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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters
Shown here is a booklet of 15 folios, 9 1/4" x 6 1/8", detailing life for the inmates of Camp Wolters. The booklet displays no copyright date, but the illustrations strongly suggest World War II. The booklet is in poor condition, and it is probably perishing from old age. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39261/
DUPLICATE OF The Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building." It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. A vintage automobile is shown at right side of the picture. This building was demolished before 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16178/
[Pediment on the Second Building of the First Presbyterian Church]
This photograph shows the pediment of the south-west entrance to the First Presbyterian Church (This is its third building) at 300 NW 4th Avenue. The acanthus ornaments on top of the pediment (in Classical times, a guard against dripping rain), have no real function. The dentils that line the interior of the pediment are not Classical, nor are the capitals of of the pillars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25011/
The Davis Wells; The Davis Baths
Pictured here is a semi-ornate brick building (with a socle presumably of stone), advertising the Davis Wells and the Davis Baths. This enterprise is not listed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." The picture appears to have been excerpted from a larger photograph, as the legend "Davis Baths" (not visible in the picture) appears on the negative. Polk's Directory for 1920 lists "Davis Mineral Baths" (proprietor, Dr. Eldred A.--the "A" stands for "Albany"--Davis) at "210 1/2 N. Oak Avenue." The business cannot be found in the 1909 or 1914 Polk's Directories. However, the 1914 Polk's Directory shows a Dr. Davis as living at 514 East Throckmorton [presently, in 2014, NE 1st Street] with his wife, Helen. The name of the bath house was changed to the "Buck Head" (or "Buckhead", as some sources have it) at some as yet unknown date. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60884/
[Baker Hotel Grounds' View]
Here is a view of Baker Hotel from across its grounds. Note: There are umbrellas around swimming pool, but the swimming pool itself is out of view. Foliage includes Canna flowers and cedar trees. An unidentified woman and child are in foreground. On April 30, 1963, Earl Baker formally closed the hotel. The property went under the hammer that August. The rest is history. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39162/
Jack Amlung
The band in this photograph is identified as "Jack Amlung." It consists of nine players, including its leader. The instruments visible are: A sousaphone; two (?)pianos; a violin; an alto saxophone; a clarinet, a guitar, a bass viol; percussion. Further information about this band is, sadly, lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39164/
[A Buffet Table]
A buffet table, presumably in the Baker Hotel, is shown ready for guests to use it. Its opulence would reflect the quality of the Baker Hotel. The exact location of this buffet table is [2014] unknown. An ice sculpture of a sleigh and reindeer suggests a Christmas occasion. Further details are lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39161/
[Hubbard Street/Crazy Sign]
This picture affords a view of Hubbard Street, in Mineral Wells, Texas,looking east. Please note the sign above street, "Welcome to Mineral Wells, Home of Crazy." The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958, to the general consternation of the public. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39160/
[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60942/
[Ashburn Ice Cream Company]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60943/
Malsby Dairy Construction
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60941/
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60945/
[View from NW Mountain looking East]
View from NW mountain looking East. North Oak Community center is visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60949/
[Baum-Carlock-Bumgardner Funeral Home Burial Records]
Report containing information pertaining to dead of Mineral Wells, Texas. This includes names, birth dates, dates of death, relations, and location of burial site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477569/
Archive Search Report Findings: Camp Wolters
Report describing munitions found during cleanup operations at Camp Wolters. This report also includes descriptions and maps of the area. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477568/
Former Camp Wolters Historical Aerial Photographic Analysis, June 2002
Report containing aerial photography of the Hayes and Marsden Roads area of Mineral Wells, Texas, for the purpose of mapping historical locations of Camp Wolters onto the modern landscape. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477570/
[Baum-Carlock-Bumgardner Funeral Home Burial Records]
Report containing information pertaining to dead of Mineral Wells, Texas. This includes names, birth dates, dates of death, relations, and location of burial site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477566/
Time Critical Removal Action, The Former Camp Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas, Final Report
Report containing information regarding the cleanup activities at the Camp Wolters area in Texas. Includes forms with daily activities and weekly reports. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477571/
Gordon Weekly Courier. (Gordon, Tex.), Vol. 3, No. 41, Ed. 1 Friday, May 20, 1887
Weekly newspaper from Gordon, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth540720/
Former Camp Wolters Historical Aerial Photographic Analysis, June 2003
Report containing aerial photography of portions of Parker and Palo Pinto Counties, Texas, for the purpose of mapping historical locations of Camp Wolters onto the modern landscape. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477573/
Former Camp Wolters Public Meeting Minutes, Mineral Wells, Texas, February 24, 2003
Document containing minutes from a public meeting wherein the public of Mineral Wells is informed about the history of Camp Wolters and plans to clean the site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477567/
Gordon Weekly Courier. (Gordon, Tex.), Vol. 30, No. 42, Ed. 1 Friday, August 7, 1914
Weekly newspaper from Gordon, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth540576/
[Mineral Wells Steam Laundry]
An edition of the Mineral Wells Daily Index for May 6, 1902 (Volume VIII, Number 1) states that the Steam Laundry had already been in operation for six years. A certain J. W. Beasley was listed as the manager. The article associated with the photograph of the Steam Laundry goes on to state that "2 additions have been added." It continues to boast much the same ornaments of the trade as do more modern-day laundries: "Thoroughly modern equipment", "A...competent staff", and "The best" service available anywhere in the city. "Pure, artesian [sic] water" was reputed to have been used in the cleaning process. A legend on the back of this photograph reads: "200 Block of NE 7th St." (The Daily Index of 1902 gives the address as "North Wichita Street.") texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39199/
[402 SW 5th Street]
A Victorian home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here at 402 SW 5th Street. Please note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and wraparound porch. The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, suggesting that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16167/
Woodmen of the World Camp Meeting , June 19, 1947
A white-ink legend on the face of this photograph reads: Woodman [sic] of the World Camp Meeting----6-19-47 Mineral Wells, Texas. phillips [sic] photographic [sic] Service [sic] A typed legend on the back of the photograph reads: WOW MEETING 6-19-47 held in Convention Hall. Recognized Front [sic] row from left: #1 Ezra Wortham. #5 Charlie Sheridan, #6 George Oliver 3rd. Row standing #1 John Birdwell, #5 Louis Fryer, #6 John Miller, #7 Ben Yeager, #12 Bill Teichman. 4th row: #1 Charlie Langley #15 Roy Langley [Unreadable deletions in green ink above appear this caption] This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39237/
[D. W. Griffith]
D. W. Griffith is shown standing on the roof of the new Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927 and replaced the First Crazy Hotel which had burned in 1925. Mr. Griffith, who produced silent movies including the "Keystone Kops" comedies, and the classic film "Birth of a Nation", was a guest at the Crazy Hotel while visiting Mineral Wells in 1929. A commemorative postage stamp was issued in his honor on May 27, 1975. Local folklore has it that Mr. Griffith was impressed by the "WELCOME" sign on East Mountain (the world's largest non-commercial, electrically-lighted sign at the time). He developed the "HOLLYWOOD HILLS" addition with other partners when he returned to California, and he erected what is probably the most recognizable landmark in America: The HOLLYWOOD sign now graces Los Angeles. Both signs have survived similar difficult times in their histories. This picture appears on page 19 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, 1974. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38073/
[The Welcome Sign]
The WELCOME Sign (shown here) was built in 1922 by George Holmgren, the Texas Rotary Club's Governor,in his San Antonio iron works following the State Rotary Club's Convention in Mineral Wells. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain what was, at the time, the world's largest non-commercial lighted sign. The original incandescent bulbs were later replaced with lower-maintenance red neon lights by the Mineral Wells Jaycees. A Warrant Officer Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from its original site on East Mountain to the east side of Bald Mountain (now called Welcome Mountain), overlooking Elmwood Cemetery, in 1972. It remains there today [2008], lighted at its base with flood lights, to greet visitors coming from the east. This is a picture, taken in 1972, of the restored sign. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29410/
[Will Rogers at the Baker Hotel]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29806/
[Two women in a Wheelbarrow]
Two unknown young ladies are shown posing in a wheelbarrow in Wylie Park, located in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street (for the same photograph, please see page 115 of "Time Was", second edition). Wylie Park seems to have been a project of the local ladies' garden Club, who developed various empty areas around town into garden plots. The first Catholic church on the side of West Mountain appears to be barely visible in the far distance, indicating that the photograph has been taken looking to the west. The photograph unfortunately bears no date. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20427/
[The Tygrett House]
The Tygrett Hotel, built as a Room-and-Board Hotel about 1910, is still [2008] located at 415 NW 4th Street. The house is named "Silk Stocking Row" at this time [2008], and is currently Mineral Wells' only Bed and Breakfast Inn. The house is Queen Anne style, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual two-story wrap-around porch and the the polygonal tower. The Palladian windows and classic columns are characteristic of this sub-type. This photograph appears on page 105 of the "Time Was"..., Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20289/
[W. W. Howard's Hardware Store]
The Howard Hardware store was once located at 101 E. Hubbard Street. The hanging electric lights, the tea table to the left, the double row of "air-tight" stoves ranks down the center aisle all strongly suggest that the photograph was taken in the early twentieth century. The dimness of the store makes discerning further items on sale difficult. Persons identified in picture are: Helin Howard, Flora Howard, A. L. Howard and one unidentified person. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39215/
[Walker's Grocery and Market]
Shown here is the J.J. Walker Grocery & Market, once located at 614 Southeast 6th Avenue. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 176. The identities of the three people pictured is not known at this [2015] time. Note, however, the hand-operated gasoline pumps, the oil pumps in the background, and a sign that advertises Texaco gasoline at 18 cents per gallon! texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39212/
Mineral Wells Sanitorium
An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60939/
Ten Years Younger
This picture displays the title page of a booklet about Mineral Wells, Texas health resorts, and how they could make people feel ten years younger. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth21921/
Street Parade / West Texas C. of C. Convention / Mineral Wells 1925
A parade on North Oak Avenue in Mineral Wells, Texas is the subject of this picture. Businesses partaking of it include Poston Dry Goods, a bath house, the Hexagon Hotel, Palace Drugs, American Cafe, and the Caldwell Hotel. American flags, Texas flags, and various banners are hanging from the buildings. The parade is moving south (while the picture is looking north) on N. Oak Avenue, at its intersection with SE 1st Street It was held during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention of 1925. The photograph bears the colophon of the Basil Clemens Photo Company of Breckenridge, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16301/
Standard Park
The Standard Park not only had a swimming pool, but a movie theater and dancing pavilion, as well, for the entertainment of health-seekers. A trolley to it operated at 600 North Oak Street from 1907 to 1913. (Note the Kingsley Hotel above and left of the Standard, built into the side of East Mountain--later destroyed by fire.) First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, then later as the Beach, the Standard was torn down in World War II; and a USO Club was built here for soldiers at Camp Wolters. The USO building was given to the city after the war, and renamed the North Oak Community Center. The Crazy Water Festival Committee is currently [2003] attempting to restore the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24956/
Sewing Room
The back of the photograph exhibits a note that this picture was copied from the "Burro", which is the Mineral Wells High School yearbook. The "Sewing Room" was a classroom in the Lillian Peek Home Economics building on the grounds of the high school. The Lillian Peek cottage was built by the WPA in 1937, and was the first free- standing house built specifically for Home Economics education in the State of Texas. It was "Current state of the art" when it was completed. The building now [2008] houses the Creative Arts Center, and is used by the local Art Club as an art workshop and museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25050/
[A Street Scene, Taken About the 1930's]
This photograph illustrates the "New" Crazy Hotel on North Oak Avenue, which opened in 1927 after the earlier hotel burned March 15, 1925. Many automobiles typical of the period can be seen on the street. Note the following businesses: The Tom Moore Drug Company, a barber shop, a cafe, Young's Studio, a bath house, and the Crazy Drug. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20448/
Strange Structure [article]
An article written by Maid J. Neal, in an unknown publication, describes in detail the construction and design of the Hexagon Hotel, which was built in 1895-1897 by D. G. Galbraith. See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20478/
Star House
The Star House was built about 1900,and owned by Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Ramsey. This 34-room hotel was situated at 315 Coke Street. A colophon at the bottom of the picture, barely legible, reads: "1903 Ramsey House Mineral Wells, Texas John Ramsey Ima Ramsey." This picture differs from the last one only insofar as the porch seems to have been extended across the front of the building. This photograph appears on page 105 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20294/
[A String and Drum Band]
This picture shows 18 people, 2 of whom appear to be adults. Visible are a snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, violins, lutes, bass viol and viola--and an anvil. The background appears to be painted. Further information about this band is presently [2012]lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39240/
[A Trolley Car of the] Mineral Wells Electric System
This picture shows the Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car Number 23. The Mineral Wells Electric System operated from 1902 (?) to 1913. The picture appears to have been taken in the 1400 block of W. Hubbard Street, where the street car unloaded passengers for a short hike north to Lake Pinto. The street car reversed here, and traveled across town to Elmwood Cemetery--around NE 17th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16266/
[The Thompson House, at 215 NE 2nd Street]
Shown here is a photograph of the front of the Thompson House (later the "Cunningham House"), a two-story, Queen Anne-style home located at 215 NE 2nd Street in Mineral Wells, Texas, just north of the Baker Hotel. Architectural elements include decorative woodwork around the eaves in the gable ends and across the front porch. A cupola serves in place of the tower that is characteristic of Queen Anne styles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16175/
Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3: People on Porch]
An early picture (probably taken from a newspaper) of the Texas Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. It stood across the street west of the Crazy Well and its first Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The large, two story Second Crazy Pavilion, built adjacent, and to the south of the first one, faced west toward the Carlsbad. The Carlsbad had been replaced by a brick structure by 1909. Stained glass windows were later added to the building that depicted Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water that "Makes a man love HIS wife. "Makes a wife love HER husband, "Robs the divorce court of its business, "Takes the temper out of red-headed people, "Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." (Please see the picture one down, but one, for a better view of it.) This is the second picture of this image. The first one has been cropped, and does not show the outer parts of the picture. The third one is a slightly clearer picture. A colophon on the lower left corner reads: "Evans Photo Min Wells Tex" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24978/
[The Una McLaughlin Home]
The "Una McLaughlin" home is located on NW 23rd Street. This photograph was taken in July, 1975. Built in 1927 by J.C. Cunningham, an oil operator. The home was sold in 1931 to Judge E.B. Ritchie. It was purchased in 1973 by Una McLaughlin. It has since changed hands several times. It is presently [2014] vacant. The tile in the living room fireplace is the same as used in the Baker Hotel. The tile, stained glass in the breakfast room, and the light fixtures are in the Art Deco style. The architectural style of the house is Italian Renaissance. It shows signs of remodeling. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16174/
[Three Old-Time Stores]
This picture appears to show three stores that stand cheek-by-jowl. A saddlery on the far left shares space with a furniture store--and an undertaker's establishment on the far right. The sign over the stores combines their functions in a way that would--under other circumstances--seem comical. The building itself was located at the corner of SE 1st, and South Oak Streets. A note on the photograph states that it was south of the MARTIN BUILDING. It was once the McBrayer-Armstrong Grocery, then later the Nash Hardware store. The location of Lattner eventually became the Buy-Rite store [116 South Oak Avenue, at the corner of SE 1st Street, until some time in the early 1980's]. The road is unpaved, there is no evidence of lighting--except for the lamp mounted on a post at the front of the building. The horse-drawn hearse (without its horse or plumes) suggests that although it was in front of the stores, it was not at the time in use. The picture, therefore, dates from the end of the 19th century--or the earliest 20th century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60925/
[Twenty Men and One Woman in Front of a Building]
Illustrated here are 20 unidentified men (some in uniform) and 1 unidentified woman standing in front of an unidentified building. Four of the men have removed their hats. The prevalence of uniforms suggests either the military or the police. The high boots worn by two of the men (and the hats that some of the have), the dress of the woman all suggest an early 1920's date for the photograph. The occasion that brought them to that place is not known. The photograph taken by Young's Studio of Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39252/
Texas Trade Review
An early street scene showing buildings and a horse-drawn wagon. Written in lower left corner is "Texas Trade Review." The sign over the sidewalk reads "D.M. Howard." There were several D.M. Howard stores (see page 122 in "Time Was...", second edition). This scene was probably on Mesquite Street in the 100 block. It is undated, but the unpaved road, and the horse-drawn wagon, suggest the latter part of the nineteenth century. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20303/
[Three Women and a Man In Front of a Car]
Three unknown women and a man are shown standing in front of a large automobile. The man sports a celluloid collar & a straw hat. One lady carries a reticule, another an umbrella. Benches are visible behind them all. The date of the picture is also unknown, but the early 'twenties of the twentieth century is conjectured. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39247/
[Photograph of the First Mineral Wells Golf Country Club]
Photograph of the first clubhouse of The Mineral Wells Golf and Country Club is shown here. This picture comes from Knights of Pythias Album, 1925. The swimming area and lifeguard station can be seen at the far left of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20348/