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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 County: Parker County, TX
[The Building of Fort Wolters]
An automobile--presumably of the late 1930's--is parked by a building in the process of being built. Workmen may be seen at the site. A legend under the original reads: "Buildings seem to literally spring from the earth when the construction of the then Camp Wolters began in November, 1940. The camp was completed in less than four months and became the nation's largest infantry Replacement Training Center. Construction cost was approximately $14,200,000." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60911/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the Civic League Island at Lake Mineral Wells, four miles east of Mineral Wells, Texas, with a rustic bridge connecting the two small islands, picnic tables, and grilles. In the foreground, there are two small boats with canopies, carrying passengers on the water of the lake. A forested shoreline is visible in the background of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39230/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
Rock Creek in Parker County was dammed up in 1919 to form Lake Mineral Wells, the third lake built as a water-supply for the popular resort town. This photograph appears to be on the east side of the lake where boat docks were located. The lake has been a popular recreation area from the beginning, and is now part of Mineral Wells State Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25092/
[Lake Mineral Wells]
This is a view from a spot near the dam looking across the lake to Ed Dismuke's Famous Water Company, where mineral water was piped to his drinking pavilion on NW 3rd Street. It was here also, that the Famous crystallizing plant, where "Pronto Lax" crystals were made, was located. Lake Pinto supplied water to the City of Mineral Wells from the time of its creation in 1902, until Rock Creek was dammed to form Lake Mineral Wells in Parker County in 1918, and completed in September of 1920. This photograph is taken from one of 17 (4X4) negatives in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds, addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography, and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20380/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 1 of 4, Flood Stage]
Lake Mineral Wells, Mineral Wells State Park, is shown here in flood stage. Heavy spring rains dumped 7.2 inches of rainfall into the area over a violent week-end in March 1976, resulting in a flood that claimed 24 lives in fire- and water-related incidents. The dam is visible on the far left side of the picture, with water flowing over it. Flood waters cover a large part of the land between the photographer and the dam. The public boat ramp and fueling station are on the peninsula at the far right side of the picture. The picture is part of a group of films labeled "1977", but related news articles give the date as March of the previous year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29919/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29917/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 4 of 4: Spillway]
Shown here is the lower end of the spillway from Lake Mineral Wells after the flood in March 1976. The dam is barely visible at the upper end of the spillway in the middle of the picture. The road directly below the dam is under water, and is not visible in any other pictures of this flood. It suffered such severe damage that it had to be rebuilt. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29916/
[A Mayor Being Pushed in a Wheelbarrow]
The visiting Mineral Wells High School football team had just defeated the Weatherford Kangaroos 21 to 6 in their annual football rivalry some time around 1940. The exact date of the event remains unknown as of 2013. Mayor George Barber of Mineral Wells, is enjoying a victor's ride, supplied by the Mayor of Weatherford, across the football field at Weatherford Stadium. The wheelbarrow, used in payment of the wager between rival mayors, is decorated for this purpose. Such whimsical wagering (and the high jinks that accompany the pay-off) is common in Texas High School football. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25080/
[Penitentiary Hollow]
A photograph of a woman and young boy at Penitentiary Hollow in Lake Mineral Wells State Park. A dam across Rock Creek east of Mineral Wells in Parker County was built to impound a new water supply for the city of Mineral Wells. A joint committee of nine named the new water source Lake Mineral Wells in December 1919. When it became necessary to dam up Palo Pinto Creek in the 1960's to obtain a larger source of water, the city gave Lake Mineral Wells to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission for a State Park. Penitentiary Hollow in the State Park is one of the few areas in Texas where rock climbers may gain mountain-climbing experience. As the photograph shows, spectacular vertical cliffs, 40 feet and more in height, are well-adapted to honing climbing skills. The area gets its name from the story that cattle thieves were thought to cache their booty there, preparatory to driving the hapless animals onward for sale. Anyone detected in the area was therefore likely to find lodging in a local penitentiary. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25094/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 1: Infantry Replacement Training Center
This volume includes a time-line of events that took place in Fort Wolters from 1921 to 1973, including biographies of personnel, photographs, diagrams and a Roster of Infantry Replacement Center Officers from 1941. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24855/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 2: Primary Helicopter Center Personnel
This volume includes a list of U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School Commandants from 1961-1973, with biographies and photographs of some personnel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24854/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 3: Primary Helicopter Center Facility
This volume includes a list of abbreviations, a list of Fort Wolters buildings and facilities (with square footage and cost of construction), a detailed history of Fort Wolters; and information on recreational activities, such as the Fort Wolter's Boots & Saddle Club, the Bowling Alley, and Skeet Range. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24853/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 4: Army Primary Helicopter School, Officer Graduation Class
This volume includes a document that was the first official written notice designating Wolters as a Fort, dated June 4, 1963. It also includes biographies, and photographs of graduating pilot classes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24852/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 5: Military Personnel: Awards, Promotions, Retirements
This volume consists of photographs of personnel receiving awards, promotions, and retirements. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24851/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 6: Civilian Personnel
This volume consists of photographs of civilian employees at Fort Wolters, with a few of their biographies. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24850/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 7: Heliports, Stagefields, Directory
This volume consists of photographs and diagrams of stage fields such as Sundance, Mustang, Rawhide, Da Nang, Phu Loi, Soc Trang, and many others. The U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School utilized approximately 1,350 square miles of airspace. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24849/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 8: Southern Airways Company, Southern Airways of Texas
This volume details the role that the Southern Airways Company played in their contracts for Fort Wolters from 1956-1968. The volume includes biographies of key administrators of Southern Airways, a list of employees, a list of reunion attendees, and a time-line of key events. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25116/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 9: Athletic Awards
This volume includes photographs showing personnel receiving trophies and other recognition for sports activities at the base, such as basketball, golf, softball, bowling, and other sports. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25115/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 10: Primary Helicopter School Training Curriculum for Officers and Candidates
This volume details the curriculum at the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter Training School. It includes a chart of training concepts, a school brigade organizational chart, and a description of the 16-week training course. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25114/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 11: 864 Engineer Battalion, Special Category Army and Air Force
This volume includes a history of Special Category Army with Air Force at Fort Wolters, and includes many photographs of the 864th Engineer Battalion. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25113/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 12: U.S. Army Security Agencies
This volume includes many photographs of personnel of the 316th, 303rd, 330th, and 311th Army Security Agency Battalions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25112/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 13: Police, Fire, Training Aids, Band, Weather Squadron, Recreation, Prisoner of War Camp, Nike, Camp Wolters Enterprise, Parks
This volume includes a brief history (and many photographs) of Fort Wolters' 84th Military Police Detachment, Fire Department, Training Aids, 328th Army Band, Weather Squadron, Recreation, Prisoner of War Camp 1943-1945, Nike, Camp Wolters Enterprise, and Parks. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25111/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 14: Officer Wives Club and NCO Wives Club Activities
This volume includes many photographs of the activities of the Fort Wolters' Officers' Wives Club, NCO Wives Club, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Teen Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25110/