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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[The 100 Block of West Hubbard]
This picture is an illustration of the south side of the 100 block of West Hubbard Street, looking southeast. The north side (and back view) of Cole's Florist and Hill's Style Shop can be seen at the center of the picture. Lynch Plaza, the darker brick building, is in the left middle background. Oak Avenue (U.S. Highway 281) extends north-south between Cole's House of Flowers and Lynch Plaza. Cole's occupies the site of the former Davidson Hardware, which burned along with the Damron Hotel in 1975. Lynch Plaza, the site of the mineral-water discovery well, was built on the site where the former Oxford Hotel burned in 1983. The parking lot seen in the right foreground of the picture was the site of the Damron Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29855/
[402 SW 5th Street]
A Victorian home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here at 402 SW 5th Street. Note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and wraparound porch. The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, suggesting that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16167/
[416 NW 6th Street]
This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1906 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. The house was purchased in 1917 by the attorney of Mrs. Wylie, Judge W.H. Gross. It was known as "The Gross House" until Mrs. Gross' death in 1952. The Luther Waddy family subsequently became owners. The next people to purchase the house were Mr. and Mrs. Jack Catrett in 2006. There are 10 rooms and 8 fireplaces (all coal-burning), each one unique, and believed to have been imported. There are many stained- and leaded-glass windows. This view is of the front, southern elevation of the house. The photograph was take in June of 1975. The style of the house is Queen Anne, sub-type Free Classic. The shaped parapet on the tower, and the parapets on the gables are taken from the sub-type Patterned Masonry. A rectangular tower (more readily visible in the next photograph)is very unusual in this type of architecture (round, square, or polygonal towers are more common). However, the shape may have been dictated by the use of cement blocks, which was a new material in this time Another view of the house may be found in "Time Was...", by A. F. Weaver, on page 141. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16173/
[416 NW 6th Street, western elevation]
This home, at 416 NW 6th Street, was built in 1904 by Robert Wylie, a prominent pioneer cattleman. It was home to the Wiley family until 1917, when it passed into the ownership of the Luther Waddy. In 2006, it was owned and occupied by Jayne Catrett. Billy Gross, Junior, grandson of W.H. Gross, and an original member of the Heritage Association, wrote a detailed description of the house's interior that is too long to be included here. He worked at the Boyce Ditto Library until his death. This photograph, taken in June of 1974, shows the side (western) elevation of the house from NW 4th Avenue, showing the second intersecting gable, characteristic of Queen Anne architecture. The style of the house is Queen Anne sub-type Free Classic. For details about this house, please see the previous picture. Another view of it may be found in "Time Was...," by A. F. Weaver, on page 141. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16171/
[612 N. W. 6th Street]
This house is currently [2007] owned and occupied by Gil Hulls. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The style is tentatively thought to be neo-classic. The two-story porch is unusual. It shows evidence of much remodeling. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20264/
[612 NW 6th Street]
This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16172/
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and was designed as an entertainment and social center. This house has also been home to the John Moore family and the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of the house was taken in June 1974. Another photograph of the house, without the obscuring of the trees in full leaf, may be seen in the preceding photograph;or on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16170/
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. The style of the house has been tentatively identified as Italian Renaissance. This house was also home to the John Moore family, and to the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of house was taken April 4, 1976. This photograph is to be found on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16165/
The 112th Cavalry Band, Mineral Wells, Texas
The writing on the drum identifies this band as being associated with the 112th Cavalry, which was stationed in Mineral Wells, Texas. A National Guard Cavalry unit was established on West Mountain in 1919. This photograph appears to be taken in front of the cavalry stable sometime between World Wars I and II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25070/
[A 1949 Mercury]
Illustrated here is a photograph of a 1949 Mercury that was owned by A.F.Weaver, Jr. when he sold Crazy Water Crystals after World War II in the Houston and New Orleans areas. Mr. Weaver's father moved to Mineral Wells in the 1930's to manage the Crazy Water Company's operations. Art, Jr. became a salesman for Crazy Water Crystals following World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29967/
[An Aerial Picture of Downtown Mineral Wells]
An aerial picture of downtown Mineral Wells is shown here. The Baker Hotel (right middle of picture) and the Crazy Hotel (left middle) are included in it. Note: The "Welcome" sign was moved from its original location on the hill behind the Baker Hotel in 1972. It was moved to the east side of Bald Mountain which is due east of the Baker and now called Welcome Mountain, just above and to the right of the Baker Hotel, where it remains today. The Damron Hotel (shown one block this side, west of the Baker, in this picture) burned in 1975, thus dating this photograph to an era between 1972 and 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16204/
Aerial View of Camp Wolters
The only information about this photograph appears to be the written legends on it: [At its top] MW-4 AERIAL VIEW OF CAMP WOLTERS, TEXAS [At its bottom] PHOTO BY AERIAL PHOTO SERVICE KALAMAZOO--DALLAS 1B-H586 Camp Wolters was the predecessor of Fort Wolters in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39205/
Aerial View of Camp Wolters, Texas
An aerial view of Camp Wolters is shown here, looking north. The main gate is just outside of the lowermost center of picture. Expansion of Camp Wolters began in 1939 as the nation prepared for World War II. This became the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the U.S. in the early part of the war. Nearly 500,000 troops went through the Railway Station in Mineral Wells during World War II. The base was also used for troop training during the Korean Police Action. Some 90% of the helicopter pilots during the Vietnam War received all or part of their pilot training here; and during this time, the name was changed from Camp Wolters to Fort Wolters. The Fort was decommissioned following the Viet Nam War, and is now the Mineral Wells Industrial Park, with several large manufacturing and service companies located in it. There is also the campus of a local branch of Weatherford College, and a pre-release facility for State Department of Corrections prisoners operated by Corrections Corporation of America. (This facility is in the group of former barracks shown in the far right of the picture.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16232/
[An Aerial View of Cantex and Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells, taken from the east and south of Hubbard Street, April 29, 1967 is shown here. Note the Baker Hotel in the upper right corner of the picture. The Cantex Manufacturing Company is in foreground. Once a part of Texas-Vit (vitreous clay products), it is now producing PVC plastic products. The railroad right-of-way shows as a dark corridor to the right and above Cantex in the picture. The street at the far right of the picture is East Hubbard Street, and one block left of it is SE 1st Street (together forming U. S. Highway 180, providing one-way traffic, both west and east, through downtown Mineral Wells.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16198/
[An Aerial View of Downtown Mineral Wells in 1954]
This is a picture of an aerial view of downtown Mineral Wells (taken from the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, January 1954)at about South Oak Avenue, and looking north-northeast. Some of the buildings identifiable in the picture no longer exist. The Damron Hotel, at the middle left of the picture, burned in 1975. The Oxford Hotel/First National Bank building, one block east [right] of the Damron, near the center of the picture, burned in 1983. It has been replaced by Lynch Plaza. The Hexagon Hotel, in the upper left corner of the picture, (north and above the Crazy) was demolished in 1959. The Convention Center behind the Hexagon was demolished in 1976. Landmarks still standing are: The 13-story (including a Roof Garden) Baker Hotel, dominating the upper right of the picture; The Crazy Hotel (now a retirement home) at the upper left of the picture; and the old Post Office in the upper middle of the picture (between the Baker and Crazy Hotels), which is now the Woman's Club. The building across the street and to the south (this side of the Baker) was demolished to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, which in turn was replaced by The First State Bank. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20391/
[An Aerial View of Early Mineral Wells]
Two very early panoramic views of Mineral Wells are shown here, one of them, the UPPER PICTURE, being the north-west Business District of the city looking southwest. Note the horse-drawn transportation in the streets, and Poston's Dry Goods store in the upper middle. In the LOWER PICTURE looking northwest, a livery stable shows in the lower left corner; the Hawthorn Water Pavilion (with spire) is shown in the left middle above and right of the livery stable barn; the Crazy Drinking Pavilion is the large two-story building at upper middle of lower photograph; and the Hexagon Hotel is near the skyline at the upper right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16213/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, looking northwest. Identified buildings include the Baker Hotel (center), the Hexagon Hotel (right, north of Baker), the Convention Hall (next to and right of the Hexagon), the Box Factory (formerly the Crazy Water Crystal plant, left and west of the Hexagon Hotel), the First Methodist Church (across street right and northeast of Baker), the Baker Parking Garage (across the street, south of and immediately in front of the Hotel in this picture), and the Baker Water Works (extreme right middle, up the slope of East Mountain.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16222/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
A panoramic view of Mineral Wells looking southwest from East Mountain, Poston's Dry Goods store may be seen in the middle left of the picture, and the Old High School, Rock Schoolhouse, and West Ward School are visible next to West Mountain skyline in the upper right corner of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20305/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
Illustrated here is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east looking west. The Parkwood apartments and the brick factory are in the background. The Sands Motel is in the bottom part of the picture, and East Hubbard Street (Highway US 180) is in the far lower left corner of the picture. The large vacant area was later developed, with Lakewell House Retirement Home built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16199/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-southeast looking northwest. The Baker Hotel is the dominant building in the middle left of the picture. The Crazy Hotel is seen two blocks north (right) and one block west of the Baker. Immediately in front of the Baker is the hotel swimming pool (the second hotel to have its own pool). To the right (north) of the pool is the First Methodist Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16203/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]
A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16250/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (2 of 2)]
This aerial photograph is adjacent to, and south of, the previous photograph. It is taken from South Mountain, looking east-south-east. The Chautauqua is on the upper left of the picture. The Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (which burned March 15, 1925) is below and to the right of the Chautauqua. The area in foreground is a residential area of west Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16249/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells was taken April 29, 1967 from the East looking slightly West. Please note the Spanish Trace Apartments and the back of Brazos Mall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16194/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East 1967]
This photograph is an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-northeast. It was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace apartments across the street from it at the upper left edge of the picture. The large building at the lower left corner of the picture is the Sands motel. The large vacant area was later developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16191/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
This photograph illustrates an aerial view of Mineral Wells, taken April 29, 1967, from the ENE looking slightly toward the WSW. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16193/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
A view of the businesses and residences north of East State Highway 180, looking west toward the Baker Hotel in the background. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments and the Brazos Mall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16187/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells, from the ENE, was taken April 29, 1967. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments building at the middle-left of the picture. It lies across the street behind the Brazos Mall (off the picture, left of Spanish Trail Apartments). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16190/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial View of Mineral Wells looking SW was taken on April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and the Spanish Trace Apartments. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16192/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells from the east-northeast was taken April 29, 1967, near the convergence of E. Hubbard and SE 1st Street(that together comprise US Highway 180-a one-way street through downtown Mineral Wells). Note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments at the upper left of the picture, and the Baker Hotel in the background at the extreme upper right corner of the picture. The buildings in the lower left corner of the picture are motels. The large vacant area in the picture was later developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16188/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East-northeast, 1967]
This aerial view of Mineral Wells, from ENE looking WSW, was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Brazos Mall and Spanish Trace Apartments building across the street from it in the upper middle of the picture. ANTENNA PRODUCTS is at the left edge of the picture. CANTEX (PVC products) is above and left of the Brazos Mall. The Mesa Motel and Sands Motel are at the lower left corner. The large Vacant area was latter developed when the Lakewell House Retirement Home was built near the middle of it, texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16195/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Northwest, 1967]
This photograph illustrates an aerial view of Mineral Wells from the northwest. Note the Baker Hotel in the middle of the top half of the picture. The Crazy Water Hotel is below the Baker (two blocks in front). The Box Factory is the white many-storied building a few blocks below The Crazy and near the center of the picture. The Nazareth Hospital is a block to the right of The Crazy. The Mineral Wells Box Factory (Formerly the Crazy Water Crystals plant) is about two blocks this side (below) the Crazy Hotel and Convention Hall is a block to its left. The photograph was taken April 29, 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16201/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the South-Southeast, 1967]
This photograph shows an aerial view that was taken April 29, 1967. Please note the Baker Hotel in the middle of the upper half of the picture, The Crazy Hotel is two blocks right (north and west) of The Baker. East Mountain is to the right of The Baker and "The Cove" (housing area)lies between it and Bald Mountain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16197/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Southeast, 1967]
An aerial photograph that was taken April 29, 1967 of Mineral Wells looks northwest. Notable landmarks are the Baker Hotel (in the middle of the picture), United First Methodist Church (a block east and to the right of the Baker), the Crazy Water Hotel (above the church), the Box Factory two-three blocks right of The Crazy, the Old High School (the three-story structure about six blocks left (west) of the Baker at the edge of the populated area), and the Old Rock School House (right and adjacent to) the Old High School. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16202/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Southwest]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells from the southwest is shown here. It starts about SW 4th Avenue. The photograph was taken before 1967, the year the present First Baptist Church, which is not visible on lower left of the photograph, was completed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16200/
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells, Texas]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken by A. F. Weaver on April 29, 1967 looks North on Oak Avenue. Identifiable in the picture are the Baker Hotel to the middle right of the picture, The Crazy Hotel in the middle left, the old Post Office (now the Ladies Club) one block north of The Baker, and the Nazareth Hospital (one block left of The Crazy Hotel). Also in the picture are now-destroyed buildings: The Damron Hotel (just left of center), the Baker Water Storage Building (mid-upper right, small white building just to right of Baker Hotel), the Oxford Hotel (just right of center, now [2008] Lynch Plaza) and the Convention Hall(upper left). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20212/
[An Aerial View of Northwest Mineral Wells]
An aerial view of northwest Mineral Wells that was taken between 1959 and 1969 is shown here. The Hexagon Hotel on North Oak Street can be seen in the center left foreground with the Convention Center immediately north (to the right)of it, and the Crazy Water Crystal plant two blocks northwest. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16234/
[An Aerial View of Residential Areas]
An aerial view of residential area in Mineral Wells is shown here. The exact locale of the photograph is unclear. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16196/
The American Legion Drum and Bugle Corp at their 1933 Convention in Chicago
This much-decayed picture has obviously been pinned to a cork-board. Enough of the legend at its bottom survives to proclaim that the picture commemorates the attendance of the Drum and Bugle Corps of Mineral Wells' Fearis Anderson Post No. 75, at a national convention of the the American Legion, in Chicago, Illinois, on October 2-5, 1933. The photograph was taken, the legend states, compliments of the Majestic Hotel. Please note: The American Legion provided the following names to accompany the picture: David Burnswick,[sic] Director; Paul Grable, Drum Major; Tommie Burns, Trumpet; James W. Calvert, Trumpet; E.M. Davidson, Trumpet; Lawrence Davis, Trumpet; Sam Goldman, Trumpet; Jack Armstrong, Trumpet; Bob Echols,[sic] Clarinet; (?) Davidson, Clarinet; Lloyd Kendall, Clarinet; Bob Irvine, Clarinet; (?)Brady, Piccolo; Arly (?) Bolfour,[sic] S. Drums, B. Drums; Dan Raeffell,[sic] Bass; W.E. Davis, Bass; Roy Prince, Trombone; Vaughan Davis, Trombone; (?) Trombone; Franz Schubert, Baritone; Alex Pavlovsky, Horn; W. W. Woodward. Horn; George Oliver, Horn; Bill Chancellor, Color Bearer; W.H.H. Smith, Color Bearer; Allan Wallace, Color Guard; George Barber, Color Guard. This band was awarded a state championship three times. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16264/
[The Arch] "Welcome Ye Editors"
This picture of the arch, erected to welcome the members of the Texas Press Association (who held a meeting in the nearby Chautauqua auditorium--visible in the background), was taken from East Hubbard Street, looking North on Mesquite Street. The year is 1908. The Texas Press Association held its meeting on May 26. Notice the Ben Hur tracks (1905-1909) in the foreground. The Chautauqua hall was demolished in 1912. A note with the photograph states "The group of people were attending the Odd Fellows Convention and/or Press Convention". The note also states that "Bill Cameron [presumably the boy seated on the arch at the extreme left, and holding a sheet of paper, (not an apron) with the word "WELCOME" barely legible at its head] has an Odd Fellows Apron [sic] on." Please note: Bill Cameron was a long-time editor of the Mineral Wells "Index." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20468/
[The Arlington Hotel]
The Arlington Hotel--the largest hotel in Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas--with its famous thermal baths, is shown here. It is under the regulation of the United States Government. There is a beautiful "Cascade" swimming pool for guests. This picture is taken from a POST CARD titled "Plastichrome [Registered] by COLOURPICTURES, INC. Boston, 10, Massachusetts U.S.A." This hotel was said to be the model for the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39167/
[Art Weaver 's Studio]
This picture shows the 400 block of North Oak Avenue as it was in 1975. Art Weaver Photography (412 North Oak Avenue) is shown, adjacent to and right of the Grand theater (formerly the Crazy Theater). (This picture collection is part of the lifetime collection of pictures of Art Weaver.) The Baker Hotel is in the background on the skyline at the far right of the picture. NOTE: The camera angle and its lens make this picture appear to be a street corner. However, North Oak Avenue is actually a straight street, running North-South. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20436/
[Arthur Howard]
A photograph of Arthur Howard, it was taken about 1898. The cap he is wearing identifies him as "ASST CHIEF." (He is believed to have been assistant fire chief of Mineral Wells at that time.) No more information about the man has been discovered as of 2011. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29829/
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the purchaser who bought the first copy of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", and his wife. Left to right are: Rev. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Jack Dickens, purchaser; A.F. Weaver, author; Mrs. Jean Dickens. Copy Number One sold for $153.57. (H. Arthur Zappe D.D.S., bought copy Number Two for $45, and Bill Bennett bought copy Number Three for an undisclosed price.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20410/
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the auction of the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1975. Identified (facing the crowd in front row) are Mrs. Richard Warren (with arms folded); Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; A.F. (Art) Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore, Auctioneer. The auction took place inside the restored "Little Rock School", Mineral Wells' first public school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20409/
[The Auction of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells, First Edition]
Shown here are the successful bidders for the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," first edition, 1975. Identified in the picture are Reverend Mister Bobby Moore (front row left) who was the auctioneer; Mr. Jack Dickens (next to Rev. Mr. Moore); and Mrs. Jack Dickens (behind her husband), who bought book number one; Frost Bowman (barely visible behind Mrs. Jack Dickens) bought the fourth book; Bill Bennett (back row fourth from right) bought book number three; A.F. Weaver (back row second from right) is the author of the book. (H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, former mayor of Mineral Wells, [not shown], bought copy No. 2 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20408/
[The Austin Well]
This photograph shows the Austin Well as it was in 1974. A legend on the back of photograph reads: "Looking south shows remains of Austin Well in the foreground with the remains of what used to be the crystal plant. Across the street may be seen the St Regis box plant." The former Crazy Water Crystal plant, at the left edge of the picture, is now the St. Regis box factory This well is associated with a unique and romantic history: A cowboy rode a blind mare into Mineral Wells and auctioned her off for a dollar and a half. Mr. Austin acquired the horse, and put her to work drawing water from the well by turning a wheel to which was attached a rope, which with each revolution of the wheel, pulled a bucket of water from the well to ground level. Nellie was trained to pause at a point in her circular route long enough for the bucket to be emptied, then continue on to pull up the next bucket when it was filled. Blind Nellie was retired in her old age, but continued to walk a similar circular route in the pasture to which she was retired, pausing in each revolution, as before, until her death. Texas Packaging Company, Incorporated, has occupied the box plant since 1980. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29822/
The Avalon
The Avalon Hotel was located at NW 3rd Street and NW 3rd Avenue. Assembled here in front of the hotel is a group of people, possibly hotel guests. A reversed-image of this picture appears on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20306/
[A Back View of Businesses on the West Side of 100 Block and S. Oak]
Businesses are shown here at the southwest corner of West Hubbard Street and South Oak Avenue: The location of the original Colonial Hotel. (It was originally built in 1906 by J.T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country, and it was renamed the Damron Hotel about 1917 when Agnew and Bessie Damron traded a ranch for it. The hotel burned in 1975.) The small white building in the left middle foreground is a back view of Cole's House of Flowers (where Davidson's Hardware also burned in the Damron Hotel fire), next to it is Hill's Style Shoppe and Mineral Wells Office Supply. The vacant lot in the foreground is the location of the former Damron hotel. At the far left edge of the picture, to the east and across Oak Avenue, is Lynch Plaza which was built on the site of the former Oxford Hotel, that burned in 1983, along with the First National Bank. Lynch Plaza is named for J.A. Lynch, Mineral Wells' founder. who had a well drilled at this location in 1880, and discovered the source of mineral water that made Mineral Wells the most popular health spa in the nation at the turn of the twentieth century. A Texas Historical Commission Marker commemorating the discovery-well is embedded in a brick wall surrounding the parking lot of Lynch Plaza. Obscurely in middle distance, at the right edge of the picture, south and across SW 1st Street, are the offices of the Palo Pinto County Abstract Company and those of the City of Mineral Wells. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29856/
[The Baker Hotel: A Picture Taken From the South Window of the Hexagon Hotel]
A note with this photograph states: "Photo taken out of top floor south window of Hexagon Hotel. Photo re-printed in 1977. Photo probably taken 1954 due to penciled in date on back." (Also, the building in the lower left corner of the picture still bears the "USO" sign of World War II.) See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]. In front of the Baker Hotel stands the "Old Post Office, now the Ladies Garden Club Building. The Crazy Hotel can be seen between the right edge of the picture and the spire attached atop one of the gables of the Hexagon Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20475/
[The Baker Hotel at Night]
[Baker Hotel at Night. Cars parked on street. Wind blows through trees.] Legend: Photo & colorized by A. F. Weaver 1940 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39155/
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