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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[The 100 Block of West Hubbard]

[The 100 Block of West Hubbard]

Date: September 1988
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture is an illustration of the south side of the 100 block of West Hubbard Street, looking southeast. The north side (and back view) of Cole's Florist and Hill's Style Shop can be seen at the center of the picture. Lynch Plaza, the darker brick building, is in the left middle background. Oak Avenue (U.S. Highway 281) extends north-south between Cole's House of Flowers and Lynch Plaza. Cole's occupies the site of the former Davidson Hardware, which burned along with the Damron Hotel in 1975. Lynch Plaza, the site of the mineral-water discovery well, was built on the site where the former Oxford Hotel burned in 1983. The parking lot seen in the right foreground of the picture was the site of the Damron Hotel.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[402 SW 5th Street]

[402 SW 5th Street]

Date: June 1974
Creator: unknown
Description: A Victorian home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here at 402 SW 5th Street. Note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and wraparound porch. The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, suggesting that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[416 NW 6th Street]

[416 NW 6th Street]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1906 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. The house was purchased in 1917 by the attorney of Mrs. Wylie, Judge W.H. Gross. It was known as "The Gross House" until Mrs. Gross' death in 1952. The Luther Waddy family subsequently became owners. The next people to purchase the house were Mr. and Mrs. Jack Catrett in 2006. There are 10 rooms and 8 fireplaces (all coal-burning), each one unique, and believed to have been imported. There are many stained- and leaded-glass windows. This view is of the front, southern elevation of the house. The photograph was take in June of 1975. The style of the house is Queen Anne, sub-type Free Classic. The shaped parapet on the tower, and the parapets on the gables are taken from the sub-type Patterned Masonry. A rectangular tower (more readily visible in the next photograph)is very unusual in this type of architecture (round, square, or polygonal towers are more common). However, the shape may have been dictated by the use of cement blocks, which was a new material in this time Another view of the house may be found in "Time Was...", by ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]

[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. The style of the house is Queen Anne sub-type Free Classic. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[612 N. W. 6th Street]

[612 N. W. 6th Street]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This house is currently [2007] owned and occupied by Gil Hulls. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The style is tentatively thought to be neo-classic. The two-story porch is unusual. It shows evidence of much remodeling. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[612 NW 6th Street]

[612 NW 6th Street]

Date: July 4, 1975
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[915 NW 4th Avenue]

[915 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and was designed as an entertainment and social center. This house has also been home to the John Moore family and the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of the house was taken in June 1974. Another photograph of the house, without the obscuring of the trees in full leaf, may be seen in the preceding photograph;or on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[915 NW 4th Avenue]

[915 NW 4th Avenue]

Date: April 4, 1976
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. The style of the house has been tentatively identified as Italian Renaissance. This house was also home to the John Moore family, and to the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of house was taken April 4, 1976. This photograph is to be found on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The 112th Cavalry Band, Mineral Wells, Texas

The 112th Cavalry Band, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The writing on the drum identifies this band as being associated with the 112th Cavalry, which was stationed in Mineral Wells, Texas. A National Guard Cavalry unit was established on West Mountain in 1919. This photograph appears to be taken in front of the cavalry stable sometime between World Wars I and II.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A 1949 Mercury]

[A 1949 Mercury]

Date: 1949
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Description: Illustrated here is a photograph of a 1949 Mercury that was owned by A.F.Weaver, Jr. when he sold Crazy Water Crystals after World War II in the Houston and New Orleans areas. Mr. Weaver's father moved to Mineral Wells in the 1930's to manage the Crazy Water Company's operations. Art, Jr. became a salesman for Crazy Water Crystals following World War II.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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