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[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]

[The Brick Highway Between Mineral Wells and Weatherford]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The 1936 ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the new brick highway between Weatherford and Mineral Wells, now U.S. Highway 180, is depicted here. This photograph was taken just seconds before the photograph found on page 97 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS..." 2nd edition. Some of the dignitaries in the photograph are Allen Wallace, W.A. Ross, Pat Corrigan and Paul Woods. The new highway to Weatherford began at the 900 block of East Hubbard, and the brick was hand-laid by two strong Negro men.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!)east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California. Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons. Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where SW 25th Street and SW 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas

A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: September 24, 1921
Creator: Berry, H. M.
Description: A booklet about the history of Mineral Wells, Texas, from 1881 to 1921.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Brief History or A Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas From 1881 to 1921

A Brief History or A Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas From 1881 to 1921

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Brochure, Titled "Mineral Wells - A Town Built on Water"]

[A Brochure, Titled "Mineral Wells - A Town Built on Water"]

Date: 1981~
Creator: unknown
Description: One side of a fold-out brochure produced by the Mineral Wells Chamber of Commerce, probably during the City's centennial year, 1981. On the reverse side is a statement: "Mineral Wells, a Texas Main Street City, looks back over a century of history rich with the tales of early day ranching and the discovery of mineral water and its medicinal qualities." Color photographs of the city and its scenic area landmarks are contained in the brochure, along with a listing of some annual local activities.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]

[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A scene in the 400 block of North Oak, looking towards the south on Oak Avenue, taken in the 1930's. (Shadows indicate the picture was taken in the early morning.) The Budweiser Clydesdale team was introduced to the public in 1933, and is shown along the 200 block west. The "CRAZY" sign that spanned Hubbard Ave. (now US Highway 180) a block behind the Clydesdale team was erected in 1933 also, probably later in the same year the picture was taken. A two-story garage/office building, the former Seaman's Pontiac Agency (still standing in 2010) is visible alongside the Anheuser-Busch beer wagon. Other businesses noted are: Dr. M. S. Green, Chiropractor; King's Cafe. The prominent building behind the Clydesdale team is still standing at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue. Advertising signs noted: Texaco, Mobilgas, and a sign on the seaman's building for Crazy Water Crystals.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Buffet Table]

[A Buffet Table]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A buffet table, presumably in the Baker Hotel, is shown ready for guests to use it. Its opulence would reflect the quality of the Baker Hotel. The exact location of this buffet table is [2014] unknown. An ice sculpture of a sleigh and reindeer suggests a Christmas occasion. Further details are lacking.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Buggy in front of Presbyterian Church]

[A Buggy in front of Presbyterian Church]

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: A copy of this picture is found in A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", Second Edition", on page 188. The caption states "Cumberland Presbyterian Church at 901 North Oak Avenue." Note the surrey with the fringe on top. The person in the buggy has been identified as Mrs. Flora Howard, daughter of William Winfield Hayworth "Howard", the minister of the church. Howard owned a hardware store, going under the name "W.W. Howard." He is also listed as a member of the I.O.O.F. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church takes its name from Cumberland Street, Pennsylvania, where the sub-denomination was founded. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church is currently [2014] in Newberry, Texas. The building was sold to the Church of Christ, torn down and rebuilt. The North Oak Church of Christ still stands [in 2011] at this location, 901 N. Oak Ave. The picture is reliably dated to have been taken in 1912.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]

[A Building at the 500 Block of SW 4th Avenue]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This house, now [2009]located at 510 SW 4th Avenue at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and 5th Street, was a part of the original Mineral Wells College. The large structure was built in 1891 at 101 NW 5th Street. The front half of it was moved to its current location, and turned into a residence around 1902. The style is Queen Anne, but without a tower. Please note the two-story wraparound porch, which is rare in all parts of the nation, except for the south. This photograph may be found on page 170 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. [For more details about the College of Mineral Wells, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."]
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library