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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 29, Ed. 1 Friday, January 21, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417110/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 30, Ed. 1 Friday, January 28, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417103/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 31, Ed. 1 Friday, February 4, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417088/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 32, Ed. 1 Friday, February 11, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417141/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 33, Ed. 1 Friday, February 18, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417139/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 35, Ed. 1 Friday, March 4, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417115/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 36, Ed. 1 Friday, March 11, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417085/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 37, Ed. 1 Friday, March 18, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417086/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 38, Ed. 1 Friday, March 25, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417128/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 39, Ed. 1 Friday, April 1, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417120/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 40, Ed. 1 Friday, April 8, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417093/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 41, Ed. 1 Friday, April 15, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417090/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 42, Ed. 1 Friday, April 22, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417130/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 44, Ed. 1 Friday, May 6, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417112/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 45, Ed. 1 Friday, May 13, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417125/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 46, Ed. 1 Friday, May 20, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417087/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 47, Ed. 1 Friday, May 27, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417142/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 50, Ed. 1 Friday, June 17, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417111/
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 51, Ed. 1 Friday, June 24, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417109/
[The Womanless Theater]
This is apparently the picture of a picture of a fund-raiser performed by the Lion's Club. It consisted of a play in which men all played the roles of women. Identified (in print) are the three "ladies" in front: J. B Courtney (Miss Fortune), Charles Williams, and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Also identified (in holograph) is Cecil Young, third from the right, presumably among the standing "ladies." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24984/
[Women in a Decorated Car]
Five females ("Aunt Matie, Edith Preston, Lena, and two of Edith's friends", a legend states on the back)) in a decorated car outside the Western Union Telegraph office. Signs on and by the building read "Crazy Well Flats and Modern Rooms", "Cigars", and "Western Union Telegraph and Cable Office." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16358/
[Women in a Truck]
An unknown group of six women is shown posing on a truck. The type of truck is also not known. There are two photographs of this group of women with not a clue concerning who they were. See also, the photograph "Five Women on Bridge." The Bimini Bath House is in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20456/
[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park]
Games at Elmhurst Park in 1910 included women's basketball. The players here are wearing the typical basketball uniforms of "genteel ladies" of the day. Girls and ladies played on half of a normal basketball court with both teams shooting at the same basket. The game was restarted with a "jump ball" after each goal or foul (read: "Rule infraction"). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20403/
[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells]
A women's basketball game (at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells, taken about 1910) is shown in progress here. A "Dancing Pavilion" is visible in the background. Please note the players' uniforms. This scene shows a battle for the rebound after a shot at the basket. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16315/
[The Women's Corps, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense]
The Women's Corp, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense. The photograph pictures 13 (unnamed) women, a young girl, and A. F. Weaver during a flag presentation. Mr. Weaver, a Ham Radio operator, set up the Palo Pinto County Civil Defense on October 1, 1972 and was the director for 26 years. Mr. Weaver was also the author of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", a photographic history, first published in 1975. The book was revised and published again in three subsequent editions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25059/
Woodman of the World Camp Meeting , June 19, 1947
A white-ink legend on the face of this photograph reads: Woodman [sic] of the World Camp Meeting----6-19-47 Mineral Wells, Texas. phillips [sic] photographic [sic] Service [sic] A typed legend on the back of the photograph reads: WOW MEETING 6-19-47 held in Convention Hall. Recognized Front [sic] row from left: #1 Ezra Wortham. #5 Charlie Sheridan, #6 George Oliver 3rd. Row standing #1 John Birdwell, #5 Louis Fryer, #6 John Miller, #7 Ben Yeager, #12 Bill Teichman. 4th row: #1 Charlie Langley #15 Roy Langley [Unreadable deletions in green ink above appear this caption] This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39237/
[The Woodmen of the World -- 1905]
Mineral Wells was a popular convention city in its heyday. This photograph is part of the group attending a convention of the Woodmen of the World in Mineral Wells. The picture was taken around 1905 at the Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25086/
[The Woodmen of the World - 1911]
The picture was taken in 1911 during the Woodmen of the World convention. It shows the backside of the Crazy Flats, before the first Crazy Hotel sections were constructed. The buildings in the background are the four wings of the Crazy Well Water Company, "The Crazy Flats," where rooms for rent were also available. The first Crazy Hotel was built the following year, 1912, on the location where this convention gathering is pictured. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25083/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention, 1911],
This is another picture of the convention of The Woodmen of the World in 1911. Note the men holding symbolic axes. This picture represents half of a photographic panorama view. It was taken at the back of Crazy Flats, the Crazy Water Company's third Drinking Pavilion, that also offered rooms for rent. The first Crazy Hotel was built on this open lot the following year. Clark's Pharmacy and The Lithia Drug Company are also pictured behind and to the left of the "Crazy Flats." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16215/
[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]
The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men in two of the trees to the right of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39214/
The Woodruff Cottage
Copy around this picture states that the Woodruff Cottage was built by a Civil War veteran who came to Mineral Wells for his health in 1903. His health improved so much, writes the copy, that he decided to build a fine home here with rooms for visitors. A note on the back of the picture indicates the "Cottage" was opened in 1905. The copy also states that it was located one block north of the Crazy and Carlsbad wells, and became quite popular because of its convenient location. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20331/
[The Yeager Block]
This picture shows a white sandstone building on NE 1st Avenue named "Yeager Block." The original home of (what was often called) the Lion Drugstore, it once sported a metal statue of a lion mounted on the roof, which gave rise to the legend that the business was called "The Lion Drug." (Current living descendants of Dr. Yeager do not ever remember the drugstore being referred to by than name. However, a casual reference to it in 1912 refers to the store as "The Lion Drug.") It housed the Baker Medical Supply at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back of the photograph gives the year as "1993." The coffee shop "H2J0" is located [in 2007] where "The Rural Route" used to be. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20433/
[The Yeager Building]
A stone building named "Yeager Block" on the corner of NE 1st Avenue and NE 1st Street is shown here. (NE 1st is the street shown in the picture. Dr. Yeager lived two blocks east--up that street--of the drugstore). Once home of (what was known to some as)"The Lion Drugstore", it had a metal statue of a lion mounted on its roof. The statue of the lion was donated to a scrap metal drive for World War II, in order to aid the war effort. At the time of this photograph, (a handwritten note on the back of the photograph gives the date as 1993), it was housing the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20428/
[The Yeager Building]
Shown here is a stone building named "Yeager Block" on NE 1st Avenue. The building originally housed what was called, (by some) "The Lion Drug Store", and once had a metal statue of a lion on its roof. It housed the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left (south) of the photograph was named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back is given as 1993. The coffee shop H2JO was located on the north part of the building in 2006. Mike Chamberlain Photography was located on the north end of the block in 2006. It is now [2008] closed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20422/
[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]
The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20417/
Young Motor Co.
A text on the photograph identifies it as "May 1952-Grand Opening after fire of 1951," "316 E. Hubbard Street," "Photo by A. F. Weaver." This business was the local General Motors dealership and garage. It became Barnett-Young in late 1960's and in 1984 after Cecil Young's death it was Barnett Motor Co. The building is adjacent to the Baker Hotel parking garage, and, in 2007, it houses the H & H Tire Company. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25055/
[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]
Trees in full foliage (in July of 1975) obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2011] owned by an oculist, Dr. Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16153/
[The Zonta Club of Mineral Wells--a Program, 1994]
A program from the January 1994 Zonta International meeting in Mineral Wells honoring the distinguished women graduates of Mineral Wells High School. The mark "/MWSCH (3)" invites interpretation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16356/
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