this picture depicted a "Christmas rush at the old Post Office") texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20227/
[The First Boy Scouts in Mineral Wells, 1902]
A note on back of this photograph states, "1902, 1st Boy Scouts in Mineral Wells, organized by Frank Creighton (L) met in old Sangcura Sprudel Well Pavilion." The picture was taken in front of Green's Transfer Building. This photograph possibly shows the youth division of a local lodge, probably Shriners. Please note the military-style stripes and guns. This historic photograph captures a precursor to the Boy Scout movement, that started six years later in England. It spread to America in 1910 to generate an interest in outdoor and educational activities among teen-age boys. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25062/