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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 [A Man, A Woman and a Portrait]

[A Man, A Woman and a Portrait]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Ruby Shattles (Mrs. Jesse Shattles) presents a portrait of Achilles Corcanges to Mr. Corcanges, founder & owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studios at 412 North Oak. This picture may be found in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Inspiration Point

Inspiration Point

Date: 1950~
Creator: unknown
Description: The label on the photograph reads both "Possum Kingdom Dam" and "Inspiration Point". A. F. and Patsy Weaver are shown enjoying the view from Inspiration Point. A.F. Weaver himself took the photograph, using a tripod and camera timer,in the same vicinity where he had proposed to Patsy Weaver years before this photograph was taken. In the early part of the twentieth century,the internationally known evangelist, Billy Sunday, visited Mineral Wells. He was told about an outstanding view from a vantage point south of town. On seeing the vista for himself,the Rev. Sunday remarked it was truly an inspirational view. Since that time the viewpoint has been known as "Inspiration Point". This vista is seven miles south of Mineral Wells off US Highway 281, and approximately 40 miles below the Morris Sheppard Dam at Possum Kingdom Lake. It has been called one of the most beautiful scenic views in Texas. This picture has possibly been used in the course of the advertising of interesting things to see and do around Mineral Wells, which might explain the label attached to the photograph. Similarly captivating is a view from "Observation Point" the Dam at Possum Kingdom Lake. The two vistas, some 20 to ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brick Factory]

[The Brick Factory]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The abundant clay in and around Palo Pinto County was recognized around the turn of the 20th century as a source of raw material for brick manufacturing. Rejected fine coal from the area's coal mines furnished heat to fire the clay and bake it into brick. This brick factory in far western Parker County, near the Rock Creek coal mine, was a major industry in Mineral Wells. The factory was first opened on January 21 of 1921. The factory is in full operation in this photograph, with train cars on the tracks and bricks stacked along the rail area awaiting shipment. Area-made bricks were used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave both the highway from Mineral Wells to Ft. Worth as well as many of the streets in in that city, and to pave Congress Avenue in Austin.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Paving Brick Plant

Paving Brick Plant

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a photograph of the Paving Brick Plant. In the lower right-hand corner is the legend: Young Studio Mineral Wells, Tex." It was established in 1921; electrified in 1925-1926; the company was sold in 1927, re-named "Reliance Brick Company." It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 162. Electrification was accomplished when the Texas Power and Light Company furnished an abandoned 500 h.p. stream-power plant for the job. It was fed natural gas by means of the Upham Gas Company's line. In 1927, the plant was the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi River, confining its production exclusively to vitrified shale material. The manager in 1927 has been identified as A. E. Eaton, who was also instrumental in locating the plant in Mineral Wells.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Yeager Building]

[The Yeager Building]

Date: 1993
Creator: unknown
Description: A stone building named "Yeager Block" on the corner of NE 1st Avenue and NE 1st Street is shown here. (NE 1st is the street shown in the picture. Dr. Yeager lived two blocks east--up that street--of the drugstore). Once home of (what was known to some as)"The Lion Drugstore", it had a metal statue of a lion mounted on its roof. The statue of the lion was donated to a scrap metal drive for World War II, in order to aid the war effort. At the time of this photograph, (a handwritten note on the back of the photograph gives the date as 1993), it was housing the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Yeager Building]

[The Yeager Building]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a stone building named "Yeager Block" on NE 1st Avenue. The building originally housed what was called, (by some) "The Lion Drug Store", and once had a metal statue of a lion on its roof. It housed the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left (south) of the photograph was named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back is given as 1993. The coffee shop H2JO was located on the north part of the building in 2006. Mike Chamberlain Photography was located on the north end of the block in 2006. It is now [2008] closed.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Crazy Theatre

The Crazy Theatre

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a picture of the Crazy Theater, 400 N. Oak Avenue (the present [2014]location of Bennett's Office Supply)that was taken between 1907 and 1914. The trolley tracks, which were installed in 1907, are visible on Oak Avenue. The city streets were paved in 1914, some time after this photograph was made. The building is located on the east side of the north end of the 400 block of Oak Street, and the Crazy drinking Pavilion was located on opposite (west) side of the same block.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Carlsbad of America

The Carlsbad of America

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the battered title page of a pamphlet about Mineral Wells, calling it "The Carlsbad of America." It gives the property valuation (ending in 1905), and the population of the city (also ending in 1905). A colophon at the bottom of the pamphlet remarks "Texas An Empire---A nation within a Nation." The pamphlet reports itself as the work of the Index Printing Company.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
weaver_9/AWO_1787N.002

weaver_9/AWO_1787N.002

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 The [Old] City Hall

The [Old] City Hall

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library